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Old 07-30-2012, 01:50 PM   #16
Throttlemeister
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Quote:
Originally Posted by markharf View Post
John found the passes in Venezuela and Colombia required electrics. I sure didn't.

The general point is being prepared for whatever might befall, and being flexible with plans when encountering extremes. I sure favor warm clothes over stuff that plugs in, but then again I like paper maps vs. GPS. Horses for courses.

Hope all of the above is helpful to the OP.

Mark
I wonder if you road the same passes? Even in Ecuador I found some very cold country around Quito with some icy roads. Electric grips are very nice and could only help a person with Reynauds I would think. I use them much of the time when I'm not even cold just to soothe my hands and ad to the feel good

GPS is totally awesome too btwIt turns into bigtime adventure easily.
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Old 07-30-2012, 02:28 PM   #17
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All depends on the weather. Some of the passes I rode in Colombia were pretty darned cold above 10,000 feet. Two that come to mind are Berlin and Parque de los Nevados. Temps slightly above freezing, pissing down rain. I'm sure on other days it could be quite pleasant. I think that's what Mark is trying to point out, that timing is everything.

All that said, I used my electric grips a bit in every country that had some elevation, including Mexico and Guatemala. By the time I got to Peru and Bolivia I broke out the electric vest and used it occasionally. Coastal central Chile was surprisingly "chilly." I had snow in the Garibaldi pass into Ushuaia and didnt use the vest. Around Chalten I froze my stones solid even with the vest.

Everyone is different I guess.
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Old 07-31-2012, 06:30 AM   #18
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Does your Argentine/Chilean loop need to include Ushaia and Patogonia? I know that riding to the Southernmost point of civilization has a lot of appeal, but both of those countries have a LOT to offer beyond that. I did a tour with Compass Expiditions back in January and was amazed at how much great riding there is and how much there is to see and do.

Our tour didn't go any farther South than Bariloche. Mine was a short tour (9 days) and centered around the Lakes Region. Roads were amazing, including the gravel and dirt. Temperatures were pleasant with overnight lows only hitting the upper 50's and daytime highs in the mid-80's to low 90's (one stretch did creep near 100 until we got into the mountains). It is a desert so those morning lows rise quickly. I had brought a supply of long sleeve fleece, jacket liners and warm gloves and none ever came out of the gear bag.

You sound like a pretty seasoned adventurer so a tour might not have as much appeal for you as it did for me. I found Compass to be a perfect mix of security and adventure. Here is my ride report.

cliffy109 screwed with this post 07-31-2012 at 06:39 AM
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Old 07-31-2012, 10:44 AM   #19
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March is a tad late for Patagonia. I would recommend November trough February if you plan to do Southern Patagonia and/or Tierra del Fuego. Are you flying to Santiago? Renting a bike or bringing yours? How much time you have? Check out motoaventura.cl, they have some nice motorcycling tours. If time is not a constrain, plan to visit Chile's Lakes Region, cross the Andes to Bariloche and go South on Argentina's Ruta 40. You can then cross the border back to Torres del Paine Chilean national park, and head to Ushuaia on TdF island. Again, if you plan to stay in the Central-South area March should be fine.
Time is not a limitation.
I want to ship my Tiger there and back again.
No way, no motorcycle tour for me. I've been putting together my own rides for years, not gonna pay anyone to tell me when to stop and take photos and where I pitch my tent.
I have no trip plan ideas yet for this but just a general idea of a look from wherever I can ship my bike (probably Lima)
Yes, i'd like to see some penguins.
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Old 07-31-2012, 10:46 AM   #20
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Originally Posted by markharf View Post
A clear case of "it all depends." The OP has Reynaud's, which involves a particular susceptibility of the hands, even worse in response to vibration. Freezing weather and gravel roads on a motorbike is the perfect storm (ask me how I know this).

I saw rode through snow squalls (sticking on the highway) outside Uyuni in February. Also steady snow sticking on the highway between La Paz and Oruro in December. Others saw neither of the above. I was warm and dry the length of the Caraterra Austral in March. You found the coldest temps of your trip. John found the passes in Venezuela and Colombia required electrics. I sure didn't.

The general point is being prepared for whatever might befall, and being flexible with plans when encountering extremes. I sure favor warm clothes over stuff that plugs in, but then again I like paper maps vs. GPS. Horses for courses.

Hope all of the above is helpful to the OP.

Mark
yeah I'm a paper map rider too...very helpful. I know the gear and will back it up with heated stuff....also will look at January/February now.
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Old 07-31-2012, 10:49 AM   #21
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Originally Posted by cliffy109 View Post
Does your Argentine/Chilean loop need to include Ushaia and Patogonia? I know that riding to the Southernmost point of civilization has a lot of appeal, but both of those countries have a LOT to offer beyond that. I did a tour with Compass Expiditions back in January and was amazed at how much great riding there is and how much there is to see and do.

Our tour didn't go any farther South than Bariloche. Mine was a short tour (9 days) and centered around the Lakes Region. Roads were amazing, including the gravel and dirt. Temperatures were pleasant with overnight lows only hitting the upper 50's and daytime highs in the mid-80's to low 90's (one stretch did creep near 100 until we got into the mountains). It is a desert so those morning lows rise quickly. I had brought a supply of long sleeve fleece, jacket liners and warm gloves and none ever came out of the gear bag.

You sound like a pretty seasoned adventurer so a tour might not have as much appeal for you as it did for me. I found Compass to be a perfect mix of security and adventure. Here is my ride report.
Good point. I'm not wedded to a certain route....I could always park the bike and do a bus to the southern tip of Chile. If I'm riding for a couple months, a day or two in a bus is kinda nice. I'm a flexible person, routes change, just go with it.
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Old 07-31-2012, 11:03 AM   #22
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All depends on the weather. Some of the passes I rode in Colombia were pretty darned cold above 10,000 feet. Two that come to mind are Berlin and Parque de los Nevados. Temps slightly above freezing, pissing down rain. I'm sure on other days it could be quite pleasant. I think that's what Mark is trying to point out, that timing is everything.

All that said, I used my electric grips a bit in every country that had some elevation, including Mexico and Guatemala. By the time I got to Peru and Bolivia I broke out the electric vest and used it occasionally. Coastal central Chile was surprisingly "chilly." I had snow in the Garibaldi pass into Ushuaia and didnt use the vest. Around Chalten I froze my stones solid even with the vest.

Everyone is different I guess.
Yep, my post is a data point, nothing more. I'm not claiming my experience is the sole possibility so I don't know why anyone would think that. And not using electrics b/c they will eventually fail is interesting logic for a motorcycle rider considering the failure rate of parts. I use paper maps, gps, and a compass when I ride and guess what? All three mediums have been wrong at one point or another. And the GPS has been the most reliable compared to paper. Not even close. Being prepared is all about redundancy, you better have some in your plan no matter where you travel.
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Old 07-31-2012, 11:05 AM   #23
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Yes, i'd like to see some penguins.
Down in Ancud, there is a Perguin rookery. This is one of the few times on the tour that time pressure prevented us from doing everything we wanted. We rode down to a place that said "penguineras" but had done no research on the place. We didn't really find anything (other than an amazing coastline and beautiful New Year's morning ride) but one of the local fishermen offered to take us out to the penguins. This was during a morning that my father-in-law and I had gone out early to explore and realized that we didn't have time to take the man up on his offer.

In checking into things, it turns out it would have been easy to do but we just didn't have the resources on hand and time just didn't permit it.
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Old 07-31-2012, 11:10 AM   #24
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Oh, if you're riding Chile, be sure to pick up the COPEC map (you get it at the COPEC gas station). It's about the best paper map you can get for Chile.
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Old 07-31-2012, 01:08 PM   #25
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I think March and April would be good months for riding as you will be avoiding the School break (holidays) which starts as from end November to early March. During January and February a lot of Argentineans go on holidays also tourist from all over the world visit Argentina in summer, so roads become more dangerous and all places are crowded and expensive.

Personally, I would prefer riding as from say mid February to end of March or even mid April

As to weather, March/April are months somehow unpredictable you will have all types of weather along your ride in Patagonia, thus better to be well geared. Nights will be for sure cold all around Patagonia.

Here you can see all the roads in Chile:
http://www.300zx.cl/ga/300zx/images/mapas.html

Here you can see all the roads in Argentina: just click on "MAPA DE LA ARGENTINA" a new page opens and then click the number so to see the map.
http://www.aca.org.ar/servicios/cartografia/frame.htm

A nice web page with a lot of tourist info of Patagonia, Chile and Argentina
http://www.interpatagonia.com/index_i.html

Saludos & Buenas Rutas
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Old 07-31-2012, 08:51 PM   #26
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The penguins all leave some time in the late fall. I rode all the way there and didn't see any at all. They were gone. All just... gone.
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Old 08-01-2012, 11:05 AM   #27
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The penguins all leave some time in the late fall. I rode all the way there and didn't see any at all. They were gone. All just... gone.
Slippery buggers!
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Old 08-01-2012, 11:07 AM   #28
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Originally Posted by SUD-MAR View Post
I think March and April would be good months for riding as you will be avoiding the School break (holidays) which starts as from end November to early March. During January and February a lot of Argentineans go on holidays also tourist from all over the world visit Argentina in summer, so roads become more dangerous and all places are crowded and expensive.

Personally, I would prefer riding as from say mid February to end of March or even mid April

As to weather, March/April are months somehow unpredictable you will have all types of weather along your ride in Patagonia, thus better to be well geared. Nights will be for sure cold all around Patagonia.

Here you can see all the roads in Chile:
http://www.300zx.cl/ga/300zx/images/mapas.html

Here you can see all the roads in Argentina: just click on "MAPA DE LA ARGENTINA" a new page opens and then click the number so to see the map.
http://www.aca.org.ar/servicios/cartografia/frame.htm

A nice web page with a lot of tourist info of Patagonia, Chile and Argentina
http://www.interpatagonia.com/index_i.html

Saludos & Buenas Rutas
I'd like to do March/April. I can end a job I'm working on and have plenty of time to ship my bike.
I have the idea that I'll pack for cold and just put up with some hot weather if I encounter it.
I'll spend some time on these links thanks!
I'll go dark starting Aug 10th as I'll be on my Portugal ride...here is my post.
http://advrider.com/forums/showthread.php?t=725070

But I'll be in touch after I return end of Sept and continue. I'm pretty decided based on the great info /responses I've gotten here (thanks everyone) and am 75% decided to do this ride. All I need are riders to go with...
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Old 08-01-2012, 11:25 AM   #29
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Laugh

Quote:
Originally Posted by SpecialAgentNancy View Post
Chile-Argentina loop next summer.
Nice, Im local from Santiago , Chile welcome

Quote:
Originally Posted by SpecialAgentNancy View Post
Need advice on weather. What is the best months to ride these 2 countries. Just how cold does it get towards the south? (do I need heated gear if I go during summer)
The best months for me are between oct-nov-dec, the rest are so cold or too much rainy. If you wanto start like march-april, maybe you can start for the north of Chile-Argetina and enjoy the desert then goes to the south :)

Quote:
Originally Posted by SpecialAgentNancy View Post
Need advice on terrain/roads. I'm decent on dirt, gravel, etc....don't do well in mud and wonder just how good or bad the roads are. I'm not doing this to struggle through jungles and mud, I'm good with pavement the whole time but could throw in a little dirt here and there to keep it interesting.
How say Misery Goat before you can buy one copec guide, there are all the route in Chile, just check this is web version

http://www.chileturcopec.cl/node/16

Quote:
Originally Posted by SpecialAgentNancy View Post
Need advice on the political/military climate. Not aware of any armed conflict going on there but would like to know if there are regions of tension I should avoid.
Here is Chile is very quite, the police are safe (no corruption) and are really friendly with girl's drivers, plus if they are riding a motorbike jejeje


If you have another question or dude just send me a PM

And good luck with trip!

Vlad
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Old 08-02-2012, 05:00 PM   #30
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Nice, Im local from Santiago , Chile welcome

The best months for me are between oct-nov-dec, the rest are so cold or too much rainy. If you wanto start like march-april, maybe you can start for the north of Chile-Argetina and enjoy the desert then goes to the south :)

Vlad
Interesting you offer these months, everyone else is saying Dec-Mar. What is the rainy season there?
I went to New Zealand around Nov and didn't see the sun once....don't want to make that mistake again.
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