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Old 08-01-2012, 01:29 AM   #1
porkandcorn OP
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"Motoman" Rough Break In

Motoman:



Hey there,

I'm picking up a new 2012 Triumph Tiger 800xc this week, and in some research, ran across "Motoman" Pat McGivern's Engine Break In Secrets webpage. First of all, this guy seems like he's a superhero from another planet with the world's lamest website possible - funny to search the internet for someone these days and hit all dead ends. He seems to have disappeared. Anyway...

I'm not all that well versed in this stuff, but there is something about this technique that feels right.

Any thoughts (or personal experience) out there to share on whether or not this is a good idea?

My summary as I understood it:

-break in hard through all gears with heavy acceleration and then deceleration
-play with the throttle, never steady on it
-don't even start it the first time unless you intend to break it in
-make sure bike is warmed up 5-10 minutes on idle before you do this
-break in with dinosaur oil
-change oil after the break in (20-30 miles)
-ride like hell after you do this and laugh at other people in there 600 mile break in period

Here's the article:

http://www.mototuneusa.com/break_in_secrets.htm

And a funny youtube of this technique from India or somewhere:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ekjEZp5Ows0

Motoman:

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Old 08-01-2012, 04:47 AM   #2
omeoxlv
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edited

omeoxlv screwed with this post 12-01-2012 at 01:43 AM Reason: you cant educate pork
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Old 08-01-2012, 05:05 AM   #3
pretbek
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Quote:
Originally Posted by omeoxlv View Post
Hi, What he writes has some truth to some parts but really he is full of crap. Lets put it his way,
the maker of the machine has worked closely with oil companies and others to produce a machine that is going to provide you with reliable and trouble free riding for a long time. They spend millions of dollars researching and testing all this. They provide the new buyer with a manual which includes the run in procedure along with servicing requirements.
Why do you suppose they would lie about the running in procedure. Why do you think some jerk with limited knowledge and who wants to receive attention knows better than they do?
This subject (with suggestions from some other wanker) seems to crop up for a lot of brands.
IGNORE THEM.
FOLLOW THE MAKERS ADVICE.
WHAT COULD BE SIMPLER?
cheers and good riding
From my bike's Owners Manual:
Shift to 2nd @ 9 mph
Shift to 3rd @ 15 mph
Shift to 4th @ 21 mph
Shift to 5th @ 27 mph
Shift to 6th @ 34 mph


Something tells me not everything that they write in the manual is written only by engineers, but some mostly by lawyers covering the company's ass.

If you do the Motoman break-in wrong, you could ruin your bike then and there, and significantly so.
If you do the bike manual's break-in (can't do it "wrong", it is so slow and tedious), you probably get a slower engine with somewhat leaky piston rings causing a tiny bit of oil consumption, dirtier oil and more wear on the piston edges.

The latter is a much less dramatic "failure" and usually won't be chalked up to the prescribed slow-ass break in, but just to "that's how it is".
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Old 08-01-2012, 05:09 AM   #4
Trailrider200
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Went to the Marysville MD honda motorcycle plant a few yrs ago when they were still building Valkyries and Goldwings there. Took the tour through the assembly line, get to the intial startup/run dyno platform that ALL new bikes go to. Each bike was run through the gears to a top speed of 60 mph. The bikes were not run to redline, but the operator was far from easy on the rpms going through the gears doing his different tests. Valkyrie and GW engines are known for 400+K miles longevity and never burn oil. The motoman is right!
anybody who is around the building and tunning of new race engines on a dyno will tell u he is right. nobody puts 600 hundred easy miles on a race engine before it goes on the dyno.
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Old 08-01-2012, 05:24 AM   #5
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Oh no, somebody soon put the lid back on that Pandora´s box...
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Old 08-01-2012, 05:46 AM   #6
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This will be better than an oil thread with a little bit of truth and good observations in each post.

Triumph also has several videos of running each finished bike on the dyno up to high RPMs through all gears.

A custom "race" engine does not get built nor broken in with the same expectation of longevity vs. a "OEM" offering for the masses, etc., etc.

The worse things to do is to idle for excessive lengths of time, lug the engine and/or just keep banging off the rev limiter. Riding hilly and twisty back roads is the easiest way to vary speed, RPM, shift gears often and find nice places to stop and cool the engine to allow a few heat cycles to facilitate the engine, transmission and rider to get to know one another as well as bedding the brakes, etc. If you are concerned with oil contamination, it is likely a filter change and topping the oil level that will benefit the most as the oil won't break down in such few miles.

As omeoxlv posted, following the OEM guidelines should not be dismissed, Just ride her to let her start stretching her legs and then get a service when needed with quality oil and filters that meet spec and don't worry about anything other than finding more time to ride. BTW, our advice is worth what you paid for it and Triumph's is too. YRMV.


Cheers and Enjoy!

bobw screwed with this post 08-01-2012 at 05:54 AM
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Old 08-01-2012, 06:14 AM   #7
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I'd also follow the manual for break in. An oil change around 50 miles would be the best thing for your bike
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Old 08-01-2012, 06:45 AM   #8
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Like already said, Triumph runs each bike on a dyno. Then they dump the oil & put in semi-synthetic. Motoman's method is already screwed up. I changed my oil after riding home & the oil was like new. No metal shavings at all.

BTW, isn't he referring to a brand new thumper? I haven't read it in a long time.
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Old 08-01-2012, 10:06 AM   #9
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I'll go with the guy who is going to warranty my bike for 2 years, not someone who isn't.
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Old 08-01-2012, 07:23 PM   #10
protondecay123
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I've Motoman'd my last three brand new bikes and never had a problem with the break in or motors, but my bikes have not been Triumph's. Also I usually wait longer than 20 miles to change the oil, more like 50. Have never broke the speed limit. Find some country roads, get out of the city.
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Old 08-01-2012, 07:45 PM   #11
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Quote:
Originally Posted by protondecay123 View Post
I've Motoman'd my last three brand new bikes and never had a problem with the break in or motors, but my bikes have not been Triumph's. Also I usually wait longer than 20 miles to change the oil, more like 50. Have never broke the speed limit. Find some country roads, get out of the city.
Good to hear from someone who has done it, what bike/year and how many miles have you put on them?
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Old 08-01-2012, 08:06 PM   #12
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Old 08-02-2012, 04:22 AM   #13
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edited

omeoxlv screwed with this post 12-01-2012 at 01:44 AM Reason: you cant educate prok
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Old 08-02-2012, 05:45 AM   #14
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Quote:
Originally Posted by omeoxlv View Post
Imagine a fairly long drawn out exasperated scream.
Then a deep sigh and steadying of the emotions.
The FJR is in its prime and the S10 just loosening up nicely so far too early to claim any benefit or otherwise of the "rough" method. Its an absolute tribute to the engineers that we get away with this behaviour towards motors, not so many years ago that motor would be smoking and showing signs of an early death.
Any "method" that involves "rough" or "hard" treatment of an engine (usually with a male "i'll show you whos boss" overtone) needs to be avoided. Why? you say, "as you,ve just said, we can get away with it now because of superior engineering ability"
Yep, you are right in that and here is where it gets difficult. if you are young then your viewpoint is going to be quite modern with all of its quick gratification and short term pleasure bits. And very consumerist as in, "i'll just get another one".
But an older person like me will tell you that the engine (and overall bike) that is treated with respect and run in well and then ridden hard at times, but never abused, will provide better power, more smoothly and for longer than the engine that has been treated via the "rough, or whatever" method. There is a huge element of self confidence and pride in all this that cannot be put easily into words and certainly not by me. It sticks out like the proverbials when some people write about this or that that they indeed have no real knowledge or understanding or EMPATHY with their machine. Shallow and callous in fact.
There you go, that should give you wide scope for derision-----
Graeme
I fear that you've misunderstood the Motoman method.

There's nothing harsh or rough about it - and we're not "Getting away with it now because of superior engineering ability". In fact it's nothing new - I've seen the same method recommended for old Brit bikes, by one of the most renowned Brit Bike engine builders of the day.

So it's a sound, long established process.

It's simply a methodical system of loading and unloading the engine in order to ensure proper seating of the piston rings - surely a far better approach than simply following the age-old recipe of certain revs for a certain mileage.

In fact the only possible downside is that it may be a waste of time with some modern engines - ie those which are already run-in on the bench (doubtless using a similar method) before they even leave the factory.

So at worst you waste some time, at best you end up with a smoother, more efficient engine.
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Old 08-02-2012, 06:46 AM   #15
protondecay123
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It's actually pretty basic. Run it through the rev range up and down. It's not sustained red line or anything "rough". Sustaining a certain Rpm for extended periods of time is what you don't want to do. Change the oil early as that's when the biggest metal flakes are likely to fall and again at the manufacturers recommended first oil change using dinosaur oil.
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