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Old 06-10-2014, 05:19 AM   #1951
HPPants
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Bumpsie just so I can subscribe to this. I'm on page 18-ish and I can't stop reading it. So jealous - I'll catch up with ya'll in a few days.

When things are very quiet, and not so pleasant, the content of this thread is what I dream about.

Cheers!
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Old 06-10-2014, 05:28 AM   #1952
Jbone11 11
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Ol Man View Post
Didn't Radioman get a crate from a BMW dealer to ship his bike? You might PM him.
This. Check with any bike shops as they usually have a pile of shipping crates out back that all of their bikes came in...and since you two are on Beemers...I'd try the local BMW shops.

Question: Why are you guys shipping all your stuff in the Panniers? Seems like a lot of trouble. From what I remember from my travels down south, cheap suitcases can be had for not a lot of money....would save you from having to itemize your whole load. Just a thought, but then maybe you got a good reason....anyhoo...best of luck. Should work out though...folks do this stuff all the time.
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Old 06-10-2014, 05:55 AM   #1953
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Hard decision

Depending on your plans in Europe, you may also want to think about whether is would be cheaper to sell your bikes locally and buy a couple bikes in Europe, taking your gear as excess baggage.

There are usually good deals to be had in the UK (at least) and its about 2 days (hard) ride to Croatia.

Also, I know there is an American registered 1200GSA in Europe at the moment sitting idle. Contact Ed/lalo on his RTW in 800 Days thread. He's currently working in Alaska topping up his bank balance.
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Old 06-10-2014, 07:28 AM   #1954
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Updated from http://www.RideDOT.com/rtw/156.html



After a too-short two week vacation in the sunny Galapagos Islands, we flew back to Quito to be reunited with our motorcycles. We're feeling like our batteries have been recharged and we're ready to tackle the road ahead!


Although Neda loved the sunshine and the wildlife, she missed her bike more!


The long-overdue haircut. I was almost smooth-talked into a red streak...

We found out that an important religious holiday called Semana Santa (Holy Week) was being celebrated this week, and that there would be a big parade in the city to commemorate the coming Easter weekend. So we decided to stay a few days to see what the fuss was all about.


Oh no.

There was supposed to be some kind of parade of lights in the city streets on the Thursday evening, so we took a streetcar down to the historic centre. The skies darkened considerably before sunset, and our much-hated nemesis, the rain, started falling in sheets, drenching the buildings and the parks, sending everyone scrambling for shelter


Some of the residents are used to the rain


Water bouncing off the pavement, it was raining that hard!


We watched the rain from the shelter of one of the colonial buildings, huddled together with many of Quito's residents waiting for a break in the waterworks


Had a beer inside this cool-looking mall


The rains never really stopped that evening, but it did let up a few times

We walked the wet city streets looking for the Parade of Lights. We asked the locals and nobody seemed to know. Some said it was the day after, others said that there wasn't anything scheduled for that evening. Some policemen sent us in the wrong direction. We were wet and miserable. It was a very unsuccessful outing.


One of the places we ducked into was the main cathedral where they were having a mass. It was beautiful inside!


We called it an early night and rode back in the streetcar

We thought our batteries had been recharged from our time in the Galapagos. But being back amidst the constant rains had drained our morale almost immediately. Our batteries weren't holding a charge very well...


Policemen lined up, getting instructions for the big parade

The day after was Good Friday, and we headed back into the city for the scheduled afternoon parade. We knew this was going to happen because of the sheer number of people that were out on the streets. We've read that a quarter of a million people descend on the streets surrounding the Plaza de San Francisco to celebrate and watch the procession. An hour before the parade was to begin, most of the people had already taken up their positions on the curbs. Because we didn't know the route or the best places to see the parade, we got pushed to the back of the crowd.


Not going to make the obvious comment...

Every Latin American city celebrates Semana Santa a bit differently. In Quito, the parade is called the Procession of Jesus Of Great Power. Penitents, dressed as Jesus, show their devotion by dragging large crosses through the streets. They're accompanied by others in purple hooded tunics. The hoods rise up in huge cones and the men who wear them are called Cucuruchos, which is the Spanish word for "cone". The cones are a symbol of humility and purple is the colour of penitence.

The hooded Cucuruchos are a bit creepy-looking. And I'm not only saying that because I'm a visible minority...


Holding tightly to a card printed with the Virgin Mary


Females who wore purple tunics are called Veronicas, named after the woman who offered Jesus her veil to wipe his face


I couldn't believe how heavy this cross was!

This penitent above had to cut across the crowd to join the procession. We were directly in his path and had to move to give him space to pass. Because the crowd was so thick, we were pressed up against him and I reached up to help support the cross as he pushed through the people. Even with several people helping him hold up the wooden pole, I could feel the weight of the cross on his shoulder. It was as heavy as a telephone pole! This young man chose to drag a telephone pole through the streets for three hours! And the foot of the cross wasn't even on rollers! That is devotion!


More penitents and Cucuruchos slowly walking the streets

While there were many people in the crowd who were very religious, holding up flyers with the Virgin Mary and Jesus printed on them, there were many others like us who were just tourists, marveling at the sights and taking pictures of the procession.


As the afternoon wore on, clouds started settling over the city. We knew what was to happen soon...


Even Spidey took a break from catching thieves (just like flies), to celebrate Semana Santa


There were marching bands, priests in brown robes, floats, all sorts of different participants


After the parade, we shared a large bowl of Fanesca

Fanesca is a well-known Ecuadorian traditional soup with salted cod only served during Semana Santa. It's a very symbolic dish consisting of 12 ingredients, each ingredient representing an apostle, with the fish representing Jesus. We had grown a bit tired of the tipico meals in Latin America, but the Fanesca was a delicious change.

With Semana Santa over, it was time to flee the rains once again. This time we'll take our bikes with us...
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Old 06-10-2014, 08:02 AM   #1955
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Hey Guys...great update and photos...as always! Not sure if you sorted shipping yet, but I had a buddy that took his 990 to SA and back to Vancouver, so I asked him how he did. He basically piggybacked off of a tour company that was heading down there...got his ride loaded into the same shipping container. now this probably dosen't help your situation much, but he did recommend getting in touch with the tour companies that work out of SA and try to get the name of their local fixers. These guys will know all of the ins and outs and how much you will need to pay and to whom

On that note...Im sure there are European tour groups that do bike tours in SA....they all gotta get the motos back to the EU, maybe you guys could get in touch and see if they have room in their containers?

Anyhoo...just a thought.
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Old 06-10-2014, 08:06 AM   #1956
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Good advice about getting a crate at the BMW dealership, will try that.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Jbone11 11 View Post
Question: Why are you guys shipping all your stuff in the Panniers? Seems like a lot of trouble. From what I remember from my travels down south, cheap suitcases can be had for not a lot of money....would save you from having to itemize your whole load.
I know it doesn't look like it from our pictures, but we have 250L of stuff in the hard cases between the two of us, plus another 150L of soft baggage that fit on the bike. It's not something we can carry on the plane by hand, and would have to be shipped out of the country in its own container if we separated it from the bikes. So, if we shipped it separately, we'd still have to itemize it for customs.

We're discovering that Peru is one of the worst countries in Latin America in terms of inefficiency and corruption at customs. Things regularly "go missing" and items get held up in customs for months due to botched paperwork or ineptitude. We've been recommended to stay in Peru until the bikes clear customs and are on the plane before leaving the country. Also, we're taking anything valuable or irreplaceable with us as luggage. We're fully expecting items to be missing when we pick up the bikes in Europe, but at least we'll be in a place where we can replace (update!) them fairly easily.

We're still in a holding pattern, but we're also researching shipping out from either Ecuador or Chile at this point and just riding out of Peru. Selling the bikes may not a viable option because of the huge tariffs we would have to pay for breaking the terms of the Temporary Import Permit that the bikes came in on. Plus we are very attached to them...
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Old 06-10-2014, 08:40 AM   #1957
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valid concerns on the corruption Gene. It is one of the things my buddy was saying when he was explaining how he got his bike in and out of SA....an Epic story! Long story short, he got pinched by the police in Southern Chile, impounded his bike and demanded a tax...he begged and pleaded and was able to get his bike back but now had 24hrs to get from the very bottom of Chile to pretty much the very top to meet up with the tour group so he could make his ride home to Vancouver....he basically ran a 1 man Dakar stage. Hopefully you guys won't have to resort to something like this

But who ever recommended you guys stick around until your bikes actually get airborne is wise. As for the luggage thing...I see....I guess when you gotta pack your whole life onto a bike, it still adds up to a lot of stuff!
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Old 06-10-2014, 12:22 PM   #1958
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Gene and Neda, sorry for your troubles, but I hope they'll get sorted out quickly and in the meantime you'll enjoy some nice weather in Croatia after all that rain...
All the best!
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Old 06-10-2014, 05:51 PM   #1959
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I wish I could offer nuggets of knowledge on this..but I got nothing
There are always answers for these types of problems..if you have time. But this kind of stuff never allows time.
I wish you guys much luck and look forward to your "European vacation" story's
Gary
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Old 06-10-2014, 06:22 PM   #1960
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Nice to see you back on the road
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Old 06-10-2014, 06:47 PM   #1961
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After the parade, we shared a large bowl of Fanesca

Fanesca is a well-known Ecuadorian traditional soup with salted cod only served during Semana Santa. It's a very symbolic dish consisting of 12 ingredients, each ingredient representing an apostle, with the fish representing Jesus. We had grown a bit tired of the tipico meals in Latin America, but the Fanesca was a delicious change.

With Semana Santa over, it was time to flee the rains once again. This time we'll take our bikes with us...[/color][/QUOTE]

Oh how I crave fanesca!
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Old 06-11-2014, 05:16 AM   #1962
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Have you considered

Splitting up long enough for Neda to fly home and respect her family situation.you could stay in SA and keep your eye on things. A possibility.
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Old 06-16-2014, 07:47 AM   #1963
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Sorry I'm a little late to the party with suggestions here.

Quote:
Originally Posted by lightcycle View Post

We're discovering that Peru is one of the worst countries in Latin America in terms of inefficiency and corruption at customs. Things regularly "go missing" and items get held up in customs for months due to botched paperwork or ineptitude. We've been recommended to stay in Peru until the bikes clear customs and are on the plane before leaving the country....
Yep, that sure sounds like Peru...
In Lima: the guys at Endurance Motors were a great help with whatever you might need ("Endurance Motors SAC" on Facebook). Talk to Cristian. They may have crates if you haven't found them yet.

I had heard previously that shipping by sea is synonymous with the term "nightmare". I shipped out of Santiago and have found that claim to be understated. Ship by air for sure.

And as recommended by others, don't leave before your bikes do.

I hope things work out for you kids!

Phil
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Old 06-17-2014, 10:28 PM   #1964
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On June 14th 2012, we started a journey that was purposely designed to have no plan, no schedule and no destination. Throughout the last couple of years, we've had a lot of moments where we've said to each other, "Let's stay here awhile longer", as well as one: "Where else does this ship sail to? Cuba? Sounds good!" We've ridden through Central America twice, almost became Colombian citizens, and then cruised the Galapagos Islands, all according to no plan whatsoever.

So this last weekend, it was with bittersweet feelings that we celebrated our second anniversary on the road, because the winds are now pushing us half-way across the world to attend to a family emergency.

We've spent the last two weeks trying to organize our motorcycles and personal effects to be shipped to Croatia. In between all of the planning and logistics and worry, we took a small moment to remember what is important in our lives. That it's not the miles traveled, or the places seen - it's who you spend the time with. And that's exactly what we'll be continuing to do in Europe.
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Old 06-17-2014, 10:32 PM   #1965
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You guys are Great!!!

All the best to the both of you in your future travels!

GodSpeed!
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