ADVrider

Go Back   ADVrider > Bikes > Old's Cool > Airheads
User Name
Password
Register Inmates Photos Site Rules Search Today's Posts Mark Forums Read

Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread Display Modes
Old 08-18-2012, 12:52 PM   #46
disston
ShadeTreeExpert
 
disston's Avatar
 
Joined: Mar 2011
Location: Silver Spring, Md
Oddometer: 8,457
I'm glad you got the hand guards also with your fairing Bill. I think they add immensely to the style and function of the fairing. I have the hand guards on my ST also. Another added feature is that should the fairing take a spill the hand guards will make first contact and they act as protection bars, in a way. I have repaired the hand guards many times. They help save the paint on the main fairing. The hand guards I keep painted flat black.

Still I have had my Hannigan on this bike for 13 or 14 years. I do use the lowers but I don't have a functioning center piece. Might fix the one I broke earlier this year.

Think I might get around to drilling the holes to mount lights today.
__________________
.
Never memorize something you can look up.
---Albert Einstein

Pay your debt, piratejohn.http://www.advrider.com/forums/showthread.php?t=949341
disston is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-18-2012, 01:22 PM   #47
beemerphile
Beastly Adventurer
 
beemerphile's Avatar
 
Joined: Jan 2006
Location: Danielsville, GA USA
Oddometer: 1,687
I have the mid-lowers on my R1150R. It is the minimum set-up because it needs something to hold the oil coolers. That said, I like the protection it offers in inclement weather. I think the full lowers are a bit much. I had the hand fairings and broke one when the bike did a swan dive off of a maintenance stand. It did protect the fairing, but it died in the effort an I never replaced them.

To give you an idea of the fairing's effectiveness with mid-lowers, when I went to Prudhoe Bay this summer, it had been raining for two weeks and it was raining for most of my trip. Additionally, there were over 40 miles of construction zones on the 800 or so miles. This is what the bike looked like at the Arctic Circle on the return trip (having already been to Deadhorse and starting back)...



This pic of my riding suit shows the protection that the fairing provided...

__________________
ΜOΛΩΝ ΛΑΒΕ - Lee
Amateurs practice until they get it right, professionals practice until
they never get it wrong
beemerphile is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-18-2012, 07:47 PM   #48
Bill Harris OP
Confirmed Curmudgeon
 
Bill Harris's Avatar
 
Joined: Sep 2008
Location: backwoods Alabama
Oddometer: 6,750
The handguards are a useful option. The Vetter is overall wide enough that the "handguards" can be considered built-in. Without the handguards, the Hannigan is some 25" wide (about 8" narrower than the Vetter) and it will be novel to have a "slim and trim" fairing for a change. I can see that the handguards would be useful in cutting the wind on a long trip or in cold weather or in the rain. They aren't that much trouble to remove.

I've always had a rattle-can black finish on the fairing. Not cheap-o, that is just the way frugal/poverty riders did back then. But rattle-can paint is not the most durable, especially with the debris-abrasion and bug splattery on the front of the fairing. I may run it by a body shop and have them shoot a real quick acrylic job with minimal surface prep-- that should have the look-and-feel of rattle-can.

Especially reading about the aerodynamics of the RS fairing I'm thinking more in favor of using Mid-lowers. Not to mention, from Beemerphile's Prudehoe pix, they do intercept a lot of road spray. From the photos O've seen, the older lowers are one piece so I'm going to have to either cut them to make separate Mid-Lowers and Lower-Lowers (for possible use later on) or I might call Hannigan and see if Mid-lowers are available separately. This way I could save my "valuable" period-correct pieces for later.

It's h&ll being a packrat...
__________________
'73 R60/5 Toaster
Luddite. Not just a philosophy, a way of life...

Bill Harris screwed with this post 08-19-2012 at 11:25 AM
Bill Harris is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-19-2012, 06:49 AM   #49
beemerphile
Beastly Adventurer
 
beemerphile's Avatar
 
Joined: Jan 2006
Location: Danielsville, GA USA
Oddometer: 1,687
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bill Harris View Post
From the photos O've seen, the older lowers are one piece so I'm going to have to either cut them to make separate Mid-Lowers and Lower-Lowers (for possible use later on) or I might call Hannigan and see if Mid-lowers are available separately. This way I could save my "valuable" period-correct pieces for later.

It's h&ll being a packrat...
Just cut them on a line that follows the top profile of the cylinder heads.
__________________
ΜOΛΩΝ ΛΑΒΕ - Lee
Amateurs practice until they get it right, professionals practice until
they never get it wrong
beemerphile is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-19-2012, 11:34 AM   #50
Bill Harris OP
Confirmed Curmudgeon
 
Bill Harris's Avatar
 
Joined: Sep 2008
Location: backwoods Alabama
Oddometer: 6,750
My initial thoughts were to trim them at the bottom of the lip on the Lowers, rather a "minimalist approach" like with the RS fairing on this R100RS:



But you have a worthwhile point. On your "trimmed lowers" and on several pictures of muddy RS's, a spray line can be seen below that lip so it might be a good idea to trim lower to the top of the cylinders.
__________________
'73 R60/5 Toaster
Luddite. Not just a philosophy, a way of life...
Bill Harris is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-19-2012, 12:58 PM   #51
beemerphile
Beastly Adventurer
 
beemerphile's Avatar
 
Joined: Jan 2006
Location: Danielsville, GA USA
Oddometer: 1,687
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bill Harris View Post
My initial thoughts were to trim them at the bottom of the lip on the Lowers, rather a "minimalist approach" like with the RS fairing on this R100RS:


But you have a worthwhile point. On your "trimmed lowers" and on several pictures of muddy RS's, a spray line can be seen below that lip so it might be a good idea to trim lower to the top of the cylinders.
Well Bill,

If you cut it too short the first time, you're tanked. If you cut it to within an inch of the top of the cylinders and don't like it, you can always give it a second haircut.
__________________
ΜOΛΩΝ ΛΑΒΕ - Lee
Amateurs practice until they get it right, professionals practice until
they never get it wrong
beemerphile is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-19-2012, 03:01 PM   #52
disston
ShadeTreeExpert
 
disston's Avatar
 
Joined: Mar 2011
Location: Silver Spring, Md
Oddometer: 8,457
I have the full length lowers on my Hannigan. I like the way they look. I did have them off for a couple of years, I was working too much on the bike and left them off so I didn't have to keep putting them on and later taking them off. But lately things have been more stable and I have been able to leave them on.
__________________
.
Never memorize something you can look up.
---Albert Einstein

Pay your debt, piratejohn.http://www.advrider.com/forums/showthread.php?t=949341
disston is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-21-2012, 07:02 PM   #53
Bill Harris OP
Confirmed Curmudgeon
 
Bill Harris's Avatar
 
Joined: Sep 2008
Location: backwoods Alabama
Oddometer: 6,750
The used Hannigan I bought was shipped from North Carolina on Monday, is now in transit from the sorting facility in Kennesaw GA to the terminal in B'ham and should be in my sweaty little hands tomorrow afternoon.

The mirrors from Beemerphile were delivered on Monday.

Ha.

Attached is my wiring schematic for adding driving lights. The auxillary low beam (top) is a "fog light" and comes on only with headlight low beam. The auxillary high beam is a "driving light" and comes on only with headlight high beam. And both have override switches. It shows BMW /5 headlight wiring, but can be adapted to any model.

__________________
'73 R60/5 Toaster
Luddite. Not just a philosophy, a way of life...
Bill Harris is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-22-2012, 06:45 AM   #54
Bill Harris OP
Confirmed Curmudgeon
 
Bill Harris's Avatar
 
Joined: Sep 2008
Location: backwoods Alabama
Oddometer: 6,750
Forgot to ask--

No Hannigan instructions, but fairing installation tends to be fairly intuitive. Is there anything on the Hannigan that might surprise me? For example, on the Vetter they specify that the rear of the flat bottom of the fairing is to be a couple of inches lower than the front. Or something like that.

Otherwise, I plan to set things straight, level and symmetrical (hopefully I won't need to do any blacksmithery on the faring bracket).

Today's the day. Almost like Christmas Eve...
__________________
'73 R60/5 Toaster
Luddite. Not just a philosophy, a way of life...
Bill Harris is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-22-2012, 07:43 AM   #55
disston
ShadeTreeExpert
 
disston's Avatar
 
Joined: Mar 2011
Location: Silver Spring, Md
Oddometer: 8,457
I also bought my Hannigan used but it was many years ago. I also didn't get any instructions but didn't really need them.There was one part of my installation that may have not been standard. I got my Hannigan from a guy that bought it new to use on an R69S. (You may remember a mechanic named Lapp in the Washington DC area. He was around for many, many years but is gone now). So the problem was that my bracket was made for a /2 type frame and it is just a little different than my /6. I test fitted it and could see that to line up the plug wires with the cut out for then in the lowers the entire fairing would have to move forward about a half an inch and up about a half an inch. I used a piece of wood as a spacer in front of the bracket to move the fiberglass forward and for the four base attachments I used some round plastic washers from the hardware store. It now fits like a glove, as they say. The small adjustment pieces aren't all that evident although you can see them if pointed out.

As I said this was maybe a special instance but it was easy to position the fairing where I wanted it.

I bought a major part for my Hannigan earlier this year. I was trying to work out some electrical issues and it looked like I would be replacing the disconnect plug and consequently the rest of the wiring harness to fix these issues permanently. I even did find a source for the plug, which wasn't easy to find but it was of course available at McMaster Carr. I added up the cost of all the parts to make a complete harness and checked with Jerry what his would cost. I could have saved about 50 or 60 bucks to make my own and decided that getting his was cost effective because it would have driven me absolutely nuts to have had to make this thing. (Hey I do nice wiring. I know what I'm taking about). Turns out I was much happier than I could have imagined. The wiring harness from Jerry and family was much better than even one I would have made and it fit.

Hope you are happy when this thing arrives. Do you know how old it is?
__________________
.
Never memorize something you can look up.
---Albert Einstein

Pay your debt, piratejohn.http://www.advrider.com/forums/showthread.php?t=949341
disston is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-22-2012, 08:37 AM   #56
Bill Harris OP
Confirmed Curmudgeon
 
Bill Harris's Avatar
 
Joined: Sep 2008
Location: backwoods Alabama
Oddometer: 6,750
No idea how old it is, it's well-patina'd from the photos.

On the fairing connector plug, I plan to address that later. The Vetter (and AFAIK, the Hannigan) use a "Molex" style plug, white nylon with 6 to 9 pins. They work OK, but over years the contacts lose wear and lose good connection. Years ago I replaced those with the "Amp Circular Plastic connectors", which are much more reliable.

This:



instead of this:

__________________
'73 R60/5 Toaster
Luddite. Not just a philosophy, a way of life...

Bill Harris screwed with this post 08-22-2012 at 03:58 PM
Bill Harris is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-22-2012, 10:49 AM   #57
Bill Harris OP
Confirmed Curmudgeon
 
Bill Harris's Avatar
 
Joined: Sep 2008
Location: backwoods Alabama
Oddometer: 6,750
After I sent the above, I tottered into the shop in the intention of cleaning off that half of the workbench that has been piled high with junque for a couple of years so I could have a place to work on the fairing. At that very moment the FedEX truck pulled up with 50 pounds of joy. Pulled together a couple of storage boxes and started unpacking. It was packed with a LOT of foam and bubblewrap and the Baggage Gorillas only managed to add a couple of extra patinae to it. It is as-described by the seller.

After a couple of hours of inspecting, chortling, measuring , plotting and planning I'm going to break for lunch and do those aforementioned domestic chores so I can inspect, chortle, measure, plot and plan in earnest.

Turn signals need work. At a minimum, I'll replace the lenses. I'll look closely and see what brand they are, unless someone knows a source for them. Ideally, I'm thinking about fitting some factory or aftermarket turn signal assembly (with a proper reflector) of the same look-and-feel that can be shoehorned into the Hannigan space. I like BRIGHT turn signals.


PS:
Disston asked:
Quote:
Do you know how old it is?
Serial #41445, "CANADA" stamped on un-lithographed plate. I'll call it classic or vintage... :)
__________________
'73 R60/5 Toaster
Luddite. Not just a philosophy, a way of life...

Bill Harris screwed with this post 08-22-2012 at 03:43 PM
Bill Harris is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-22-2012, 11:17 PM   #58
Bill Harris OP
Confirmed Curmudgeon
 
Bill Harris's Avatar
 
Joined: Sep 2008
Location: backwoods Alabama
Oddometer: 6,750
Disassembled the Hannigan, checked it out and looks good. There are a couple of places where the "seams" between fairing inner shell and outer shell have separated-- that can be easily fixed by flowing epoxy into the space. Other than that the 'glas is good.

The hazy finish I saw in the photos is faded black rattle-can paint. I did a little paint removal with acetone/lacquer thinner in spots and it looks as though the gel-coat is good overall, with a few scratches from mishaps. I may carefully remove the spray paint and buff the gel coat finish-- that tends to be durable and trouble-free. I can live with a few scratches and "beauty marks".

I'm going to get a new H4 E-code headlamp. The one in the fairing is ancient and has reflector peeling and the headlamp in the Vetter is AFAIK 27 years old and has a light haze on the inside that doesn't want to wash out.

The headlight bucket is odd, different than what I've ever seen. The headlamp is held into the headligh bucket with four spring clips and the headlight bucket is attached to the fiberglas fairing with three spring-loaded studs, which also serve as the adjuster. Slick setup and overall in great shape. And there is the potential for that on-the-fly headlight adjuster I've been thinking about for years...

Need to run into town tomorrow for supplies needed for the wiring harness I'm making. And Friday I'll be doing the test fitting of the fairing bracket to see if any blacksmithery needs to be done before sending it off for some welding (tabs for lights and horns and anything else I find).
__________________
'73 R60/5 Toaster
Luddite. Not just a philosophy, a way of life...
Bill Harris is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-23-2012, 02:57 AM   #59
disston
ShadeTreeExpert
 
disston's Avatar
 
Joined: Mar 2011
Location: Silver Spring, Md
Oddometer: 8,457
The headlight is supposed to be the stock pieces from the bike. Reflector, lens and chrome ring are all BMW. The original fairing did not come with a headlight. What you have now is an extra headlight set up.

The wiring harness has spade connectors to plug directly into the bike's headlight socket. Then to the disconnect plug on the side of the fairing and finally to the new socket in the fairing. I thought I might simplify this some how but the original design works just fine and have left it as supplied.

The three prong adjustment on mine had some problem. I forget what it was but I think I had to use longer bolts or different nuts for some reason. Don't remember the details anymore.
__________________
.
Never memorize something you can look up.
---Albert Einstein

Pay your debt, piratejohn.http://www.advrider.com/forums/showthread.php?t=949341
disston is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-23-2012, 06:00 AM   #60
Bill Harris OP
Confirmed Curmudgeon
 
Bill Harris's Avatar
 
Joined: Sep 2008
Location: backwoods Alabama
Oddometer: 6,750
That is puzzling-- the headlight bucket doesn't look BMW (tho it may be off a model I'm unfamiliar with) and it seems to use inch-size fasteners on the adjusters (1/4-20 using a 7/16" wrench). I'll look again...

I could go simpler on the wiring, but the locking circular connector is already hard-wired into the system.
__________________
'73 R60/5 Toaster
Luddite. Not just a philosophy, a way of life...
Bill Harris is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Share

Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

.
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is On

Forum Jump


Times are GMT -7.   It's 10:22 AM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.5
Copyright ©2000 - 2014, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
Copyright ADVrider 2011-2014