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Old 03-02-2013, 01:12 PM   #1726
The other Ferret
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Quote:
Originally Posted by dirtdreamer50 View Post
I'll be 63 in May, too. When the CB750 came out, it was almost all that was discussed at the shops and the magazines. I was riding a 50cc Honda Cub, and the 750 seemed like a huge motorcycle, that only the most experienced riders could handle. The SL350 I bought in 71, still seemed small in comparison.

By today's standards, the 750's were really a mid sized, middle weight motorcycle. My how time changes perspectives on things...tomp dd50
An early happy Birthday to you, too...tp
And to you

My Dad my younger brother, and I all rode up to the local dealership for the official viewing of the new 750. We were flabbergasted. You are right it seemed overwhelming, four cylinders, for exhaust, four carbs. Too complicated! We were sure it would never sell. We had the same experience when we rode up to look at the new 1000 cc Goldwing. 4 cyl that stuck out on the sides, a gas tank that held electronics instead of gas, kickstarter was there in the fake tank too... How weird is that? shaft drive like a car, 800 pounds. We were sure it would never sell either. Man, how wrong could we have been? On both models lol
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Old 03-02-2013, 03:35 PM   #1727
jon_l
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Plungerhead View Post
Honda has a factory heated grip system for the 1100. Don't know if I'm going to get it when I take delivery this month or not, but definitely will this fall.
In 2010, I got the dealer to throw in Honda heated grips on my CBF, and they suck. Nowhere near enough heat. The Oxford grips on the V-Strom that I traded were worlds better, and sell for much cheaper.

Of course, I can't know whether what your dealer has available for your CB is the same product.
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Old 03-02-2013, 05:57 PM   #1728
xrcris
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I've got the "stick-on" heaters that all the catalog shops sell. Add your own relay, they work great. One tip, use contact cement to put them on, and they don't go anywhere, even on the XR.
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Old 03-03-2013, 07:30 AM   #1729
Starkmojo
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For years I rode a CB 750 and I was glad enough of having enough juice to run the headlight and turn signals. Mine was a 74 and had a switch so you didnt have to run the headlights and starter at the same time when it was cold- and that was a huge help on many occasions (as was the kickstart).. My how things have changed.
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Old 03-03-2013, 11:27 AM   #1730
markjenn
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Originally Posted by Starkmojo View Post
Mine was a 74 and had a switch so you didnt have to run the headlights and starter at the same time when it was cold- and that was a huge help on many occasions (as was the kickstart).. My how things have changed.
Most new bikes, and probably the CB1100, have an automatic system to disable the headlight during engine starting.

- Mark
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Old 03-03-2013, 12:39 PM   #1731
M3-SRT8
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Since this is the Flagship of the Honda motorcycle line, I anticipate zero problems with this bike. Zero.



Um, not this Zero, but I thought it is a cool pic of one...

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Old 03-03-2013, 12:40 PM   #1732
furious_blue
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Originally Posted by markjenn View Post
Most new bikes, and probably the CB1100, have an automatic system to disable the headlight during engine starting.

- Mark
AFAIK, it was the US Federal Government that mandated 'always on' headlights for motorcycles, sometime in the 70's (or was it the 80's ?), before that we had the freedom to decide for ourselves...
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Old 03-03-2013, 06:07 PM   #1733
The other Ferret
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Quote:
Originally Posted by M3-SRT8 View Post
Since this is the Flagship of the Honda motorcycle line, I anticipate zero problems with this bike. Zero.



Um, not this Zero, but I thought it is a cool pic of one...
If I remember right, the Zero was built by Kawasaki, but Sochiro Honda provided the piston rings.

Edit nope it was built by Mitsubishi

The other Ferret screwed with this post 03-03-2013 at 06:16 PM
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Old 03-03-2013, 06:33 PM   #1734
M3-SRT8
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Honda worked under Toyota during the war, providing piston rings, and automating propellor production for the war effort.

The A6M Zero (allied code name "Zeke") was designed and built by Mitsubishi, but well over half the production total was produced by Nakajima.

The A6M5 pictured is a Mitsubish-built example, or at least it's painted to represent one. You can tell by the camoflage scheme.

Kawasaki built a series of light and medium bombers before and during the war, as well as the superb Ki-61 Hein (swallow) Fighter, Allied code named "Tony."

Class dismissed.
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Old 03-03-2013, 06:33 PM   #1735
M3-SRT8
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Duplicate post.
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Old 03-03-2013, 06:49 PM   #1736
dirtdreamer50
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They were good and dedicated back then. Just glad we were more dedicated, enough to win the war, that is. Our world is too small today to ignore the talent of a country. Japan has learned to build mechanical products, almost to perfection. Their autos and motorcycles attest to that. I've owned 50 motorcycles over the years and have never had a bad Japanese made one, on road or off version.

The CB1100 is probably a thing of near perfection, something many claim will have no character, but I am sure will be a joy to ride.
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Old 03-04-2013, 12:19 AM   #1737
Guth
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I'm trying not to grow over-anxious waiting for this bike, but it's hard as I can barely wait to experience this bike for myself.

I believe that the CB1100 was the last bike that journalist Kevin Ash reviewed before his death this past January. When he wrote about the CB1100 for Bennetts Bike Social, amongst other things he had this to say:

"The irony is, this modern retro has ended up having more character than the originals.

Top work!"

Relatively speaking, that might not mean all that much. Still, reading stuff like this just makes me all the more anxious.
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Old 03-04-2013, 08:06 AM   #1738
dpg
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Originally Posted by Guth View Post
I'm trying not to grow over-anxious waiting for this bike, but it's hard as I can barely wait to experience this bike for myself.

I believe that the CB1100 was the last bike that journalist Kevin Ash reviewed before his death this past January. When he wrote about the CB1100 for Bennetts Bike Social, amongst other things he had this to say:

"The irony is, this modern retro has ended up having more character than the originals.

Top work!"

Relatively speaking, that might not mean all that much. Still, reading stuff like this just makes me all the more anxious.
Such an unfortunate event that happened to Kevin Ash. I haven't been this excited about a bike ever. I still can't believe I put money down on it. It is the not knowing that makes me so anxious. I am still fully prepared to see it and person decide that its not worth the money or it doesn't tick all the boxes. But wow, the anticipation is certianly ever present. I've been looking at many of the exhaust and think the moriwaki black "cones" are the coolest and sound great. However, with a chain, I am definitely not willing to give up the center stand. Some of their 4 into 1's are pretty cool too.







Listen here. http://www.moriwaki.co.jp/sound/01_e.html

http://www.moriwaki.co.jp/global/pro...A&model=CB1100

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Old 03-04-2013, 09:01 AM   #1739
ZappBranigan
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Quote:
Originally Posted by furious_blue View Post
AFAIK, it was the US Federal Government that mandated 'always on' headlights for motorcycles, sometime in the 70's (or was it the 80's ?), before that we had the freedom to decide for ourselves...
Must have been after 1974 because my 74 CB750K had an on/off switch for the headlights.
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Old 03-04-2013, 11:48 AM   #1740
dirtdreamer50
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Found this quote on when mfgrs were required to have "always on" lights, in the USA...

"US Federal law dictates any new bike made after March 1980 has a headlight which is always on."

Different states have different requirements for daytime lights. MSF advises running lights always, for greater safety. Some states also allow motorcycles to use the High Beams during the day, for greater visibility, too.
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