ADVrider

Go Back   ADVrider > Bikes > Orange Crush > Crazy-Awesome almost Dakar racers (950/990cc)
User Name
Password
Register Inmates Photos Site Rules Search Today's Posts Mark Forums Read

Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread Display Modes
Old 08-25-2012, 05:17 PM   #1
henryroten OP
Gnarly Adventurer
 
Joined: Sep 2011
Location: Back in sunny So. Cal!
Oddometer: 235
Nitrogen in tires

I was thinking that with this hot summer and all the reports about tire failures I would try replacing the air in my tires with Nitrogen gas. I know that race car drivers everywhere use it as it doesn't expand with heat, keeping the tire pressure from over heating and inflating the tires to dangerous levels (Nitrogen gas is also used in shocks for the same reasons).

So my first attempt (pulled the valve stem and tried to squeeze the air out) went fairly well but still I found that the tires would grow in pressure 3-4 pounds on hot highway speeds. So I then let them cool off and topped them off at 34 front and 40 rear (didn't start over, just added Nitrogen) and found that after 75 'spirited' miles on the twisties that the front stayed at 34 and the rear grew to 41.5 pounds. Not bad! the tires also felt (to the hand) to be cooler so I am so far pretty pleased with the swap.

The other benefit is that pressure should stay equal in elevation changes which are plentiful in the area where I do most of my riding (northern Utah).

Just thought I would share.
henryroten is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-25-2012, 05:34 PM   #2
biggus
Gnarly Adventurer
 
biggus's Avatar
 
Joined: Mar 2007
Location: Ubon Ratchathani, Thailand
Oddometer: 376
I read about filling your tires with nitrogen from the makers of Dynabeads. Glad that someone on here has actually done it.

I have wanted to do this to mine since I live in Thailand where the temps tend to be pretty hot.
biggus is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-25-2012, 05:47 PM   #3
Unkgd
Gnarly Adventurer
 
Joined: Apr 2007
Location: Central Coast,Ca
Oddometer: 343
Water vapor

Compressed air always contains moisture - which is the major contributer to rising tire pressure when the tire warms up.
Bottled nitrogen contains significantly less moisture (on the order of ppm if I remember correctly) hence - less pressure rise when heated.

It would be possible to use an eductor to remove the air from the tubes prior to refilling with nitrogen - which would save one step from what the OP did.

I have a bottle of nitrogen sitting in the hanger - might have to finally get arround to doing this
Unkgd is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-25-2012, 05:56 PM   #4
catalina38
Contrarian
 
Joined: Oct 2006
Location: Stingray bay CA.
Oddometer: 1,617
I prefer 78% nitrogen.
__________________
A mangy man chasing a cautionary tale
Lurking more and posting less

KTM 990R 500EXC
catalina38 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-25-2012, 06:20 PM   #5
biggus
Gnarly Adventurer
 
biggus's Avatar
 
Joined: Mar 2007
Location: Ubon Ratchathani, Thailand
Oddometer: 376
Quote:
Originally Posted by catalina38 View Post
I prefer 78% nitrogen.
Must be a diver.
biggus is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-25-2012, 07:07 PM   #6
bhorocks
Gnarly Adventurer
 
bhorocks's Avatar
 
Joined: Jun 2008
Location: Phoenix az
Oddometer: 346
good idea...
bhorocks is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-25-2012, 08:05 PM   #7
catalina38
Contrarian
 
Joined: Oct 2006
Location: Stingray bay CA.
Oddometer: 1,617
Quote:
Originally Posted by biggus View Post
Must be a diver.
I'm trying to avoid oxygen toxicity
__________________
A mangy man chasing a cautionary tale
Lurking more and posting less

KTM 990R 500EXC
catalina38 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-25-2012, 08:09 PM   #8
timekeeper
Adventurer
 
timekeeper's Avatar
 
Joined: Jun 2011
Oddometer: 15
I used Nitrogen in the tires of my GTR for 2 years. The hassel was NOT worth the results.
__________________
1980-R100/EML
1980-R100T
1984-R100/RS
1991-R100/RT & 2002 R1150RS
2006 ZX-14/Hannigan HP Hack
timekeeper is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-25-2012, 10:00 PM   #9
sstewart
Beastly Adventurer
 
sstewart's Avatar
 
Joined: Nov 2009
Location: Boaz,Alabama
Oddometer: 1,056
Nitrogen

Molecules are larger,less leakage.
sstewart is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-25-2012, 11:31 PM   #10
syzygy9
Gnarly Adventurer
 
syzygy9's Avatar
 
Joined: Jan 2011
Location: Perth, Australia
Oddometer: 296
Hate to be the bearer if bad news but N2 in conventional tyres is a complete waste of time (apart from the fact that good ol' air in almost 80% N2) - great way for tyre retailers to make some extra money though.

If however, you live in a very humid climate, conventional unfiltered air may have a lot of water in it which when condensing, evaporating or freezing (whatever the case may be) will result in pressure changes (which is one of the reasons commercial jets have N2 in their tyres). You could also argue that "pure" nitrogen does not have very much oxygen or water in it and being relatively inert does not react with the tyres, although I haven't heard of too many tyre failures caused by the rubber tyre compounds reacting/oxidising with air. With regard to pressure changes - pure air (no water) and N2 probably are both as close to an 'ideal' gas as each other and hence have same P to T ratios.
__________________
__________________________
bikeless no longer! welcome home, 2011 KTM 990 Adventure!
syzygy9 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-25-2012, 11:37 PM   #11
Nut Clutch
was Steve Lavigne
 
Nut Clutch's Avatar
 
Joined: Jun 2007
Location: Shilshole
Oddometer: 429
Quote:
Originally Posted by Unkgd View Post
Compressed air always contains moisture - which is the major contributer to rising tire pressure when the tire warms up.
Bottled nitrogen contains significantly less moisture (on the order of ppm if I remember correctly) hence - less pressure rise when heated.
Right on.

When I raced karts, I carried a nitrogen bottle around because it was a readily available source of consistently low moisture inert air. The size of the nitrogen molecules was not a concern. The important thing was to see a low and consistent tire pressure change due to heat. Nitrogen provided that. Also, you can get it from Praxair for something like $20 + deposit for a reasonably sized cylinder at 2000 psi. Just add a regulator and you are off to the races.

The 2000 psi cylinders are much more convenient at a remote location than a compressor that requires power and is noisy or a 5 gallon 125 psi tank that runs out quickly.
__________________
'07 KTM 990 Adventure Long Road to Dug Bar
Nut Clutch is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-26-2012, 12:24 AM   #12
SE Steve
Super Noob
 
SE Steve's Avatar
 
Joined: May 2011
Location: So Cal
Oddometer: 220
My experience with nitrogen is with commercial truck tires. From what I have been told is that nitrogen molecules are larger than oxygen molecules. So over time the nitrogen filed tires will lose less air pressure from leaking through the rubber layers . Nitrogen keeps the air pressure more stable day to day. Example I was using nitrogen in the steer tires of my truck 18 wheeler axle loaded at 1200lbs tire pressure at 120 psi cold. After 600 hundred miles pressure would be around 140psi. The next morning around 118. so it would lose a couple lbs per day. With straight O2 tires would lose 5 psi per day. My opinion is nitrogen is a little more stable than straight air in tires. In motorcycle tires I can't see it making a big enough difference to worry about. Truck tires usually come apart because they don't have enough air pressure. Could be they have a slow leak. When truck tires run low they over heat and explode. If your worried about tire failer stop and check your tire pressure if it's higher than you like take a break and let your tire cool down. Just my 2 cents
SE Steve is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-26-2012, 07:27 AM   #13
Peanuts
Beastly Adventurer
 
Peanuts's Avatar
 
Joined: Sep 2009
Location: UK
Oddometer: 1,531
I used Helium in my 990 Adv tyres. The whole bike now weighs less than my 250 EXCF.


Honest ;)

I also lube my chain with snake oil
Peanuts is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-26-2012, 07:55 AM   #14
Azmontana
Adventurer
 
Joined: Feb 2012
Location: Erlangen, Germany
Oddometer: 31
Quote:
Originally Posted by timekeeper View Post
I used Nitrogen in the tires of my GTR for 2 years. The hassel was NOT worth the results.
What hassle? It's a piece of piss to fill your tyres with Nitrogen.
Azmontana is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-26-2012, 08:59 AM   #15
Nomadix
Adventurer
 
Nomadix's Avatar
 
Joined: Feb 2011
Location: Standing directly above the centre of the Earth
Oddometer: 23
Cool2 One for the myths thread

For best results, I'd suggest a mixture comprising roughly 78% nitrogen, 21% oxygen and 1% argon. Don't worry about trace amounts of other gasses.

Also, for optimum performance and longevity, I recommend snake-oil in your engine .
Nomadix is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Share

Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

.
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is On

Forum Jump


Times are GMT -7.   It's 11:14 PM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.5
Copyright ©2000 - 2014, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
Copyright ADVrider 2011-2014