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Old 11-27-2012, 06:03 PM   #1156
Lucky62
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Quote:
Originally Posted by viajerosolo View Post
My buddy sent me picture of the adventure windscreen from crfsonly installed, and frankly; it looks a LOT better than I thought it might. Do you think a Giant Loop Great Basin would fit on the bike? I am fully aware it would look ridiculous, but it seems to be a good (and popular) option. The coyote is advertised on crfsonly, so I am sure that will fit; but may not provide the storage capacity for the sort of riding I am thinking of.

As far as being an "old guy," I am a young guy and would appreciate the 100lbs in weight difference from the change as well.
Thanks for mentioning crfsonly, I guess I "missed the memo" on that site. Looks like they have some good bits for this machine. I'm also not familiar with the coyote you mentioned, and didn't see it on the website, although they did show the Giant Loop MoJavi Saddlebag in the 250L section......

I just ordered a skid plate, the windshield brackets, and the Sequoia rack Sunday, but ordered them from TCI products. I'm hoping they will be here in a couple weeks. I have some old windshields off various bikes in the basement and hope to trim one down to fit. (yeah, this should be interesting) If anyone has tips on cutting a windshield I'm all ears.

I liked the Sequoia rack since I already have a pair of waterproof Ortlieb bags I used on my KLR, and it looks like I could tie just about anything to those racks. I've used Happy Trails aluminum bags on other bikes and like the capacity and the protection in a crash (of course I guess that could mess you up too) but when I hit a deer on my Vstrom those bags took most of the damage and saved my plastic. I'm hoping I won't hit another deer and think the soft bags will be good for carrying what I need.
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Old 11-27-2012, 06:09 PM   #1157
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Stock piston. This engine has about 200 miles.



Anti seize coating on the skirt



Valve cutaways on the stock piston



stock iron bore



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Old 11-27-2012, 06:21 PM   #1158
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Cylinder head showing combustion chamber and valves. Intake are the large ones. Tiny little sparkplug



Pickle forks, cam journals



Shims are on top the valve stem, under the pickle fork. Forks uses large needle bearing as the roller that is pushed by the cam. Cams are single lobe, which lightens the rotating mass in the valve train.




A look down the intake ports, looking at the valve stems and guides. About average looking ports.



Oxygen sensor shown in the exhaust port

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Old 11-27-2012, 06:36 PM   #1159
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Single lobe cams. The journals are very large, as long as there's good oil pressure, it's very unlikely these will ever score up and fail.



280cc big bore cylinder ready for installation



280cc big bore piston in place



We have the first new 280cc big bore kit installed.






Bill Blue is going to be testing the 280 kit for a bit, and is in development of the bigger kit.

(my guess is it will be 300cc or more)

Bill developed and has manufactured the Kawasaki 250 KLX351 kit for several years. His motorcycle experience goes well back to the '60's, he is involved in cycle restorations and our real passion, the smaller enduro bikes like the CRF250L.

He says stay tuned for the testing of the big bore kits.
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Old 11-27-2012, 06:46 PM   #1160
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Bake View Post
Single lobe cams. The journals are very large, as long as there's good oil pressure, it's very unlikely these will ever score up and fail.

Bill Blue is going to be testing the 280 kit for a bit, and is in development of the bigger kit.

(my guess is it will be 300cc or more)

Bill developed and has manufactured the Kawasaki 250 KLX351 kit for several years. His motorcycle experience goes well back to the '60's, he is involved in cycle restorations and our real passion, the smaller enduro bikes like the CRF250L.

He says stay tuned for the testing of the big bore kits.
Thanks for the detailed pictures of the motor. Be sure to let us know how that big bore kit pans out. Was the stock cylinder bore just overbored for the extra 30cc?
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Old 11-27-2012, 06:52 PM   #1161
siyeh
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jackpiner57, a long time ADVrider, is looking for a donor CRF250L. He makes rear racks and other stuff up in Vermont. He has a thread in vendors. Anyone up near him?

http://www.advrider.com/forums/showt...9#post20129399

you might score some free stuff!
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Old 11-27-2012, 08:29 PM   #1162
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Originally Posted by Guerillah View Post
Thanks for the detailed pictures of the motor. Be sure to let us know how that big bore kit pans out. Was the stock cylinder bore just overbored for the extra 30cc?
The original iron sleeve is removed on a lathe and the custom sleeve is pressed in.
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Old 11-27-2012, 08:45 PM   #1163
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Bake View Post
We have the first new 280cc big bore kit installed.



Bill Blue is going to be testing the 280 kit for a bit, and is in development of the bigger kit.

(my guess is it will be 300cc or more)

Bill developed and has manufactured the Kawasaki 250 KLX351 kit for several years. His motorcycle experience goes well back to the '60's, he is involved in cycle restorations and our real passion, the smaller enduro bikes like the CRF250L.

He says stay tuned for the testing of the big bore kits.
Will be interesting to see how the 250L's cooling system handles the big-bore kits given it only has one radiator compared to the KLX's two. I'm guessing we're going to see higher temps and possibly overheating issues due to the limited coolant capacity and in turn the fluid having 50% less cycle time and surface area to transfer it's accumulated heat. Here's to hoping I'm wrong though as all things are better with a big-bore kit.
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Old 11-27-2012, 09:23 PM   #1164
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CRF has a little bit more coolant than a WR250. I'm not certain if the KLX radiators weren't steel instead of aluminum as on the CRF, aluminum being a lot better heat sink than steel. I don't know because I sold my 351 several years ago, but the CRF radiator looks thicker than I remember the KLX.
That's the fun part of modifications. Some work, some don't. Engine Ice brand coolant always runs 10 degrees cooler.
I think Bill is installing a temp gauge in-line at the right hand side hard line from pump to cylinder, which should read coolant temp after the radiator. The KLX351 usually read @160F
If I were to play Devil's advocate about a big bore, I don't think cooling will be the limiting factor. It may be the starter. The KLX 351 need a battery at 100%.
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Old 11-27-2012, 10:30 PM   #1165
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I put the CRFL through it's paces today, wanting to form my own thoughts about it's overall performance after reading all the various opinions. For the most part, Nancy has been riding it so far, but now it's my turn.
From twisty paved roads climbing up to 5,000' to get to the trail to a variety of SoCal off tarmac terrain I was pleasantly surprised with it's overall performance.

I aired down the tires to 15 PSI front and 12 rear to help with traction to start and then hit a big hill I'm used to riding on my Husaberg.... The CRFL did just fine, though it's important to be in the correct gear as it doesn't have the power to chug out of things at low RPM's, it is a 250 DS bike after all, nothing a quick downshift couldn't fix for the most part. I have a 13t sprocket coming, that should help too.
The suspension is a little soft stock like most any bike, but for OEM components on a $4500 bike I thought it handled quite well. I was able to bottom out the suspension when pushing it hard in whoops and on a few jumps, the rest of the time I was happy with it's performance. I'm sure a suspension upgrade would be great, but I'm not about to dump a pile of cash into the suspension right now, the LRP is just fine for what it is and Nancy will be able to grow into this bike as is for some time to come. Though I will be putting a Scott's Damper on it asap, as any bike will benefit greatly from one.

Traction was decent with the stock IRC tires for the terrain I was riding on, the power was surprisingly good and predictable. It's true, the gap between 1st and 2nd gear is a little big for my tastes, but once you're going fast enough for 2nd or 3rd gear on the trails, I had no problem climbing steep hills or lifting the front wheel over things. It seems to be pretty well balanced.
The stock seat won't cut it for 500+ mile days, but that's nothing an Airhawk seatpad can't deal with easily.
It's a fun bike, and will be perfect for what we bought it for - mixed DS riding with plenty of headroom for Nancy to expand her dirt riding adventures. Hell, once I can get a bigger tank I'll be happy to take this on long distance camping adventures myself. For now MSR Dromedary bags in the Mojave bags will get us home with extra fuel.
It's forgiving and very stable when you get into trouble, comfortable to ride and doesn't wear you out, you just HAVE to stay on the throttle and maybe kick it down a gear now and then.
I don't see this as only being a light trail/gravel road bike, I had a great time pushing it pretty hard and riding some black diamond trails, it didn't buck back too hard and did very well. The little Honda that could.

I saw 53 MPG railing on it in the mountain twisty paved roads, and got 39MPG on varying single track and jeep trails. I hope the milage improves as it breaks in more.... 400 miles on it now.
I have done the airbox Mod since it's free and easy, looking forward to getting a Bazzaz FI controller too. Will be great to have a switch with two maps, one for power, one for economy.
I don't think it needs much more power in the dirt than it has now, I wasn't NEEDING more power to have a great time today, it just takes the correct gear choice and I surely won't be going beyond a FI controller to try and squeeze more power out of it. I'll leave that stuff for the tinkerers and trade it for a higher performance bike for Nancy if that time comes. Should be quite some time and many miles though judging from the fun I had today.
On the way home there was a strong headwind, combine that with climbing up the mountain and that's where I'm hoping a Bazzaz controller and a few extra HP will help, on pavement mostly is where it can use a little more power IMO. Though on flat land I have had no problem cruising @ 70 mph.
Great bike this CRFL is!




Here's a short video I threw together about the Little Red Piggy That Could and a few photos from the day.
I really like riding this Honda, and feel confident we bought the perfect bike.











































Airing the tires back up, sun going down, not a soul at the OHV park. Life is good.



















What a scene to finish the day, like a good omen for all the (s)miles to come on this bike...

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Old 11-28-2012, 04:12 AM   #1166
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Big bore

Those cylinder studs look REAL stout compared to my old XR250R.....
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Old 11-28-2012, 04:54 AM   #1167
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So lets see here....

Skidplates available - check
Big-bore Kits on the way - check
Fuel controller available - check
Aftermarket exhaust available - check
Custom rear shock available - check

All we need now is an easy fork swap setup and we'll have a gnarly little trail monster the will make even WR250R owners envious.

With that thought in mind, has anyone measured the outside diameter of their fork tubes directly where the tree's clamp onto them? I know the `05 CRF450's 47mm Showa forks are approximately 53mm at the top clamp and 58mm at the bottom clamp, and the clamps are spaced 18.5cm apart. I would imagine the newer 48mm KYB forks are right in the same ballpark. Just curious if the forks from any of the MX or more race oriented off-road models would be a direct fit to save on the expense of custom tree's.
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Old 11-28-2012, 05:45 AM   #1168
taninthai
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I paid $300 total, would have rather paid $225.
wow for the first service i paid 400 bht thats 8 gbp.......
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Old 11-28-2012, 05:58 AM   #1169
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Nice pictures, video and writeup Lost Rider.. good stuff. wish I had trails like that near me ha ha ha.
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Old 11-28-2012, 06:10 AM   #1170
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Originally Posted by MrFurious View Post
With that thought in mind, has anyone measured the outside diameter of their fork tubes directly where the tree's clamp onto them? I know the `05 CRF450's 47mm Showa forks are approximately 53mm at the top clamp and 58mm at the bottom clamp, and the clamps are spaced 18.5cm apart. I would imagine the newer 48mm KYB forks are right in the same ballpark. Just curious if the forks from any of the MX or more race oriented off-road models would be a direct fit to save on the expense of custom tree's.
It might be more appropriate to find shops that work on Kawasaki MX forks. Kawi seems to have the forks with valving in one leg and spring on the other like the CRF. I'm guessing a "gold-valve like" accessory or the Intiminator in the fork doesn't really care if they are working solo, or "with a buddy".
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