ADVrider

Go Back   ADVrider > Bikes > GSpot > Parallel Universe
User Name
Password
Register Inmates Photos Site Rules Search Today's Posts Mark Forums Read

Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread Display Modes
Old 09-11-2012, 12:29 AM   #1
fiwi OP
Gnarly Adventurer
 
Joined: May 2009
Location: Perth, Australia
Oddometer: 145
What to look for in a gps

Hello all. For a while now I have been using my cheap car gps on my f800. It has got me by fine up until now, doing long distance trips on road and a fair few kms on unsealed roads. I have done a reasonable amount of kms on what I would call remote tracks/roads also, but I havent really needed a massive amount of reliance on a gps, often a map has been sufficient. I am possibly heading on a trip in the near future, a trip that will be heading into a very remote part of Western Australia. unsealed roads and sandy tracks. My car gps will not be sufficient.

Im not here to ask 'what gps should I get'. That has been beaten to death in the laying down tracks section. What I am asking is what sort of features should I be looking for in a gps unit to get me by in remote areas. I did look in the laying down tracks section but found it confusing. I feel more comfortable asking the question in Parallel Universe section.
Some may also say that if I dont know all this info yet I shouldnt be heading into remote country. Maybe so.
Thanks. Grant
fiwi is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-11-2012, 02:24 AM   #2
Loutre
Cosmopolitan Adv
 
Loutre's Avatar
 
Joined: Nov 2010
Location: Reaver's Shed :o)
Oddometer: 3,217
Quote:
Originally Posted by fiwi View Post
Hello all. For a while now I have been using my cheap car gps on my f800. It has got me by fine up until now, doing long distance trips on road and a fair few kms on unsealed roads. I have done a reasonable amount of kms on what I would call remote tracks/roads also, but I havent really needed a massive amount of reliance on a gps, often a map has been sufficient. I am possibly heading on a trip in the near future, a trip that will be heading into a very remote part of Western Australia. unsealed roads and sandy tracks. My car gps will not be sufficient.

Im not here to ask 'what gps should I get'. That has been beaten to death in the laying down tracks section. What I am asking is what sort of features should I be looking for in a gps unit to get me by in remote areas. I did look in the laying down tracks section but found it confusing. I feel more comfortable asking the question in Parallel Universe section.
Some may also say that if I dont know all this info yet I shouldnt be heading into remote country. Maybe so.
Thanks. Grant

here is a link from the ADV forum called GPS 101: I think this one can help you.

GPS 101 - Which GPS For Me

A quick answere would be for your location something like Garmin Zumo's (heard the 550 is darn good)

Hope this could help you

Cheers,

Loutre - Tom
__________________
Keep the smile on your face!
F800GS - The ORANGE ones are faster!!

R1150GSA SE


Loutre is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-11-2012, 08:03 AM   #3
CheckerdD
Beastly Adventurer
 
CheckerdD's Avatar
 
Joined: Apr 2005
Location: Dave Rankine, Reno NV
Oddometer: 1,267
I have the Garmin 550. I would say it's the best for a F800. Since I own 2 other bikes I have 3 mounts and the Garmin goes with the one I am riding. Spend the bucks and you get what you pay for. Dave
__________________
Pavement! We don't need no stinkin pavement.
CheckerdD is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-12-2012, 04:23 AM   #4
GH41
Studly Adventurer
 
Joined: Oct 2011
Oddometer: 822
"Im not here to ask 'what gps should I get'. That has been beaten to death in the laying down tracks section. What I am asking is what sort of features should I be looking for in a gps unit to get me by in remote areas"

How remote is remote?? Are you traveling alone?? I would want something I could take off of the bike if I had to walk out. I would also want to be able power it with regular AA batteries after the internal Li battery dies. Look at he Montana. GH
GH41 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-12-2012, 05:25 AM   #5
FredRydr
Danger: Keep Back 500 Ft.
 
FredRydr's Avatar
 
Joined: Aug 2005
Location: Carlisle Pennsylvania USA
Oddometer: 2,238
Quote:
Originally Posted by fiwi View Post
What I am asking is what sort of features should I be looking for in a gps unit to get me by in remote areas.
It depends what you mean by remote. If remote on roads (even forest roads), a waterproof shockproof motorcycle unit (e.g., Zumo) would do. If remote in wilderness, then you should look at waterproof shockproof units which display topo maps well (e.g., Montana). Other functions such as satellite radio, MP3/4 player, traffic and weather are luxuries that you have to decide whether you need.

I don't think Parallel Universe inmates have a better handle on this than the GPS forums.

Fred
FredRydr is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-12-2012, 08:24 AM   #6
fiwi OP
Gnarly Adventurer
 
Joined: May 2009
Location: Perth, Australia
Oddometer: 145
Quote:
I don't think Parallel Universe inmates have a better handle on this than the GPS forums.
You might be right Fred, but I have posted in the gps section with not much luck so far. It feels like Im heading to a different country, a different culture when I head into another part of the forum

Quote:
It depends what you mean by remote.
http://www.exploroz.com/TrekNotes/Pi...all_River.aspx

It seems that a robust reliable gps is the most important thing to people. I also want to know about the importance of using waypoints, topo maps, ability to plan routes, that sort of thing.
I have done remote trips before, but these trips have been remote in the sense that I have been travelling into very hot desert areas with no sevices for 100s of kms and few other vehicles on the road BUT they have been on clearly marked, main unsealed roads. Little chance of getting lost . From what I know and pictures I have seen of the area I want to travel, there are some unsealed roads, gradually giving way to sandy tracks to tracks which would be very easy to miss and get lost. That is where im interested in the actual navigation features that people find the most useful when going remote.
fiwi is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-13-2012, 09:28 PM   #7
Mr B
Gnarly Adventurer
 
Mr B's Avatar
 
Joined: May 2009
Location: Merced, CA
Oddometer: 481
I went down this same road shortly after getting my bike. So Santa Clause was kind enough to spring me a GPS for Xmas. As Santa and I shopped on line I could not decide between the Garmin or Delorme and ended up getting the Delorme Earthmate PN40. What sold me on the Delorme is the mapping software as well as it is more suited for trails and back roads.
However,....the actual use of the unit is find when you are walking but on a bike trying to read the screen in bright light is not the best. Not to mention trying to reference the screen while moving...Thus I ended up ordering a Garmin Zumo 550 and it is great. Easy to read , easy to use with gloves and with a bluetooth set up you can get audio for directions or music.
I do not like the Garmin Software and the maps from Garmin are a bit pricey, but like some others have said you get what you pay for, (the Garmin Software is not bad it is just no quite as user friendly as the Delorme, at least for me)

The are both great products I just find the Garmin better suited for my application.

Hope that helps
__________________
"For once you have tasted flight you will walk the earth with your eyes turned skywards, for there you have been and there you will long to return."

Leonardo da Vinci[/FONT]
Mr B is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-14-2012, 05:29 AM   #8
fiwi OP
Gnarly Adventurer
 
Joined: May 2009
Location: Perth, Australia
Oddometer: 145
Sorry, I'm a bit slow with gps stuff. What are the advantages of topography maps on a gps?. When going remote/ offroad, do they show tracks, unsealed roads etc?
fiwi is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-15-2012, 01:58 AM   #9
Reklaw59
Softroader
 
Reklaw59's Avatar
 
Joined: Feb 2010
Location: Perth. West Oz
Oddometer: 208
Oz forum?

Would the question be better off in the Australian forum?
Local knowledge and all that stuff?

My 2 bobs worth - get something that can take topo maps, yes they show a lot more detail than the average road maps.
Garmin can do topo at a price, check out Shonkymaps which are free and bloody brilliant, only downside is that you cannot pre programme a route in Shonky but you can in Garmin Topo.
I use a Garmin 660, meh.

....... and don't forget your Spot.
Reklaw59 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-15-2012, 04:18 AM   #10
fiwi OP
Gnarly Adventurer
 
Joined: May 2009
Location: Perth, Australia
Oddometer: 145
Quote:
Would the question be better off in the Australian forum?
Local knowledge and all that stuff?
Hey Reklaw. I didnt really see the need to post it in the Aus forum as i thought it was more of a generic 'gps features in remote areas' post. I did post it in gps 101 but am having more luck with replies here. In saying that, I will also post in Aus forum.
fiwi is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-15-2012, 04:24 AM   #11
Twilight Error
Going nowhere slowly
 
Twilight Error's Avatar
 
Joined: May 2002
Location: The Submarine Mines
Oddometer: 22,463
Quote:
Originally Posted by fiwi View Post
Sorry, I'm a bit slow with gps stuff. What are the advantages of topography maps on a gps?. When going remote/ offroad, do they show tracks, unsealed roads etc?
Generally, yes.

I can't speak for Australian maps, but here in the Northeast US, there are a shit-ton of abandoned logging roads/ snowmobile and ATV trails that do show up on my topo map, but are entirely missing on my street map.
Twilight Error is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-17-2012, 09:19 PM   #12
Mr B
Gnarly Adventurer
 
Mr B's Avatar
 
Joined: May 2009
Location: Merced, CA
Oddometer: 481
To me the advantage of having the Topography on the map is two fold. As has been stated it shows more roads and trails than a road only map would show. In my neck of the wood some are slated as trails but are perfect for a motorbike, others are not...the second advantage, to me, is that if you look at the topo and see the lines getting close together you know you are in for a steep climb or descent, kind of get an idea of what is in store for you on the trail,dirt road or whatever.
I am sure that down under you guys have lots of maps too and this should all be generic,
good luck
Was down under once, you guys make a Fine Brew called Toohey's I think.

Bruce
__________________
"For once you have tasted flight you will walk the earth with your eyes turned skywards, for there you have been and there you will long to return."

Leonardo da Vinci[/FONT]
Mr B is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-17-2012, 09:55 PM   #13
syzygy9
Gnarly Adventurer
 
syzygy9's Avatar
 
Joined: Jan 2011
Location: Perth, Australia
Oddometer: 295
Having recently completed an outback Australia trek (on a KTM 990, sorry for lurking in the BMW forum!), I used a Hema Navigator 5i using the Hema and Natmap TOPOGRAPHIC maps (OziExplorer). These were very good and I could also download some georeferenced sat images as well.

You will definitely need a moving map style GPS (the Hema is essentially a PDA running OziExplorer for 'offroad' nav and a turn by turn nav package for standard onroad/city nav, in this case iGo).

The Hema 5i hardware is complete crap (sluggish response, very poor screen, a bit buggy) but I was very impressed with OziExplorer for off road navigation. Very good support and a good selection of maps.

I am now building my own GPS on a Samsung Galaxy Tab 7.7 (inch screen) running Android and OziExplorer and an city nav app (undecided which at the moment) but crucially for motorcycle travel it enables me to combine a GPS, mobile phone and net book functionality on to one device.
__________________
__________________________
bikeless no longer! welcome home, 2011 KTM 990 Adventure!

syzygy9 screwed with this post 09-17-2012 at 10:52 PM
syzygy9 is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 09-17-2012, 10:22 PM   #14
fiwi OP
Gnarly Adventurer
 
Joined: May 2009
Location: Perth, Australia
Oddometer: 145
Quote:
These were very good and I could also download some georeferenced sat images as well.
What benefit do you get out the satelite images?.

From all the stuff I have read, Im going to get a Montana650, seems to have enough bells and whistles for me. I have seen it online in a bundle with their Australia and New Zealand topo maps. Anyone have experience with this software?
fiwi is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-17-2012, 10:50 PM   #15
syzygy9
Gnarly Adventurer
 
syzygy9's Avatar
 
Joined: Jan 2011
Location: Perth, Australia
Oddometer: 295
Quote:
Originally Posted by fiwi View Post
What benefit do you get out the satelite images?.
I cherry picked some locations where I thought the available maps lacked detail and downloaded a sat image as well (georeferenced and converted to OziExplorer format) - this gave me the option of having a look at a high resoultion satellite image as well. This was useful for looking for bush campsites in the evening and where we had roads/tracks etc., not marked on the topo maps and we could see these on the sat images. Just some additonal info to help navigate in remote outback conditions. Having said that I found the GeoScience Australia Natmap package to very, very good; highly detailed and accurate and better than the Hema outback maps (which are based on these) in my view.

The most important thing for any outback Australia GPS is that you must be able to view 'raster' topo maps; 'vector' maps used in turn by turn applications do not have any 'topographic' detail (hills, creeks, fences, tracks, houses, stations, etc) and are missing most of the small roads and tracks outside of larger urban centers.
__________________
__________________________
bikeless no longer! welcome home, 2011 KTM 990 Adventure!

syzygy9 screwed with this post 09-17-2012 at 10:56 PM
syzygy9 is online now   Reply With Quote
Reply

Share

Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

.
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is On

Forum Jump


Times are GMT -7.   It's 06:12 AM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.5
Copyright ©2000 - 2014, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
Copyright ADVrider 2011-2014