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Old 10-09-2012, 11:26 AM   #16
Osadabwa OP
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Thumb Bringing it all together

We rode south from the snack spot on a pristine, rolling dirt road with views to kill for. It’s not the type of road we seek out, but when you’re stuck on it, it’s best to enjoy it. Big trail bikers would eat this kind of thing up, and there are miles and miles of it in rural Tanzania.


Above: A couple of minutes of lovely big red dirt... ought to make you BMW riders drool some

After twenty clicks or so of cruising, we found a 4x4 track leading west. Our plan was to locate something good that would connect our usual Sunday ride area with a track used for getting much farther west, like Morogoro. For that, we needed to find a crossing on the Wami river. The track looked promising, and did not disappoint. Dry from hours of baking sunshine, the sand was challenging and invigorating and we just blasted it until we found the TAZARA railroad tracks.


Above: Fast, sandy, wild riding that plunges smack into the Wami River... and a pretty decent video if I do say so.


Above: Sand tracks headed west to TAZARA

One kilometer of footpath bashing from the TAZARA line later, we pulled up under some enormous old mango trees on the high banks of the Wami River. It was a beautiful spot. I could have cracked open a beer and chilled there all afternoon except for two things 1) we didn’t have any beer and 2) we were very far from anywhere decent to sleep for the night and it was already close to 2:00 PM.


Above: The Mango shade trees and the Angel of the Wami


Above: Looking into our options at the Wami Mango

From the Wami, we shot north up a big dirt road, hoping to find a track to explore, but had no luck. After an hour of hard cruising, we could feel the fatigue setting in but couldn’t bring ourselves to abandon the day just yet. So, rather than push north to sleep on the Morogoro road somewhere, we curled east back toward the sea. The plan became to link up with a small singletrack trail we know of that leads to Kisarawe where we would regroup and reassess.


Above: Wry and Tigo take a breather after our long bout of big dirt

The little tracks to Kisarawe were spectacular. The afternoon light had gold plated the world, and the tracks were varied and unpredictable. My GPS ran out of battery, so for the better part of this leg I was lost, just following Ajax down one seeming dead end after another, through fields, across bush-burned hillsides, and randomly up and over railroad tracks all the way. It felt good to ride hard in the afternoon on challenging tracks, and we arrived in Kisarawe just as the sun was biting the dust.


Above: Wry and Tigo approach a junction


Above: A house somewhere near a railroad line, Wry’s dusty red eye


Above: Getting lost in it for old times’s sake near a stately baobab somewhere


Above: Portrait of a two-wheeled beauty, the approach to Kisarawe at twilight


Above: Excellent riding, pure joy... but we were getting fatigued and mistakes were coming one by one... CAUTION: Profanity! It could not be helped in a couple of places... like when I nearly kissed a railroad tie planted vertical in the ground on a blind turn...

Reaching Kisarawe with just the faintest hint of light in the sky, we decided to press on down the road to Mkuranga again for the night so we’d be somewhere good to start from the following day. It was a bit ugly, the ride. Tarmac with cars and people and dogs and goats at dusk is never much fun but the sky turned black in time for us to turn onto the white sand road, so we had another half hour or so of off-road night riding to enjoy. We took turns escorting Tigo, whose 690 headlamp had gone kaput for no apparent reason. He’d ride side by side with one of us until a bicycle or cow would appear ahead, then he’d duck back into our dust until the obstacle had passed. By the time we reached Mkuranga again, we were beat.


Above: Mkuranga guest house at night

Following day, I got up early and belted it back to Dar to be with my family at the beach and the other three went playing in the sand further South. By all accounts, that day’s ride was the best there has ever been, or will ever be again. Just my luck! On the other hand, it may be that they enjoyed it so much just because they spent the better part of the afternoon drinking and eating at Tigo’s boss’s house. We’ll never know for sure.


Above: Map of the ride. You just finished reading about the left loop. The right loop will remain a mystery unless the others fill us in (don't hold your breath, dear reader).

Until next time... if there is a next time.
Osadabwa out.
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I used to have a link to my African rides in my signature line, but every time I check it doesn't work. So, if you want to see Kilimanjaro, the Kilombero Valley, a bunch of short trips around Dar and another long one to Mozambique: go to my profile.
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Old 10-09-2012, 09:51 PM   #17
Dirtnadvil
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another epic ride, thanks for sharing.....
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Old 10-09-2012, 09:55 PM   #18
Finnito
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Once again very nice report
Sadly I missed the trip because of technical problem.

And got to get those BD Squadrons for sure.
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Old 10-10-2012, 09:18 PM   #19
Watercat
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Yeah,

Yeah,

You guys are fuggin' crazy . . . . . . The good kinda crazy ! ! ! ! ! . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Thanks for putting this RR together







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Old 10-11-2012, 01:56 AM   #20
KASUYAHO
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Thanks for the Tip on the RR Osadabwa, what a great place to ride, crazier the better.

Faceplant had to stayhome to wash his hair, he's getting soft since he sold his 650R it looks
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Old 10-11-2012, 03:02 AM   #21
Faceplant
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You ride like a girl and your mummy dresses you funny!
A real man would have head-butted that sleeper out the way.
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Old 10-12-2012, 12:09 PM   #22
Osadabwa OP
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Dirtnadvil, Finnito, Watercat, KASUYAHO, and even Faceplant, thanks for following along.

Finnito, it pains me that a Honda let you down, but I assume it was a fluke... on the other hand, DesertSweeper also has nothing but fits from his CRF... maybe you should both go back to XRs!

Faceplant, if you had been in my shoes, you would have knocked that railroad sleeper into Kenya... if you managed to squeeze yourself through the track that is! KASUYAHO commented that you've become soft since ditching the XR 650... I won't comment on that here on a polite riders' forum, but one thing is certain: we missed your idle, endless, beer-enhanced, irreverent, irrelevant, foul mouthed, thecklie accented, over the top banter on the trip!

OsaOut.
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I used to have a link to my African rides in my signature line, but every time I check it doesn't work. So, if you want to see Kilimanjaro, the Kilombero Valley, a bunch of short trips around Dar and another long one to Mozambique: go to my profile.
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Old 10-13-2012, 01:45 AM   #23
Faceplant
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we missed your idle, endless, beer-enhanced, irreverent, irrelevant, foul mouthed, thecklie accented, over the top banter on the trip!

It's nice to be luved
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Old 10-13-2012, 11:26 PM   #24
Bluebull2007
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Another really splendid RR!
Thanks for taking the time for the vids and photos, theyre a treat.

Loved the kids running away at the bike starting.

Enjoyed that near miss with the steel sleeper, I nearly bought it dodging one of those in South Africa a few years ago, super scary and could really change your day.

Only one question: Why was there no power sliding on the bigger roads?
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Old 10-14-2012, 09:20 AM   #25
Osadabwa OP
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Cool2 Cheeky question... my last-last word.

Bluebull, for whatever reason, I value my life.

On the little tracks there's no end to rear wheel drifting and sliding (intentional and otherwise) and near misses like that sleeper and whatnot, but the speeds are usually down in the this-will-hurt-but-probably-won't-kill-me range. On those big red dirt roads though, the guys sometimes go upwards of 120 kph (not me, the XR only rarely tastes triple digits) and the curves are looong... I can just imagine one of them holding a slide around a blind one only to meet a bus on the other side! Nope, for us, big dirt is a means to an end. Gets us from small track A to small track B, and that's it!

Plus, we've never worked out how we'd evacuate someone if worse came to worse... not like we've got Spot transmitters and Emergency crews on speed dial to help out!

Come on out and see for yourself (I bet you'll love it).
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I used to have a link to my African rides in my signature line, but every time I check it doesn't work. So, if you want to see Kilimanjaro, the Kilombero Valley, a bunch of short trips around Dar and another long one to Mozambique: go to my profile.
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Old 10-14-2012, 08:42 PM   #26
Bluebull2007
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Osadabwa View Post
Bluebull, for whatever reason, I value my life.

On the little tracks there's no end to rear wheel drifting and sliding (intentional and otherwise) and near misses like that sleeper and whatnot, but the speeds are usually down in the this-will-hurt-but-probably-won't-kill-me range. On those big red dirt roads though, the guys sometimes go upwards of 120 kph (not me, the XR only rarely tastes triple digits) and the curves are looong... I can just imagine one of them holding a slide around a blind one only to meet a bus on the other side! Nope, for us, big dirt is a means to an end. Gets us from small track A to small track B, and that's it!

Plus, we've never worked out how we'd evacuate someone if worse came to worse... not like we've got Spot transmitters and Emergency crews on speed dial to help out!

Come on out and see for yourself (I bet you'll love it).
Actually, I thought you guys were riding pretty fast, especially on the single track.

You are right of course about the traffic and staying alive.

I would love to come out there and do some riding, maybe one day I will be able to afford to - if I get things right at work- !!

Thanks again.

Neil
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Old 10-14-2012, 09:35 PM   #27
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Nice Ride Report!



Really enjoyed some of the food and drink pics. I was a Peace Corps Volunteer with moto in Togo West Africa 25 years ago. Brought back some good memories.
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Old 10-15-2012, 10:11 PM   #28
Osadabwa OP
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Thumb PCV with moto...

Jealous RedRockRider,

I was a PCV in Zambia 2000 - 2002 waay after the motorcycle was banned in order to save PCV lives. Knowing how I was, that was a very wise move on their part, but I was very disappointed when I found out I'd be on a Trek instead of a Honda! Glad our sad-assed-roadside grub reminds you of those dusty bygone days... but hopefully not of fast runs to the latrine!

Cheeers
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I used to have a link to my African rides in my signature line, but every time I check it doesn't work. So, if you want to see Kilimanjaro, the Kilombero Valley, a bunch of short trips around Dar and another long one to Mozambique: go to my profile.
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Old 10-16-2012, 12:09 AM   #29
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Yeah, I lived (and ate) with an African family. Definitely a few "explosive" moments . . . . . . and worse. All part of the experience. Be safe. Ride on!!!
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Old 10-22-2012, 11:37 AM   #30
Sandino
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Fantastic mate!!, thanks for sharing!.
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