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Old 10-05-2012, 05:07 PM   #1
Girthy Knobkers OP
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Another 1100 Sidestand (different)

So I did some searching and all refers to sidestand plates and hockey puck remedies and such... the deal with mine is that it just keeps going forward, it doesn't seem to be "out" far enough to keep the bike up. Loaded it falls right over and even unloaded it does sometimes. My question is, has anyone else had this problem? All bolts are tight and no parts seem to be missing,,, I am baffled.
Thanks,
Alex
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Old 10-05-2012, 05:10 PM   #2
Lomax
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Have you lowered your suspension ? If so you might need a shorter side stand. I am assuming that your saying it is not going out far enough means that the bike is almost upright and not leaning over far enough ?

Is this s new thing or has it always done it ?

Marc
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Old 10-05-2012, 05:15 PM   #3
Girthy Knobkers OP
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Thanks for the reply Marc, the susp is stock, its actually leaning over way to far, the stand seems to just keep going forward as I lean the bike over onto the stand...it is relatively new, I bought the bike back in 07 and it has always leaned pretty far but it just seems to be getting worse like something is wearing out but as I inspect it everything looks to be solid... until I lean the weight of the old beast on it
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Old 10-05-2012, 06:29 PM   #4
Lomax
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There should be a stop on the kick stand pivot and maybe it is wearing. You said you checked all the bolts and nothing was loose ? Or I have actually seen kickstands give it up and start to bend. I am not positive exatly how the 1100 stand is but wil look at my 1150 when I get home. Is it a GS, RT, S ??? I don't know if that makes any difference or not.

It sounds like you definatly have a problem with the stop, stand itself, or the mounting somehow. ??????? Look vewy vewy close and I bet you see something.

Marc
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Old 10-05-2012, 07:19 PM   #5
MsLizVt
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Just trying to be helpful ...

Quote:
Originally Posted by Lomax View Post
There should be a stop on the kick stand pivot and maybe it is wearing. You said you checked all the bolts and nothing was loose ? Or I have actually seen kickstands give it up and start to bend. I am not positive exatly how the 1100 stand is but wil look at my 1150 when I get home. Is it a GS, RT, S ??? I don't know if that makes any difference or not.

It sounds like you definatly have a problem with the stop, stand itself, or the mounting somehow. ??????? Look vewy vewy close and I bet you see something.

Marc


Girthy, hi!

Marc is quite right, it might seem like things are tight, but you'd be surprised.

In my experience with 1100RT's and 1100GS's a few things make a difference.

Well one thing to do is to put the bike on the center stand, put the side stand down and then push it down towards the ground and pull it up to see how much lateral travel you have. The springs make things feel like it's tight, but there can be a lot of looseness still.

What wears away is the bushing that's inside the piece on the frame of the bike, that the stand attaches too. (Number 11 in fiche)

The bolt can wear away against that bushing. (Number 13 in fiche)

The fork, or spread between the upper part of the attachment parts of the side stand can spread a bit.

The bolt that holds the whole side stand unit to the frame/engine can loosen up. It's really hard to tell if it's loose when it's on tension, like when the center stand is down. That bolt can also get bent too. That bolt will loosen up a lot, at least in my experience, unless you put some loctite on it (blue is what I use). (Number 5 in fiche - there are two of those bolts, one each side, not just the one on the other side as shown in the fiche)

If you have turned up the adjustment on the rear shock and/or the front shock, that will make the bike lean over more. You probably haven't changed tire size or anything like that, but it can change the lean angle too.

One thing that I learned the hard way is I would put all my heavy tools and spare parts in my left side pannier. That didn't work. I now put everything of any weight in the right side pannier. It's just enough to change the lean angle.

Cranking down the rear suspension will lower the bike.

Okay, so all that being said, you'll find that most everyone with an 1100GS has gone to the hockey puck or the some sort of other kind of foot on the bottom of the side stand. Personally, I bring a 4 inch by 4 inch piece of 2x4 on the end of parachute cord, that I through out and put the side stand foot on. Ummm ... my GS is kind of unique, with an 1150GSA suspension under it.

You can whack the fork at the top of the side stand with a three pound hammer, it'll bend in. Be careful to not whack it too hard, or too many times, so that you make it so you can't get it back on the bike. If you do, well a splitting wedge for cord wood works pretty good at spreading it again. Don't ask how I know. I will say though, that I've whacked the fork hard enough that it was really hard to get the fork onto the bike. I used a small hammer to top it back on, but it really made the side stand feel much sturdier.

GSAddict has a side stand that he's made for an 1150GS, that's adjustable. I think, and I may be wrong, but I think Woody of Woody's Wheels made something like this too. GSAddict's photo below.

It's my opinion, that not any one thing will make a big difference, it's the combination of all of the above, that will make the bike not tip over as much.

Am I making sense?



Liz

PS: Can you take photos and post them?






GSAddicts thread


Max's BMW Fiche













MsLizVt screwed with this post 10-05-2012 at 07:25 PM
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Old 10-06-2012, 12:17 PM   #6
Girthy Knobkers OP
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Thanks!

Thanks for the detailed response! the stop seems to be in tact but the bushing (#11) is probably the problem. I will take it apart tonight after work and do some inspecting!
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Old 10-06-2012, 12:46 PM   #7
vintagerider
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Bmw upgraged the 1100 GS ss in 1997

Old style: foot is triangular.Revised style 1997> rectangular foot, has a different bend and is substantially better. If you order a new ss you will get the revised ss. Try to avoid using the ss when parking in the City. Cage drivers push up against the engine and bend the stand.
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