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Old 12-15-2012, 04:33 PM   #151
RexBuck OP
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Dec 5 - Crossing into Panama

Time to move on and cross into Panama. Again, heard lots of horror stories about this crossing with over 4 hours in some cases. So, as I’ve been doing when I can, left early to hit the border shortly after it opens at 8 am (Costa Rica time – 9 am Panama time)

Guy waves me over to a parking spot in front of the Costa Rica Migración and Aduana – all in the same building. Great, lots of people standing around with guns so not worried about my bike, even though I have my super duper security system in place.





Go the the Migración window and am second in line – bunch of people fall in behind me. One guy with a window open, tiny office with one other guy shuffling papers and two guys reading newspapers. I smiled.

Have to fill out a form for the Migración guy before he stamps your passport and then off next door to the Aduana. About 6 or 7 people leaning against the counter and one lady working at a desk processing paperwork. Have to fill out another form (make sure you fill out the top and the bottom which are identical) stating you will or will not return to Costa Rica within 90 days. After about a half hour, finally get my receipt and I’m checked out. I thought it was funny that the lady left one of her stamps on the counter and the truckers grabbed it and stamped all their documents. She didn’t seem to mind.

Then head across the bridge to Panama. Until recently the bridge on the right was the only way to get across and you apparently had to dodge pedestrians (of which there was a steady stream and missing boards. Thankfully, they have installed a new, somewhat swaybacked bridge for vehicles.





Arrive at the Panama end and a guy stops you right at the end of the bridge. Checks your passport and then wants to search your stuff. OK – I’ve heard of these guys searching through every nook and cranny which is an incredible pain in the ass because all of my luggage is assembled and then covered with my super duper security system. So I hop off and open one side bag. He glances in. Hmm, maybe this won’t be too bad. I make a big deal of opening the left side bag and prop my leg against the lid and open it real slow – stuff does tend to move around because the bike is leaning over to the left. It’s not that bad but I thought I’d build it up a bit. He looks at my other stuff all secured and locked down under my super duper security system, shrugs and tells me where I have to go next.

Next stop is the mandatory insurance. At the bottom of the hill from the bridge, on the left is kind of a five and dime store type mercado – go up the stairs to the second floor and right inside is the girl selling the insurance. $15 and she even gave me the copies of my passport and registration I’ll need for the Aduana.


Now climb up the stairs to the entrance of the old bridge where the Migración and Aduana are located. Passport stamp is straight forward. Aduana - hand the lady your documents, she goes away for about 10 or 15 minutes and comes back with some documents. Go next door where a couple of guys are sitting there doing nothing for a final signature , but first pay a $3 “tax” (no receipt). Finally the guy that searched me at the bridge shows up and signs the papers for the moto.

Done. Took just two hours. But the time switches to Eastern time as you cross the border so you lose an hour.

One of the strange things about this crossing is that I did not get approached by one helper or money changer on either side. Maybe I was just too early for them. I had a whole pocket full of Cordobas from Costa Rica I needed to get rid of so when I was finishing checking my bike in I finally asked one guy who was generally pimping for the cabbies if there were any money changers around. He hollered at some guy below by the shops who ran up. Bugger didn’t even offer any Vaseline – wanted about a 20% premium which I ground down a bit. I didn’t feel like finding a bank so took it and carried on.

By the way, Panama’s currency is the Balboa which happens to equal one US dollar. So, they make their own coins but use US bucks for the bills

Here is some final housekeeping stuff: I was told the border closes at 5 so if you are wanting to do an afternoon crossing, make sure you have lots of time. There is a town about 15 KM from the border, Changuinola that has a number of gas stations and I think I even saw a couple of hotels – bit of a ratty looking border town though.

Nice ride across the country. Ride south for quite awhile then turns more westerly - took about 80 KM to ride from the east coast to the west coast (I think it is about 60km as the crow flies) so, I guess I now qualify for the Ironbutt 50CC (That is a medal you can earn if ride a motorcycle coast to coast in under 50 hours) – no big deal, I did it in a little over an hour. Piece of cake!

Looking over the jungle






Jungle is getting pretty thick





A pretty little waterfall





Decided to go to David for the night as I couldn’t figure out if there were any towns within a short distance down the coast. Based on the traffic coming into David, it will be a long day tomorrow.

Massive black clouds hangining over the city. Starts raining about 2 km before my turn. It is still pretty warm – 26 deg C (79F) and so I just left my mesh jacket on – felt nice. Once I got into town, it really opened up. Water was pouring off of the awnings over storefronts with such velocity it was spitting it out in the street in sheets. Finally saw a place called the Alcala and pulled in because: a) It looked like they had parking; b) They had a spiffy little driveway so I could get off the street and c) After driving around the city in this downpour for awhile, I was ready to stop.

Go into registration and water is literally pouring off of me – there is a big puddle forming around me. I’m sure some people just thought I was an old guy having an accident. Have everything I need (parking, wifi, hot water) for $34


Bet you didn't know these guys had gone to the street . . .



Yah, I know it's just fried chicken. But notice I'm going a bit high-brow here with a little freshly made Red Wine . . .



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Old 12-16-2012, 04:33 AM   #152
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Great updates Geezer.

But there was no little water fall in that picture above. Was that a test to make sure we are paying attention?


What a great adventure you are having. Is your wife going to join you at some point like the last trip?

Wishing you a continued safe journey.

Oh by the way, there is freezing rain out here this morning......
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Old 12-16-2012, 05:27 AM   #153
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Great updates Geezer.

But there was no little water fall in that picture above. Was that a test to make sure we are paying attention?


What a great adventure you are having. Is your wife going to join you at some point like the last trip?

Wishing you a continued safe journey.

Oh by the way, there is freezing rain out here this morning......
Front of the class there Sunday Yes, there are many hidden challenges in this ride report to test your attentiveness and comprehension or alternatively, to find my screw ups . . .

I am having a huge amount of fun and the trip has been an amazing experience. Yes my wife will join me in Ecuador right at the first of the year - I'm really looking forward to that.

Freezing rain? I'm finding down here that I many times have to put a liner in my mesh jacket because the temps may drop down below 20C, so your not the only one that has to deal with the cold.

Thanks for your well wishes
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Old 12-16-2012, 05:33 AM   #154
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Old 12-16-2012, 08:39 AM   #155
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IN!
Thanks for following along
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Old 12-16-2012, 09:20 AM   #156
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Dec 6 - Panama City

Got an early start this morning as I wasn’t sure how the traffic would be after the horrible traffic going into David yesterday. Would have a big day of riding if the roads are at all ratty.

Once I got to the turnoff to go east the traffic became reasonable and was able to make decent time. Pretty countryside, road fairly straight but pretty hills – as usual everything seems to always be green. Makes sense since it is the jungle.

Lots of cops along the road. See them standing at the side of the road, mostly moto-cops. I think they ride little 250s. Many of them waive as I go by. One guy was waiving pretty vigorously and since I had been stuck in the middle of a pack of cars for awhile I knew I wasn’t speeding for a change so, I waved back.

Apparently that was the wrong response and he actually wanted me to stop – who knew? He catches up with me a few km down the road, pulls me over and gives me crap for waving back at him. Tell him I thought he was just being friendly. Tells me I was speeding in an 80km zone which was crap as I was speeding for most of the day but at that particular moment in that pack of cars I wasn’t. Never did tell me how fast I was going.

Anyhow, we go around in circles for awhile and he tells me I’ll have to go back to Santiago to pay the fine but I don’t remember coming through a town called Santiago . That didn’t make me happy but I smiled (apparently that is what you are supposed to do to help diffuse the situation). Then he asks me if I want a ticket or do I want to pay. I ask him how far back the police station is again and now he tells me it’s in David (where I started this morning), about 3 hours back. Hmmm, stories are changing so I tell him I don’t want a ticket and I don’t want to pay. He shrugs and says ok, he’ll give me a ticket. Well fine! Be that way!

As I’m waiting I’m wondering if I can get out of the country before they catch up to me as he did take my passport info. Finally gives me a ticket and I ask again where I pay it and he now says in Santiago and points the other direction. Grrrr. Ok, see ya . . . . . !

Arrive in Santiago which turned out to be only about 10km down the road but I don’t see the Transito office so ride around town looking for a Transito (cop). Of course there are usually as many Transitos standing around in a town as there are Starbucks in Vancouver but today they are all hiding on me.

Finally come around a corner and see one of their motorcycles parked at the side of the road. Pull up and it turns out the operator of this fine machine is a Transita and when she turns around I’d swear to God, I thought it was Shania Twain in a uniform. So I babel to her that I need to pay this stupid ticket and ask where is the Transito office? She laughs at me and tells me to follow her. We roar up and down streets, through parking lots and down alleys and finally pop out at some nondescript building on a side street. I'd have never found it. Was hoping she would escort me inside so I would have time to grab a pic for you guys but no such luck.

Before I could pay my $20 fine, the ladies inside took forever as they had to basically make a new ticket as officer Barney hadn’t turned in the stub yet. Had to sit with one of them while she put all my passport info into their computer and asked a bunch of other info. At one point I thought she had asked me if I was tired – I kind of gave her a blank look because I couldn’t figure out why she needed to know if I was tired. The other two are killing themselves laughing. I said no, I wasn’t tired. Now they are laughing harder. Finally figured out that she was asking me if I was married – the Spanish word for tired and married are the same except “tired” has a “d” in it. Now the whole office was roaring and I gathered that really wasn't a question on the computer. A good example of how weak language skills can get one in a heap of trouble.

Get to Panama City and drive over the Centennial Bridge which crosses the Canal. As it turns out that is about as close as I will get to the famous canal.

Check into the Holiday Inn – pricy but next to the canal. Plan was to sort out my transportation stuff for shipping my bike with Girag and then walk over to the locks and watch the boats.

I’m thinking that shipping a bike on an airplane is not an insignificant deal and I probably should just touch base with the shipper beforehand to, you know, find out if I need a reservation, find out where they are, you know, stuff like that. Turns out trying to contact Girag wasn’t particularly straight forward. Had started emailing 4 days earlier and calling when I arrived in Panama City. Both emails and phones not answered. Eventually talked to a receptionist. Waiting for them to call back used up the afternoon sun so never made it over to the locks.

Serious need for beer and food. In that order. Go downstairs for some beer and chow and the restaurant is very nicely done. Two other people in the place that can sit about 150 and I go to sit at a table for 4 to get comfortable and the waiter has a bird and insists I sit at a little table. Hmmm, food is nicely presented . . . but, expensive . . . and, I’m not a fan of big hotel restaurants even when I have a suit on . . . sooooo, see ya . . . . . . .! Hey, I’m not grumpy . . . just that some people are really starting to piss me off.

Wander out the door and notice another fancy schmantzy place next door with an outside restaurant, a low murmur of voices wafting through the night air, the tinkle of glasses and silverware and Barry Manilow playing a bit too loud in the background (Note: Playing Barry Manilow at a volume exceeding 0 is too loud).

Look around a bit more and notice what looks like some sort of low building down in a hole on the other side of the parking lot. Well low and behold if it isn’t Mick’s Pub – had loud Rock and Roll, beer they let you drink from a bottle and huge hamburgers. It’s amazing how the simple things can greatly improve one’s attitude.




I could see the boats going by in the distance (just to prove I actually did see the canal) - from my room





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Old 12-16-2012, 01:25 PM   #157
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Dec 7 Over the Darien Gap

The reason I'm going through all these machinations to fly my bike from Panama and Colombia is about a 150 mile gap between the end of the road in Panama and the highway in Colombia. It is extremely inhospitable terrain and few people have crossed with vehicles. So, the three choices are: Boat, container or fly. After finding I didn't have a boat reservation, I decided just to get er done, fly over and be done with it.

Started the morning and still nothing from Girag. Finally decided to hell with it, packed up and headed out. I'll take my chances

I had booked a ticket to fly myself to Bogota this afternoon which can be re-booked if Girag doesn’t take my bike today.

My friend Pablo will be picking me up in Bogota so I’ll have to figure out how to get a message to him if I don’t fly today.

I know Girag doesn’t want any gas in the tank so I’m down pretty low. Last gas station I stopped at I bought ½ gallon – guy thought I was crazy – had to give me change for a $20. I think I have enough to get me to the airport and to a gas station once in Bogota but not much more. If I can’t get the bike delivered to Girag today, I’ll have to go back to a hotel and hopefully there is a gas station at the airport.

Still don’t know where Girag is but I found the general area for cargo so presumably they are there.

After talking to a couple of people found out that Panama has a nice toll road system that bypasses the congestion of the city. Panama City is quite big with an inordinate number of tall buildings – some quite unique. Didn’t immediately dawn on me why so many skyscrapers then realized most were banks with a lot of others relating to shipping companies.

Arrive at the airport and see a small sign for Carga. Follow the road around the airport. There was a ton of construction with only one lane open and insane traffic backed up most of the way. Ate more gas.

Finally get to the cargo area and it is a madhouse of trucks and cabs. Ask people where Girag was, some never heard of it (oh, good) but one guy finally told me where to go. He was also kind enough to show me where the Aduana was. Decided to check with Girag first to see if they can take my bike and then come back.

Arrive at Girag and the receptionist remembers my call from the previous afternoon. Lady I need to talk to is still tied up for awhile – I’ll wait. Another girl comes down and tells me the lady will still be awhile and she confirmed they can take my bike today so I decided to go back to the Aduana and get checked out.

Go to the Aduana and the various truck drivers debate which Aduana I should be at. They ask and the lady says here (first little building). Truckers tell me to step up to the window and give the lady my papers so I step up and shove my stuff through the hole in the window and tell the lady I need to check out and she just stares at me. Shove it in a little further and she finally takes it with a huff and disappears. Stand and sweat for awhile. Finally a little old lady sticks her head out and asks for the color or something and that is my cue to step inside – ahhhh, AC.

She finally gets it all done and signed off and I’m back to Girag. Stand around for another half hour and finally a guy who has been back and forth a couple of times, looks at me and tells me to come upstairs. Apparently the English speaking lady is still busy so he gives me to another lady who is quite put off that she has to deal with me but apparently this guy was some sort of boss, so she did. She speaks no English and didn’t seem too motivated to be patient as I can eventually figure most stuff out.

Takes all my info and gives it to another girl (who could speak English) who comes back after awhile and takes me next door to the cargo area. Stand around there for 20 minutes or so, am told I will have to pay $902 (which I knew) in cash when they get everything done. Finally another guy comes and gets me and tells me to move my bike into a compound. Then back to the office to stand around. Comes back to get me and I get what I want off the bike and lock it up. Back to the office to stand around for at least another half hour to 45 minutes. Finally another guy comes back with the relevant documents to take me next door to sign things off and get me to pay up. The cashier has now gone to lunch. I explain to him that I have a plane to catch and he thinks for a few seconds and tells me to pay him, he signs the documents and we are all good.

All together between Aduanas and Girag tover 3 hours. Total time from hotel to check in at the airport - 4 1/2 hours. Dealt with a total of 6 people at Girag and 3 at the Aduana – and I haven’t even got in to the next country yet.

Of course I’m still in my riding gear heading for the airplane. After over 2 months of accumulated nasties, both my pants and boots have pretty well taken on a life of their own. So when I got to the airport security, the guy, of course, wants me to take my boots off and put them in the scanner. Well, I try to warn him but he insists so, off they come. I swear to God, I looked at his face and he had tears welling up in his eyes. He kind of quickly pushed them into the machine and walked away.

Then metal detector guy wants to feel me up pat me down and just about has a bird over all the armor (Closed foam pads) in my hips and knees. I finally open my pant leg up (more olfactory fun and games) to show him and he starts ripping one of my knee pads apart – I’m pushing his hands away because these things are kind of important and he finally gives up and lets me carry on.

Straight forward flight to Bogotá and Pablo is there to pick me up. Unfortunately Girag won’t have my bike available to pick up until Monday (this is Friday) and Pablo offers to put me up at his house. Very cool!

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Old 12-16-2012, 03:28 PM   #158
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Dec 8 – 9 Bogota 1

Pablo was kind enough to not only put me up over the weekend but he and his family treated me like royalty looking after me.

On Saturday Pablo gave me the cooks tour of Bogota. It was a Religious holiday so everything was pretty quiet. Walked around the downtown, checked out some of the historic buildings, government buildings (Bogota is the capital of Colombia), a couple of museums and took the funicular up Monserrate.

Expansion of the east side of Bogota is blocked by steep mountains and Monserrate is the most prominent. It is home to a church on the top and is quite a popular destination for both locals and tourists. You can go to the top in a cable car or funicular – we went in the funicular.
Very steep grade as you can see in the distance (upper right corner of the picture)






There is less of a steep grade at the station resulting in the floor being tilted back when it leaves the station then it gets steeper. The lower section of track shown in the second picture is the same grade as in the first picture.








Beautiful view of this huge city of about 10 million people.








Couple of ladies with traditional hats and sweaters




Lots of food vendors behind the church. Interesting stuff – chickens, sausages and potatoes.





Chickens having a hot tub





Baked goods




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Old 12-16-2012, 04:35 PM   #159
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Dec 8 – 9 Bogota 2

Walking around town, a typical street with some heritage buildings



A little old and new





A cool door



Kind of an interesting looking building of no great importance - it was just neat looking






Colombia's White House - where El Presidente lives



The main square is very large and bordered by the Church and government buildings. Pretty quiet today. The church




Gummit buildings (there are a lot more government buildings throughout the downtown)



The inside of one of the many churches downtown - a lot of gold there. Hate to be the one that had to polish all that





An unusually fancy church - I notice churches in Central America and Colombia generally tend to be less ornate than many you see in Mexico




Stopped by the house of Simon Bolivar - he wasn't there . . . . He was considered the liberator of Colombia from the Spaniards - in fact, liberated everything from Venezuela to Colombia to Ecuador to Peru and Bolivia. Quite the guy. Unfortunately, the house was under renovation so we couldn't go in. Here is the front of the estate




Some of the gardens





Some of the weapons they would have used fighting the Spaniards - pretty ornate




I noticed people wearing these more traditional jackets/sweaters in rural areas. Bogota is at 8000 feet altitude so can be quite cool and noticed the odd one around the city

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Old 12-16-2012, 04:43 PM   #160
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Quote "Wander out the door and notice another fancy schmantzy place next door with an outside restaurant, a low murmur of voices wafting through the night air, the tinkle of glasses and silverware and Barry Manilow playing a bit too loud in the background (Note: Playing Barry Manilow at a volume exceeding 0 is too loud). "

Hey Rexbuck

Funny story about paying the ticket. I guess if you didn't pay you may have some issue getting out of the country i would assume. Sounds like you are riding some spectacular routes. Enjoy the great weather. Theres a foot of snow back here. A little something for you. This guy is really...WACKY...really man....

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Old 12-16-2012, 06:31 PM   #161
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Quote "Wander out the door and notice another fancy schmantzy place next door with an outside restaurant, a low murmur of voices wafting through the night air, the tinkle of glasses and silverware and Barry Manilow playing a bit too loud in the background (Note: Playing Barry Manilow at a volume exceeding 0 is too loud). "

Hey Rexbuck

Funny story about paying the ticket. I guess if you didn't pay you may have some issue getting out of the country i would assume. Sounds like you are riding some spectacular routes. Enjoy the great weather. Theres a foot of snow back here. A little something for you. This guy is really...WACKY...really man....




Hey Jick
He is just the coolest cat, man . . . My immediate reaction within oh, about 11 seconds . . . and I have a pretty strong stomach

With the ticket, hind sight being what it is, I could have made it out of the country before that ticket caught up with my passport. But, then I wouldn't have met Shania, etc

It's been phenomenal riding. And, it just gets better.

I'm really sad to miss the snow . . . really . . . no, really I do
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Old 12-16-2012, 06:41 PM   #162
Cal
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Rex
I'm following along, thanks for the reports.
Did you get to the Gold Museum in Bogota? It really is fantastic!
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Old 12-17-2012, 10:36 AM   #163
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Dec 8 – 9 Bogota 3

A few miles north of Bogota is the town of Zipaquira, home of the Salt Cathedral. Salt has apparently been extracted from here for over 2500 years, originally by the natives and then became much more developed once the Spanish arrived. Salt was of such great value as a resource to trade, that in the days of Bolivar it was used to help finance his wars with Spain. In the 30’s the miners built the first Sanctuary for them to pray for their safety. The first Cathedral was built in the 50’s but was shut down in the early 90’s because the mine was still active and the Cathedral was unstable. The current project was rebuilt 200 feet below the old one in the mid-90s.


At the entrance, you meet a modern miner / department store model. I'm the one on the right.





Obviously moisture seeping through the tunnel walls as there is a lot of crystaline salt formed closer to the surface






The mine consists of main tunnels with side tunnels where they extracted the raw salt. They have used those side tunnels to carve crosses and other religious icons and then installed a lot of creative colored lighting. It’s quite pretty.





Pablo and a couple of the salt crosses








The main Cathedral - they hold services here





Looking back in the main Cathedral - see two tunnels here, one on top of the other





Kind of hard to see but the green thing is a giant column at least 20' in diameter to help hold the roof of this chamber up





A monument built to honor the many miners killed here over the years





Down towards the bottom of the main tunnel, they have done some relief carvings in the salt walls that start at the floor and go all the way over the top to the other side.








Went to the Gold Museum which is a national museum housing primarily gold artifacts from the pre-Spanish days. You start to see why the Spanish were so interested in exploiting the region. The number of artifacts in the museum were mind numbing. Here are a few examples:









A gold helmet. The original beanie - didn't see a DOT sticker on it though so I'm sure it was worn just for trips to the bar or on Toy Runs.





They believed that when the chieftain covered himself in gold, he took on the powers of their gods. Hat with earrings you could use as cymbals in a band, breastplate, wrist and leg coverings and that thing on the left looks like some sort of weapon, a cane or a fire poker.






Some more examples of their craftsmanship in making very detailed small objects that all had religious and power significance for chieftains and high priests









Proof that aliens did arrive during this period. These chest plates with obvious communications receivers built in . . .





Masks - wouldn't you be the coolest kid on the block with a solid gold mask at Halloween?





A sarcophagus - found a lot of textiles and a number of identifiable grains in it. Would like to have known how this apparently wood object was preserved




This was a fascinating display of the important objects of these early societies.

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Old 12-17-2012, 10:38 AM   #164
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Rex
I'm following along, thanks for the reports.
Did you get to the Gold Museum in Bogota? It really is fantastic!
Hey Cal
Thanks for following along.

And, yes I did get to the Gold Museum . . .
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Old 12-17-2012, 01:12 PM   #165
RexBuck OP
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Joined: May 2010
Location: Interior BC, Canada
Oddometer: 930
Dec 8 – 9 Bogota 4

A couple of last things about Bogota.

I was so appreciative of my friend and Spanish teacher Pablo, his wife Leyffem and daughter Eliana for their very kind hospitality during my stay in Bogota. They kindly opened their house to me and included me some of their family events. Thanks so much.

Had some great traditional food while there. One dish was Sancocho de Gallina - a really tasty soup with a chicken leg and thigh that I think came off of Foghorn Leghorn. Delicious. Started off with some Empanadas and it was a massive amount of food I was actually unable to finish. Very unusual indeed.



Leyffem cooked up these tortilla eggs in the morning - eggs cooked up in a shape of a tortilla and put that on a tortilla, fold it in half and chow down. Have a glass of fresh juice and I'm actually eating a healthy and tasty breakfast.



Traffic in Bogota is absolutely insane and if you are on a motorcycle, my advice is to find a way to avoid it. By the end of the weekend here, I was having nightmares about riding my big, fat-assed bike through this traffic jam that acted like it was on amphetamines.

However, I have figured out the rules of driving here. If you are in mulit-lane traffic, you are required to try to move into any space that may be slightly ahead of your current position, whether there is a lane there or not. If you are merging into another lane or merging on to the highway, you are required to stick the nose of your vehicle in front of the vehicle you want to get in front of. You may honk your horn or wave your hand to signal your position of superiority. The other vehicle is required to try to maneuver around you and keep the nose of their vehicle in front of yours using a honk of their horn to signal their position of superiority and that they will do
whate
ver they can not to let you in. The overriding rule is that you can't run into another car. So, when it becomes clear that one car cannot get in front of the other without causing body damage, they must concede defeat, acknowledge the other vehicle is indeed superior and then challenge the next vehicle. This applies to buses and trucks also.

If you are seven cars back in a line of cars at a red light, the instant the light turns green you are to honk your horn. This applies particularly to taxis with passengers who need to make it look like they will get you there faster. I think we must send our politicians down here to drive taxi as a training exercise on how to give the illusion of doing something fantastic, really not doing anything special but still expecting to be paid for it.

All the while these maneuvers are going on, there are literally dozens of little 150 bikes and scooters zipping around like a swarm of mad hornets. On two wheels
, if there is a space you can fit through, you are to occupy it. Usually between lanes or on shoulders. If there is no immediate space available, you are to cut between the stopped vehicles in search of an open space you can occupy. In stopped traffic, two wheels is a big advantage.

Did notice this cop riding around on his scooter. Cool helmet also.


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