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Old 12-01-2012, 11:10 AM   #961
tee bee
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Sorry,its the coleman cobra...a really great tent.Luckily it didn,t rain...........
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Old 12-01-2012, 12:46 PM   #962
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Canuk View Post
How would you compare the X Challenge vs the the 570 Berg on a trip such as this one? If you were to do it over would you choose the same bike?
The X-Challenge is just an easy reliable choice.

The 570 is lighter, more powerful, faster and more of a handful. It would be a challenging choice, but not a bad one. To do three months day in day out on the Husaberg I would want different triple clamp offset, a steering stabiliser or both. Maybe some wrist braces. And still a lot of modifications (over and above the ones we have already made) to be bike required to make it suitable for this kinda trip.

I would like to do it. As a challenge. To see if the 570 could survive. Just looking at the bikes side by side as i did yesterday, everything from the swingarm, to the frame to the subframe is sooooo much lighter on the 570. I initially chose the XC a few years ago as a good basis for an adventure bike because it was so much lighter than just about anything else (but the 690 KTM) with the possibility to ride this kinda terrain on an around the world basis. Now that we at the Husaberg Adventure Team have done so many tough miles on the 570, it changes the picture. Great engine, great gearbox, better economy on fast terrain than I expected - it changes my perspective. The new Husaberg 501 is even more powerful, but getting more power out of smaller ccs is not necessarily a better thing for an adventure bike - unless there is a good upside like saving tons of weight which the 501 doesnt really do vs the 570. I am happy keeping the 570 rather than swapping it for a 501 because I am looking at adventure travel rather than pure enduro riding. The biggest challenge with the Husaberg is getting adventure parts for it. Fuel and fairings are still issues that we are struggling to address adequately.

Barton, our American team mate, rode one 20,000 miles from Chile back to Montana. Lukas our Austrian team mate is riding his 570 in the tuareg rally next year, then continuing across Africa on it - and then round the world. So we have a lot of confidence in the bike.

If we could only resolve the fuel and fairing situation we could have what I reckon is the best contender for a lightweight adventure bike platform.
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Old 12-01-2012, 12:58 PM   #963
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Day 40 - continued

After the irrigation ditch, we rode for another few kilometres until our path crossed an overflow channel for the irrigation route. It was a stream ... full of reeds and green slimy stinky algae. We had to cross it. The group assembled at the waters edge. I looked back at Beamster and smiled ... I knew she was going to hate this ... but it had to be done. Terry and I walked it and came back and declared it easy.

It was a cool little crossing but I cant find any pics or video of it. I am hoping one of my team mates pops up and says they have some.
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Old 12-01-2012, 01:30 PM   #964
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Before they do, can we talk bikes?

Quote:
Originally Posted by Colebatch View Post
Now that we at the Husaberg Adventure Team have done so many tough miles on the 570, it changes the picture. Great engine, great gearbox, better economy on fast terrain than I expected - it changes my perspective.

If we could only resolve the fuel and fairing situation we could have what I reckon is the best contender for a lightweight adventure bike platform.
Quote from http://www.advrider.com/forums/showthread.php?t=281742
Basically, wide gearbox bikes at the top.

Quote:
3.40 Husqvarna TE610 (6 speed) 17.16
3.40 Honda XR200R 1984 17.16
3.36 Yamaha WR250R/WR250X (6-speed) 16.99
3.32 Kawasaki KLR250 (6 speed) 16.76
3.29 Yamaha Tenere (5 speed) 16.61
3.27 BMW G650X (5 speed) 16.54
3.25 Pegaso 650 (5 speed) 16.41
3.19 Husqvarna 175XC 16.10
3.18 Kawasaki KDX200 (6 speed) 16.08
3.18 KTM 530 E/XC-R (6 speed) 16.07
3.18 Husaberg FE650E (6 speed) 16.07
3.18 Husaberg FE450/570 (6 speed) 16.07
Having ridden both Berg and X-Ch exhaustively, does the narrower gearbox still match your adventure riding purpose?
And you mentioned fuel economy - how do these two compare not only in fast stuff, but in crawling mud etc?

I'm surprised you didn't mention the Husqvarna TE610.
Slightly lighter than X-Ch as well, rotax powered, widest gearbox of the three...

Unfortunately, only XC comes with rear cush hub? I understand this as an important issue considering the durabily an adv bike requires!
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Old 12-01-2012, 02:17 PM   #965
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Colebatch View Post
After the irrigation ditch, we rode for another few kilometres until our path crossed an overflow channel for the irrigation route. It was a stream ... full of reeds and green slimy stinky algae. We had to cross it. The group assembled at the waters edge. I looked back at Beamster and smiled ... I knew she was going to hate this ... but it had to be done. Terry and I walked it and came back and declared it easy.

It was a cool little crossing but I cant find any pics or video of it. I am hoping one of my team mates pops up and says they have some.
Sorry no pics from that crossing !
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Old 12-01-2012, 03:07 PM   #966
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Originally Posted by Bli55 View Post
Having ridden both Berg and X-Ch exhaustively, does the narrower gearbox still match your adventure riding purpose?
The difference in gearbox width between the Berg and the XC is negligible. All the gearboxes in that shortlist youposted are nice and wide. Its gearboxes like on the DR650 or KTM 690 that are too narrow in my opinion. Sure, both the Husaberg and the XC could be a touch wider, but they among the widest of all 600-650cc bikes. There are far more 600-650cc bikes below them in that list, and only a couple above them, and only just above them. Well over half of bikes above them on the list are 250cc or less (some 75cc bikes listed there). Pretty much all the mainstream 600-650cc bikes are below them ... the F650dakar, the KTM 690, the DR650, the KLR650, the XR650L, XR650R etc

Quote:
Originally Posted by Bli55 View Post
And you mentioned fuel economy - how do these two compare not only in fast stuff, but in crawling mud etc?
The Berg is a lot better than its carbed predecessors like the KTM 530. But consumption goes up more in the Berg in technical terrain than it does on the Rotax bike.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Bli55 View Post
Unfortunately, only XC comes with rear cush hub? I understand this as an important issue considering the durabily an adv bike requires!
Yes it is very important ... but its an easy alteration - I already have a cush drive hub on my Husaberg. One of the first changes
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Old 12-01-2012, 03:36 PM   #967
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Love your ride reports Walter.. I have been considering getting rid of my R1200GSA for a X-challenge/country for the last couple of years since I started reading your adventures.. The ride up to 21,000 feet was the final straw for my buying my 570. Hoping to do the TAT on the 570 next year... keep up the great work, and come up with some cool mods for the 570 you seem to have a lot of influence on folks making these bikes adventure worthy.
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Old 12-02-2012, 03:45 AM   #968
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Was hoping Terry might have some pics from the slimy algae swamp crossing, But havent heard from him in a day or so so lets move on.

We hit the double track trails, and the speed picked up. Rod's bike hadnt faulted since leaving Astana ... the world was good.



Despite it being just the 2nd day on the bikes since Astana, Beamster was rocking along, getting up above 115 km/h (72 mph) on the GPS on the double track already.

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Old 12-02-2012, 03:49 AM   #969
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We had some stretches on remote asphalt roads ... they kinda looked like gravel roads from the satellite pics ...

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Old 12-02-2012, 03:58 AM   #970
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Day 40 - Damn hot

Then it was time for some gravel roads:



It was around 37 degrees (100F) on this day and we needed to stop to cool down in a bus shelter



We began to have a few bike problems. The fuel system on the KTM was playing up occasionally. We had to stop from time to time. It seemed to work better after giving the fuel pump time to rest. It was one of the reasons we pulled over.

Terry too was having issues. There is a problem with the wiring into the fuel tank on the XC bikes. Mine had been bypassed after I had problems with it 3 years ago. Now it was Terry's turn.



It was steaming hot inside synthetic motorcycle pants ... so the team employed a standardised ventilation and cooling proceedure ... drop your pants and let the breeze run through your sweaty underwear - very effective ....

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Old 12-02-2012, 04:55 AM   #971
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That the trouble with the synthetic stuff, it doesn`t breath, and woolen or polyproylene long johns can be hot also. Wouldn`t it be nice if someone made mesh long johns, that would keep the synthetic gear off the skin, but allowed some air to circulate. You wouldn`t want to flash them in public though. :ymca
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Old 12-02-2012, 05:00 AM   #972
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Classic!! Last shot of the update, you guys standing around in the middle of nowhere in your underwear!!! Adventure riding at it's best!!!!!
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Old 12-02-2012, 05:16 AM   #973
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Originally Posted by GSD4ME View Post
That the trouble with the synthetic stuff, it doesn`t breath, and woolen or polyproylene long johns can be hot also. Wouldn`t it be nice if someone made mesh long johns, that would keep the synthetic gear off the skin, but allowed some air to circulate. You wouldn`t want to flash them in public though. :ymca
Cool max or the temperature controlled clothing range from Helly Hansen are some examples of just such an item used in a vast arrange of sporting apparel - any good outdoor shop will help you out.
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Old 12-02-2012, 05:36 AM   #974
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Cool max or the temperature controlled clothing range from Helly Hansen are some examples of just such an item used in a vast arrange of sporting apparel - any good outdoor shop will help you out.
you guys missed the point. their PANTS didn't breathe, not their underclothes.
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Old 12-02-2012, 06:45 AM   #975
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Originally Posted by GSD4ME View Post
That the trouble with the synthetic stuff, it doesn`t breath, and woolen or polyproylene long johns can be hot also. Wouldn`t it be nice if someone made mesh long johns, that would keep the synthetic gear off the skin, but allowed some air to circulate. You wouldn`t want to flash them in public though. :ymca
The synthetic gear I was referring to are riding suits. You aren't getting away from synthetic on that stuff
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