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Old 11-20-2013, 07:38 PM   #1
coppertop OP
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so, how hot do these regulator/rectifiers get, normally?

Still chasing electrical gremlins in my '86 XL600R. I've redone the connections between the Ricky's hot-shot stator, the Electrosport regulator-rectifier and the wiring harness. I replaced the stock fuse holder (corroding away) with a fuse holder that takes an automotive blade-type fuse. The 10 amp fuse kept blowing, but I could not find a cause. I bumped up to a 15 amp fuse, and now, when I start the bike, the idiot lights, brake light and turn signals all work great, but after traveling a block or so, the turn signals won't light and the neutral indicator lamp is either not lighting or is so dim it makes no difference. I stop the bike, check the fuse, it is OK. Restart the bike, and Oh look! the turn signals work again! (until I've driven another block.

I checked the DC voltage going to the battery eliminator, and it seemed awfully low at idle (7 to 8 volts?). I touched the regulator-rectifier and it seemed pretty dammed hot to me. II know they've got cooling fins on them for a reason, but is this normal?

Next time I get a chance, I'll check the stator output, but I've got a leaky petcock that'll have to get fixed first.
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Old 11-20-2013, 09:15 PM   #2
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A bad chassis ground maybe? Run another jumper wire from battery neg to the chassis to find out.
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Old 11-20-2013, 09:23 PM   #3
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Not sure how hot they get, but I'd assume less than 200 degrees. You could use a infrared thermometer to see how hot the sink gets. I've tried a 12V muffin fan screwed right to the sink before to help cooling. You can use silicone compound to help dissipate heat with the mounting bracket too.
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Old 11-20-2013, 09:34 PM   #4
Warin
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If the fuse should be 10Amps ..and it blows .. then you have a fault!!! Replacing it with a 15Amp one just masks the problem and puts the extra strain elsewhere (probably a more expensive elsewhere).

Electrical things getting hot means they are dissapating energy ... if they get to hot to hold your hand on then that is too hot for me ... the hotter they get the more likly they are to fail.
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Old 11-20-2013, 09:36 PM   #5
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Notabiker View Post
A bad chassis ground maybe? Run another jumper wire from battery neg to the chassis to find out.
+1. If the fuse holder was corroding away, there's likely more corrosion in there. It's a good idea to go through all your connectors anyway, so that you reduce system resistance (which helps maintain system voltage, reduces heating, and other good stuff).

Good luck!
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Old 11-21-2013, 06:21 PM   #6
coppertop OP
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You may be on to something there...

When I cut the stock fuse holder out of the wiring harness and spliced the new one in, I had to cut one wire back over 3 inches to get to copper that wasn't corroded so badly I couldn't get it to take solder. I'll try putting in a known good ground from the battery eliminator negative to the frame to see if that helps. I'll go back to 10 amp fuses too, I promise.

I wonder if an iffy ground connection contributed to the original stator going bad? The stock regulator/rectifier got toasted immediately after installing the new stator, but it's funny that the regulator/rectifier blew out before the 10 amp fuse.

Thanks for the input, guys. I'll let you know what happens.
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Old 11-21-2013, 07:29 PM   #7
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Put a battery in it for testing. The RR wants to see a load and the battery also absorbs any stray ac.
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Old 11-23-2013, 12:01 AM   #8
hpsVFR
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Quote:
Originally Posted by coppertop View Post
When I cut the stock fuse holder out of the wiring harness and spliced the new one in, I had to cut one wire back over 3 inches to get to copper that wasn't corroded so badly I couldn't get it to take solder.


Check the entire harness, and ideally meter for resistance and voltage drop. That sounds like some super-duper nasty corrosion. The 7-8V going to your battery indicator is another sign that your wiring is in very, very bad shape, whether it's bad grounds or more wiring corroded inside the insulation.
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Old 12-03-2013, 08:11 AM   #9
serkan90
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@coppertop, the issue you are facing has been correctly identified, it's a bad sink. Or in simpler words, bad grounding to the chassis which heats up the components in sometime and you are left with these issues. Normally at any loom connector, a ground/earth wire travels through the shielding of the loom and connects the two metal connectors on either side of the loom. The issue you are facing is that electronics in your vehicle doesn't have the luxury of this sink which heats it up and there is no way that the heat can get dissipated and the circuitry fails. Hope you find the issue in your looming/wiring soon.

electronic contract manufacturer

serkan90 screwed with this post 12-13-2013 at 02:45 PM
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Old 12-03-2013, 07:32 PM   #10
coppertop OP
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I hope so, too

I have added a digital multimeter to my tool collection, and will check the wiring harness, grounds, etc. as soon as I can, which may be measured in weeks. Fortunately, if the weather turns warm in the interim, I do have another bike to ride. Thanks for all the input, folks! I will report back in this thread when I've something worth sharing. (hopefully, that the problem is cured!)
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Old 12-03-2013, 07:54 PM   #11
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Quote:
Originally Posted by serkan90 View Post
Normally at any loom connector, a ground/earth wire travels through the shielding of the loom and connects the two metal connectors on either side of the loom. The issue you are facing is that electronics in your vehicle doesn't have the luxury of this sink which heats it up and there is no way that the heat can get dissipated
Oh dear. I've yet to see a motorcycle harness that uses a shield either for heat or electromagnetics. They all use a ground wire .. but it is a simple wire, good for dc not rf nor heat. Electronic boxes fitted to motorbikes and cars and trucks don't use wires to remove heat - they bolt to some metal surface for that, like a frame. There were some loom pieces that were available for emergency vehicles that had RF shielding .. but it was on the ignition circuit not the alternator circuit (seen in the parts diagrams).

Coppertop - what caused the corrosion? Maybe the bike has been immersed and if might be best to replace the loom. Find out how much it costs .. sometimes they are cheap... Good luck.
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Old 06-06-2014, 06:39 PM   #12
coppertop OP
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thread resurrection time!

Yes, it can take me a long time to sort things out.

The root cause of this trouble was at least one crappy connection between the stator and the wiring harness that I missed on the previous go-arounds. After sorting all the connections and wiring harness stuff out with a handful of fresh connectors, a soldering iron and a couple of evenings with my new digital multimeter, the bike was still blowing the 10 amp fuse. Turns out that missed crap connection killed the new regulator/rectifier too. Now that I have replaced that, I am having no problems with the fuse, lights, or horn.

I'll take the blame for not performing a thorough check before running the bike after plugging the various aftermarket parts into the wiring harness. It doesn't pay to get in too much of a hurry.
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Old 06-06-2014, 08:52 PM   #13
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Quote:
Originally Posted by serkan90 View Post
@coppertop, the issue you are facing has been correctly identified, it's a bad sink. Or in simpler words, bad grounding to the chassis which heats up the components in sometime and you are left with these issues. Normally at any loom connector, a ground/earth wire travels through the shielding of the loom and connects the two metal connectors on either side of the loom. The issue you are facing is that electronics in your vehicle doesn't have the luxury of this sink which heats it up and there is no way that the heat can get dissipated and the circuitry fails. Hope you find the issue in your looming/wiring soon.

electronic contract manufacturer
I do hope that your just a contract spammer and not an actual manufacturer of electronic components, because you don't seem to know jack shit about either thermodynamics or electrical theory.
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Old 06-07-2014, 10:57 AM   #14
hpsVFR
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Quote:
Originally Posted by coppertop View Post
Yes, it can take me a long time to sort things out.

The root cause of this trouble was at least one crappy connection between the stator and the wiring harness that I missed on the previous go-arounds. After sorting all the connections and wiring harness stuff out with a handful of fresh connectors, a soldering iron and a couple of evenings with my new digital multimeter, the bike was still blowing the 10 amp fuse. Turns out that missed crap connection killed the new regulator/rectifier too. Now that I have replaced that, I am having no problems with the fuse, lights, or horn.

I'll take the blame for not performing a thorough check before running the bike after plugging the various aftermarket parts into the wiring harness. It doesn't pay to get in too much of a hurry.
Glad you got it sorted out!
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