ADVrider

Go Back   ADVrider > Riding > Ride reports
User Name
Password
Register Inmates Photos Site Rules Search Today's Posts Mark Forums Read

Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread Display Modes
Old 02-01-2013, 06:28 PM   #976
Mossy-Back
Wet-Sider
 
Mossy-Back's Avatar
 
Joined: Jun 2012
Location: Corvallis, OR
Oddometer: 1,515
Dangit! You can't leave us hanging like that!
__________________
Evan
2013 Husqvarna Strada
'93 XR650L (Gone, but missed)
Ooh-Rah! Once a Marine, always a Marine!
Quote:
Originally Posted by kenny61 View Post
figures...my stud was rusty I played with my nuts a little and it cranked right over
Mossy-Back is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-01-2013, 06:33 PM   #977
Spud Rider
Beastly Adventurer
 
Spud Rider's Avatar
 
Joined: Jun 2008
Location: Idaho
Oddometer: 3,642
Quote:
Originally Posted by Brown Falcon View Post
Dangit! You can't leave us hanging like that!
He just did.

Spud
__________________
2005 XR650L: Shorai Battery Relocation, Spud Oil Cooler, XR650R C/S Sprocket, Reinforced Subframe, Chain Slipper Roller, Performance Design Lowering Link, Baja Designs Headlight, FMF Hi-Flo Header, ManRacks SD Rack, ManRacks Front Fender Farkle, CST Surge I Front Tire, D952 Rear Tire, Tusk D-Flex Handguards, Uni Air Filter, No-Toil Evolution air filter oil
Spud Rider is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-01-2013, 06:52 PM   #978
Ulyses OP
Studly Adventurer
 
Ulyses's Avatar
 
Joined: Mar 2012
Location: Oregon (the dry side)
Oddometer: 891
Quote:
Originally Posted by gnadenlos View Post
I have just been reading your post... thanks!
Wish I would of seen it before - could of shown ya around Cambria!
Great trip - great post!
Damn! Did you go to the HU conference?
Ulyses is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-01-2013, 06:54 PM   #979
Ulyses OP
Studly Adventurer
 
Ulyses's Avatar
 
Joined: Mar 2012
Location: Oregon (the dry side)
Oddometer: 891
Quote:
Originally Posted by Brown Falcon View Post
Dangit! You can't leave us hanging like that!


That's it for tonight. I'm going to drink some beer and get some sleep. More tomorrow.
Ulyses is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-01-2013, 09:35 PM   #980
purpledrake
No Pretensions
 
Joined: Jul 2010
Location: Seattle-ish
Oddometer: 335
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ulyses View Post


That's it for tonight. I'm going to drink some beer and get some sleep. More tomorrow.
What? Like Brown Falcon just said....

Somebody go wake him up!
__________________
The Good Lord gave most of us 10 digits; mine are all thumbs.
purpledrake is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-02-2013, 05:56 AM   #981
crashmaster
ow, my balls!
 
crashmaster's Avatar
 
Joined: Mar 2007
Location: Girdweed, AK
Oddometer: 5,008
That's great you did the lagunas route. Epic Bolivia riding.
__________________
Riding the Americas: No Fumar Español
_____________________________________________

crashmaster is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-02-2013, 06:14 AM   #982
Ulyses OP
Studly Adventurer
 
Ulyses's Avatar
 
Joined: Mar 2012
Location: Oregon (the dry side)
Oddometer: 891
Bolivia to Chile via the Lagunas Route: Day 1

Day 108 (January 30, 2013)
Unuyi, Bolivia to Unnamed Lagoon, Bolivia
Day's Ride: 140 Miles



Leaving Unuyi, we made a quick stop at the Train Graveyard. I'm not sure on the story behind this place; however, just outside of Unuyi is the "Cemetario de Trenes" where they've left tons of old engines and cars to rust.





We hung around for a few minutes taking pictures, but I started getting worried about picking up a flat from all of the rusty metal lying around and we soon jetted out of the graveyard and cut across the desert scrub to the main road. The main road south out of Unuyi to San Cristobal (the last gas and last town of any size in our route) was beautfiul graded gravel.



The road was relatively smooth; however, the new knobies combined with the occasional rut caused my rear to sway a bit as we blasted along at 60mph.

We stopped in San Cristobal had our tanks topped off by an wizened old man with a massive wad of coca leaves in his mouth. I tightened a spoke on my rear wheel and then we were off again. Mike was super stoked to be heading off into the Bolivian wilderness on a beautiful dirt road:



The road passed through several small collections of huts and buildings before begining to climb towards some distant volcanos. Soon we were passing through massive rock gardens that were very reminicent of Joshua Tree National Park.



I decided to ride up into the rocks and hide from Mike. See if you can spot me:



We left the rocks and and continued down the road.



Soon came to our turn off. We left the main road and jumped out onto a small side track. As we continued to climb up higher into the alitplano, the weather began to look ominous. As we were already above 14,000 feet, I decided it would be a good idea to put on some rain gear and make some adjustments to the mixture screw on my carberuator.



The road soon devolved into a muddy track strewn with baseball sized rocks, deep ruts, and sand.



Mike's massive BMW soon became a little tought to handle.





Eventually we came to a stream crossing. Out of the graciousness of my heart, I decided to let Mike go first while I recorded the result for posterity. He was doing great until he hit that hole that was hidden under the water....



After helping him right his bike, I walked the ground a little until I was confident that I had a good line on relatively dry and stable ground. I went back to my bike and made my attempt.....









After scrapping off some of the mud and collecting my wounded pride, Mike helped me stand my bike up and I rode out of the quagmire.

As we continued on, the scenery just kept getting better. Just down the road we came across a group of llamas and Mike stopped to take a picture. I took a picture of Mike taking a picture:



The road continued up through a pass between two sets of volcanos; by this time, the road was mostly a first and second gear crawl. At some points we simply skipped the road altogether and rode through the scrub.





Finally the road dropped down out of the pass and we came across our first lagoon, complete with bright blue water and pink flamingos:



Turning south, we began to skirt a series of lagunas and dry salt flats.







Eventually we came by a laguna named after my bike and I was forced to stop and get a picture.



Just in case you can't read it, it says "Laguna Honda".

By now it was starting to get late and we began hunting for a campsite. Eventually we came across a small, isolated laguna a few kilometers away from the main track, complete with snow capped mountains, mirror like water, and grazing flamingos.





Mike set up his tent while I started working on dinner. The beauty of having a multi fuel stove is that you can fill it up off of just about anything....



After priming the stove, I started to work on the veggies. Luckily our campsite came complete with a cutting board...





After dinner we kicked back and watched the sun go down beside our private lagoon as the flamingos skwaqued and kaad in the background.



All in all it was a hell of a way to start this leg of the trip. 140 miles of straight dirt riding on every type of terrain imaginable. We even got snowed on a little bit. Despite dropping my bike a few times, I had zero mechanical difficulties and no injuries. Mike also dropped his bike a few times and other than a slightly sprained ankle from the stream crossing, he was doing okay. We were stoked from the awesome riding, but still very tired. The last 40 miles had been rather rough and we were more than ready to drop off to sleep after the sun went down.

Ulyses screwed with this post 02-02-2013 at 06:20 AM
Ulyses is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-02-2013, 08:51 AM   #983
Ulyses OP
Studly Adventurer
 
Ulyses's Avatar
 
Joined: Mar 2012
Location: Oregon (the dry side)
Oddometer: 891
Bolivia to Chile via the Lagunas Route: Day 2

Day 109 (January 31, 2013)
Unnamed Lagoon to Laguna Colorada, Bolivia
Day's Ride: 49 Miles



Waking up around 6:00 AM with a slight headache from the elevation, I walked up the hill above our campsite to snap a few shots of our spot.



Man, we really had a great spot. With the flamingos squawking in the background, we set about striking camp and preparing breakfast. Before long we were back on the road heading south.



Actually, most of the time there wasn't much of a road to speak of. You simply chose a likely patch of gravelly sand and pointed your front end in the direction that you wanted to travel.



I've heard people say that their dream is to ride a dirt bike on a golf course. I say you can keep the golf course; give me a mile wide patch of three inch deep sand on top of a layer of firm dirt with no tracks and no one else around! It's like skiing powder! I was having a blast making huge sweeping turns, carving beautiful lines at 50 MPH through virgin soil, feeling the front end float on top and the back end churning down to the bottom.



Of course, all good things must come to an end, and before long we found that the Land Cruisers had had the same idea: the whole sandy plain was soon covered by the ruts of passing tourist wagons.



This slowed things down considerable. Riding in smooth wide open sand is easy; riding in sandy ruts is hard as hell!



Still, occasionally an open untracked patch of sand could be found. Mike and I were riding parallel to each other but were often separated by over a mile across the plain as we each tried to locate a patch untracked ground. We constantly varied between 1 st gear crawls through sandy ruts and 5th gear slaloms through fresh fields of sand.



After climbing up one particularly beautiful dune, I stopped to get off my bike for a picture and found that disaster had struck:



I guess I shouldn't have been surprised; this is typically what happens when I do a bunch of dirt riding. Still, I had done the Santa Theresa road twice and the Death Road once with no issues; I suppose that those little jaunts lulled me into a false sense of security.

This little break looked especially bad because it was so close to the frame that there didn't appear to be any way to splint it. Luckily for me, Mike had a 1/4 inch drive extension for his ratchet that fit perfectly inside the tubing.



Using a ratchet strap we were able to tension the luggage rack back together and then we got to work trying to stabilize everything. Mike saved the day again with his amazing bailing wire skills.



As you can see, we had to get a little creative to brace this up. Using a copious amount of bailing wire, a few zip ties, a 1/4 inch ratchet extension, a tire iron, a ratchet strap, and some duck tape, we managed to put Humpty Dumpty back together again.



After giving it a few wobbles to see how it was holding up, it felt like the rack was actually stronger in this configuration than it had been before it broke.

We got back on the trail and I commenced riding like a grandma, wincing at every little divot or washboard that I struck, praying fervently that the rest of the bike would hold up long enough to get out of the wilderness and back into civilization, a scant 160 miles of dirt tracks and washboard roads away.

After riding a few miles with the new system in place, my confidence increased slightly and I sped up a little. Mike was having some difficulties piloting his machine through the sandy ruts.



Knowing how sloppily my 650cc Honda was handling in the ruts, I can't imagine how his massive 1150cc BMW was doing; it must have been horrible.



Early in the afternoon we reached the "Arbol de Piedra" (Tree of Rock). Right as we pulled up four Land Cruisers materialized out of the desert and the rock was swarmed with tourists. We were having a hard time getting a clear picture and eventually we had to yell (politely of course) at everybody and ask them if they wouldn't mind standing clear for a few seconds so we could get a good picture. Our request was only moderately successful and Mike started getting pissed. I believe his exact words were: "I didn't ride for three months and over 10,000 miles through Central and South America to get to this point and let a bunch of assholes ruin my day!" Actually, those weren't his exact words, but that was the gist of it. Well said Mike, well said.



Eventually we got everyone out of the way and were able to take a few good pictures. I was tempted to go find a good bouldering problem on it until I saw this nearby sign:



Apparently climbing on the Tree of Rock has been a problem in the past. After the arbol, it was a short jaunt down into Laguna Colorada. Starting at Laguna Colorada, we would be riding in a large Bolivian National Park and we had to stop at the entrance and pay a small fee.



While Mike was paying his fee, I started chatting with one of the Park Rangers about my bike problems. After I showed him where my luggage rack had broken, he sparked up and told me that there was a guy with a welder and a full shop just down the road near the hotel. Jackpot!

Once again, you can find a welder just about anywhere down here. Either that, or I just have amazing luck at finding welders in random places. Who would have guessed that I would find someone who could weld out in the middle of the altiplano, nearly 200 miles away from the nearest village?

I went and found the welder, Edgar, who told me that he could fix me up but that I would have to wait until the generators came on around 6:00 PM. Mike and I rode over to the nearby Hotel and asked if we could sit inside out of the wind and have lunch.



Returning at 6:00 PM, Edgar lead us over to his shop and I explained what I wanted done. First I had him grind down a small piece of rebar to fit inside the tubing and serve as an internal gusset.



Next I had him weld all around the break. Finally, I had him weld a few nails along the outside of the tubing to serve as further reinforcement.



He did a pretty damn good job and wouldn't take any money from me. I finally convinced him to take 100 Bolivianos and had him sign my gas tank.



With the luggage rack repaired, Mike and I decided to go back to the Hotel and spend the night. We had originally planned to make it all the way to Laguna Verde and camp; however, the sandy riding and the time spent repairing my bike had nullified that possibility and we decided that it would be best just to hunker down where we were for the night.
Ulyses is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-02-2013, 09:04 AM   #984
PDX Alamo
Gnarly Adventurer
 
PDX Alamo's Avatar
 
Joined: May 2012
Location: Portland, OR
Oddometer: 300
Talking Jesus

Wow man, unbelievable pics. Just wanted you to know I've been inspired by your trip so much I am going to Guatamala to learn Spanish for a month this week in prep for my own next year. In case some people in a gondola want to talk trash about my beard im ready . These pics are some of the most surreal yet and I'll be in Antigua so if you have some suggestions from your Guatamala adv let me know.O and ill find that El Pescador Captain and give him a mustache sticker for the front of his boat.

PDX Alamo screwed with this post 02-02-2013 at 09:16 AM
PDX Alamo is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-02-2013, 09:35 AM   #985
Hevy Kevy
ADDRider
 
Hevy Kevy's Avatar
 
Joined: Sep 2010
Location: Aboyne
Oddometer: 179
Dude, I've been following you and Kedgi for a while. Currently involved in a great self debate, KLR or XR...hmm! I won't ask either of you 'cause... well, you know, that bias thing. Leaning to the XR though..I like red
Hevy Kevy is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-02-2013, 09:58 AM   #986
WhicheverAnyWayCan
Deaf Biker
 
Joined: Dec 2011
Location: Seven Springs NC
Oddometer: 742
Epic ride! Decent riding report.. just got caught up!
WhicheverAnyWayCan is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-02-2013, 10:26 AM   #987
Ulyses OP
Studly Adventurer
 
Ulyses's Avatar
 
Joined: Mar 2012
Location: Oregon (the dry side)
Oddometer: 891
Quote:
Originally Posted by PDX Alamo View Post
Wow man, unbelievable pics. Just wanted you to know I've been inspired by your trip so much I am going to Guatamala to learn Spanish for a month this week in prep for my own next year. In case some people in a gondola want to talk trash about my beard im ready . These pics are some of the most surreal yet and I'll be in Antigua so if you have some suggestions from your Guatamala adv let me know.O and ill find that El Pescador Captain and give him a mustache sticker for the front of his boat.
Wow man, you are really taking the plunge!! Way to go! If you want to save some money, go to San Pedro on Lake Atitlan to do your Spanish Course. I was paying $3.50 a night for my hotel there. And it was a decent hotel too. I think the Spanish course was only $90 a week there as well. Also, I've heard that Xela is cheaper than Antigua as well.

Hell, if you're going to be there for a month, you should hit up all three spots: Xela, Lake Atitlan, and Antigua. Antigua is really cool, but it's also where all of the rich people from Guatemala ctiy go on the weekend, so prices are a bit steeper there. But really, everywhere you go in Guatemala will be cheeper than the States.

Man, I'm stoked for you! Have fun! You should rent a bike while you are there!
Ulyses is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-02-2013, 10:33 AM   #988
cymruduc
Lost In Translation
 
cymruduc's Avatar
 
Joined: Oct 2008
Location: New Braunfels, Texas
Oddometer: 34
Awesome Trip Report

Bryce,

I have thrown a few dollars your way for beer and McDonalds. Enjoying the report
and pics.

Jim in Texas
__________________
02 Ducati ST4s
Buy the ticket take the ride. Hunter S. Thompson
cymruduc is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-02-2013, 10:37 AM   #989
Ulyses OP
Studly Adventurer
 
Ulyses's Avatar
 
Joined: Mar 2012
Location: Oregon (the dry side)
Oddometer: 891
Quote:
Originally Posted by Hevy Kevy View Post
Dude, I've been following you and Kedgi for a while. Currently involved in a great self debate, KLR or XR...hmm! I won't ask either of you 'cause... well, you know, that bias thing. Leaning to the XR though..I like red
Dude, I wouldn't go with either of them. You should do it on a Harley with a sidecar!

Seriously though, the KLR might be a better choice. Not that it's a better bike, but it will be a hell of a lot easier to get parts for (should you need them) and there are a lot more accesories floating around out there, like solid luggage racks that don't break every two weeks (like mine). It won't handle as well in the dirt, but the majority of your time will be spent on pavement, unless you have some trans america dirt route that you aren't telling anybody about.....

Other great choices would be a DR650 or a VSTROM. Once again, easier to get parts for in South America and more accessories available. Various bike shop owners have told me that they actually manufacture DR650's, KLR's, and VSTROM's in South America. A lot of the Cop Bikes are represented by these three.

Still, the XR will do it and it's a blast when you are off the road. My only recomendation would be to use soft luggage like a Giant Loop or custom build your own luggage rack and subframe reinforcements.

Really, any bike you choose will be fine. There's a Canadian couple down here riding around on old 70's Yamaha XS650's that they fixed up. They leak oil everywhere, but they still go just fine.
Ulyses is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-02-2013, 10:49 AM   #990
Gale B.T.
Beastly Adventurer
 
Joined: Jun 2005
Location: Pagosa Springs, CO.
Oddometer: 1,444
I have been reading this day by day since you started and nothing in your trip to date has impressed me more than your pics/trip across this last open country. Great pics and descriptions of what you see and what is happening to you two.

Congrats,

Semper Fi
Gale B.T. is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Share

Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

.
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is On

Forum Jump


Times are GMT -7.   It's 05:03 AM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.5
Copyright ©2000 - 2014, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
Copyright ADVrider 2011-2014