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Old 03-23-2014, 04:01 PM   #1
unibox OP
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Front brake tare down. Stuck removing the pipe.

It all started with wanting to install new fork boots. Since I am got through that work I am checking the the brakes. I knew my right disc and pads were fouled so Im tracking it to leaking brake fluid. I thought it might be from the piston seal but after pulling the pads and checking the piston seal it is not bulging and seems fine. I want to pull the caliper and cleaned and was planning to get new seals for it since I have it off. I was able to get the bleed/vent screw to turn but not the lower pipe fitting. It seemed like it was slightly distorted and seems the source of the leak. I tried to turn it with a 11mm wrench which worked to the other fitting but it felt like it was stripping it.

Any ideas? It looks like that part is only 27.50 but I really wanted to keep the spend bill low.

Thanks in advance!

Andy


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Old 03-23-2014, 04:35 PM   #2
mendoje
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11mm open end wrench? No... use a flare nut wrench or sacrifice a box end wrench and make your own by cutting a slot just big enough to clear the brake line.
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Old 03-23-2014, 04:48 PM   #3
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if the upper fitting on the metal line will loosen, you can slide a box end wrench over and past it down to the fitting at the calipar..
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Old 03-23-2014, 04:57 PM   #4
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Quote:
Originally Posted by mendoje View Post
flare nut wrench
Great! Didn't even know to that was a thing. Thanks so much.
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Old 03-23-2014, 05:30 PM   #5
disston
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Don't order seals until you get the caliper apart and can see the condition of the piston. The pistons corrode or rust if very much water had been absorbed by the brake fluid and the pistons do not come with out the seals. That's the thing, if you buy the seals separate and not the pistons you can't later buy the pistons only, you will have to buy the seals again because they come with the pistons. You can buy only the seals and many riders do but discover later they also need pistons so we're back to....do not buy the seals until you have checked the pistons.

I think I have explained this plain enough. If this sounds silly or needs further explanation please PM me or just ask. Just trying to save you some time and money.
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Old 03-23-2014, 06:40 PM   #6
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Thanks disston, That is a great plan.
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Old 03-23-2014, 06:48 PM   #7
Jim Day
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Quote:
Originally Posted by unibox View Post
I was able to get the bleed/vent screw to turn but not the lower pipe fitting. It seemed like it was slightly distorted and seems the source of the leak. I tried to turn it with a 11mm wrench which worked to the other fitting but it felt like it was stripping it.

Any ideas?

It's not so much a wrench issue as it is your going to have to break it loose. On a normal bolt you could use a impact driver but that one has to take a wrench due to the tubing.

Take a long wrench put it on and then put pressure on it like your going to turn it loose using your left hand while leaving about a inch sticking out past your hand. Then whack the end of the wrench in the direction your pushing to break it loose. I use a dead blow hammer to do this but anything heavy will work in a pinch. What you want is a good clean smack and not a glancing or twisting blow and the fitting will come loose. A flare nut wrench will put more surface on it and help if it's worn but it's not usually necessary. You don't have to really go after just a good tap should do it.

Excuse me if you already know this because it is one of the oldest tricks in the book, but it sounded like you were just trying to pry it loose with pressure, and probably at least 50% of the time I've found I have to whack those fittings like a impact wrench if they have been sitting for any length of time.

Jim Day screwed with this post 03-23-2014 at 06:58 PM
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Old 03-23-2014, 07:24 PM   #8
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Thanks Jim, more info is better than less. I was trying to give it the impact trick but didn't want to force it too much without asking.
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Old 03-23-2014, 07:53 PM   #9
Jim Day
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Originally Posted by unibox View Post
Thanks Jim, more info is better than less. I was trying to give it the impact trick but didn't want to force it too much without asking.
Made you a little vid



Nothing to it once you've done it a few times. I completely understand though. Nothing worse then thinking something is frozen then finding you missed something or it's actually reverse threaded, and I hate damaging things or running up my budget unnecessarily. Some people really get off on replacing parts with new stuff, but for me less is more in that the less I spend on a given project the more projects I get to do.

Recently I couldn't get some r75/6 forks out of their triple tree because the threaded guide support" nuts wouldn't budge. These are at the top of the fork, thread into the tubes and then the caps thread into them. Evidently the factory torque on them is pretty over the top, and in the end I used a wrench, a cheater bar and a large hammer to break them loose. I think they are like $50 a piece if you can find them but you can't even get the originals anymore and the ones available won't take the original cap.

In the end they came out fine but it did make me nervous
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Old 03-24-2014, 03:32 AM   #10
chasbmw
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Heat is often a good friend when dealing with stuck nuts and bolts.

I use a Hot air gun....
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Old 03-24-2014, 03:42 AM   #11
Jim Day
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Originally Posted by chasbmw View Post
Heat is often a good friend when dealing with stuck nuts and bolts. I use a Hot air gun....

There you go.

On a caliper you can heat it up but you do not want to burn the residual brake fluid, or damage the seals. Heating the pipe an it's coupling will expand it and since it will cool faster then the caliper it will then loosen slightly. I know brake fluid is designed to take heat, but I would not use heat on a brake caliper unless I was going to rebuild it. That said heat is definitely your friend when you've got a stuck piston and are planning to rebuild the caliper.
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Old 03-24-2014, 12:58 PM   #12
BigAldo
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Can you undo the fitting at the other end of the pipe and slip a ring spanner all the way down the pipe to the caliper?
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Old 03-24-2014, 04:48 PM   #13
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Can you undo the fitting at the other end of the pipe and slip a ring spanner all the way down the pipe to the caliper?
Ha Ha Ha.... that is incredibly clever. I just checked mine and yes he can slide a 11mm box end over the other end down to the fitting at the caliper.
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Old 03-25-2014, 11:16 AM   #14
johnwgy
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You can buy prefab brake lines at any auto parts store if you end up ruining yours. You will have to bend it yourself to match but they are really cheap.
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