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Old 11-05-2012, 09:47 AM   #16
SloMo228
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ragtoplvr View Post
A guy I went to school with made a turn in front of a motorcyclist traveling at over 120 in a 45 zone. Of course it was fatal of the motorcyclist. He did not see him, and in this case he was not at fault. Someone at 120 covers a mile in 30 seconds, and when we look to turn on a 45 mph street very few of us look 1/4 mile or more down the road for a speeding motorcycle. And I really don't think we should have to. My old school mate was darn lucky he was not killed too, hit just far enough behind the cab he only got bruised up. Mashed in his old truck over half way and spun him around. I have heard he does not drive much anymore. Because of the bikers irresponsible actions this man is affected for the rest of his life too. I explained all this to him, no one, no one else ever took the time.

The charges agains thim were quickly drioopped when the speed of the motorcycle was determined. So that was fair.

If you want to speed, you have to pick your spots carefully. Those that don't are not of the faith and are not long for this world. Or Darwin candidates.

Rod
Definitely not always the rider's fault, as this shows. Unfortunately, the actions of a few brain-damaged individuals who see the roads as a public race track also cause the public to assume that it's the rider's fault whenever two and four wheels meet.
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Old 11-05-2012, 09:59 AM   #17
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ragtoplvr View Post
A guy I went to school with made a turn in front of a motorcyclist traveling at over 120 in a 45 zone. Of course it was fatal of the motorcyclist. He did not see him, and in this case he was not at fault. Someone at 120 covers a mile in 30 seconds, and when we look to turn on a 45 mph street very few of us look 1/4 mile or more down the road for a speeding motorcycle. And I really don't think we should have to. My old school mate was darn lucky he was not killed too, hit just far enough behind the cab he only got bruised up. Mashed in his old truck over half way and spun him around. I have heard he does not drive much anymore. Because of the bikers irresponsible actions this man is affected for the rest of his life too. I explained all this to him, no one, no one else ever took the time.

The charges agains thim were quickly drioopped when the speed of the motorcycle was determined. So that was fair.

If you want to speed, you have to pick your spots carefully. Those that don't are not of the faith and are not long for this world. Or Darwin candidates.

Rod
I've pretty well given up doing 'silly speed's', i'll admit that wasn't always the case. Bike's like zzr1100, i had in 92, well, anything less than 100mph, seemed like walking, beside's everything else thats wrong with excessive speed, i just dont have the head for it anymore
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Old 11-05-2012, 11:05 AM   #18
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Quote:
Weaving in your lane is still (and always was) the best way to avoid not being seen.


Check this out for an in-depth study.

http://www.network.mag-uk.org/smidsy...oo%20Close.pdf
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Old 11-05-2012, 11:28 AM   #19
jdfog2
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It has been said a large number of times before in other media and forums but I am CERTAIN that riding a motorcycle has really made me a much better car driver.

You get the experience of knowing bad things cagers will do when you're on a bike. Then, HOPEFULLY, you are mindful of those things when you are driving the cage (works for me anyway).

Too bad we can't get some of those lil rocket launchers on our bikes...(but then we'd run out of rockets very quickly)


Jay
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Old 11-05-2012, 11:44 AM   #20
WIDELOAD
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I always view any other road user...be they drivers or walkers (although the biggest problem here is incompetent riders on high powered motorcycles)...as unaware of my presence...its kept me alive...ride defensively...

A short film...which is very British...and hopefully very amusing...


http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=masAsJeyIVQ
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Old 11-05-2012, 12:22 PM   #21
Wuwei
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Here in farm country we have a problem with folks who just don't care. Between liquid cow manure spread liberally on the roads, stones and gravel on many corners from trucks taking the short route, and people hauling all sorts of strange loads you have to stay on your toes. How do you prevent one of these from pulling out of a side road without stopping and then proceed to advance towards you while covering most of the width of both lanes? Happened to me yesterday. I guess he felt he didn't have anything to worry about from a motorcycle. I left a fair bit of rubber on the road, but managed to slow up enough to swerve around him.
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Old 11-05-2012, 01:04 PM   #22
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Originally Posted by Wuwei View Post


Here in farm country we have a problem with folks who just don't care. Between liquid cow manure spread liberally on the roads, stones and gravel on many corners from trucks taking the short route, and people hauling all sorts of strange loads you have to stay on your toes. How do you prevent one of these from pulling out of a side road without stopping and then proceed to advance towards you while covering most of the width of both lanes? Happened to me yesterday. I guess he felt he didn't have anything to worry about from a motorcycle. I left a fair bit of rubber on the road, but managed to slow up enough to swerve around him.
I would go riding late at night during the summer, as the sun hardly sets here, we're about the same latitude as Alaska, so you can still see at 2am. It's great, no idiots in their cars to hasle you, have the road to yourself. One night i am blasting away, no traffic. Rounding this right hander, what the fooook, big harvester coming the other way, filling the road, left me just enough space to squeeze thru, ended my nightly rides for awhile
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Old 11-06-2012, 05:10 AM   #23
390beretta
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jdfog2 View Post
It has been said a large number of times before in other media and forums but I am CERTAIN that riding a motorcycle has really made me a much better car driver.

You get the experience of knowing bad things cagers will do when you're on a bike. Then, HOPEFULLY, you are mindful of those things when you are driving the cage (works for me anyway).

Too bad we can't get some of those lil rocket launchers on our bikes...(but then we'd run out of rockets very quickly)


Jay
I'll second this statement!
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Old 11-06-2012, 12:28 PM   #24
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If the driver is trained properly he can see a motorcycle.

It is way too easy to get a driver's license. and I know a couple people who can't pass the test for the life of them.

Quote:
Originally Posted by 390beretta View Post
I'll second this statement!
me third!
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Old 11-06-2012, 12:49 PM   #25
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Originally Posted by Dracus124 View Post
If the driver is trained properly he can see a motorcycle.

It is way too easy to get a driver's license. and I know a couple people who can't pass the test for the life of them.


me third!
I disagree-- it is way too easy to KEEP a driver's license.

Sure, perhaps it should be harder to get a license here in the United States.

But even if it was harder, so what? Once you get your license, you have it, effectively for life, and no one is going to take it away from you unless you're criminally negligent. No one is ever going to give you another written test. No one is going to force you to retake a driving test, or heaven forbid, an actual driving *class*.

A harder initial test would be nice, but I'd be okay with the current "easy" test if people simply had to retake it every 10 years (at a minimum-- if money were no object, I would be even happier with every *5* years. Of course, the same goes true for riders as well).
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Old 11-06-2012, 01:30 PM   #26
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Originally Posted by daveinva View Post
I disagree-- it is way too easy to KEEP a driver's license.

Sure, perhaps it should be harder to get a license here in the United States.

But even if it was harder, so what? Once you get your license, you have it, effectively for life, and no one is going to take it away from you unless you're criminally negligent. No one is ever going to give you another written test. No one is going to force you to retake a driving test, or heaven forbid, an actual driving *class*.

A harder initial test would be nice, but I'd be okay with the current "easy" test if people simply had to retake it every 10 years (at a minimum-- if money were no object, I would be even happier with every *5* years. Of course, the same goes true for riders as well).
+1 On the, every five years test. I bet lot of people would be in for a nasty surprise, providing that the test wasnt a walk thru. I have a feeling it'll never eventuate though.
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Old 11-06-2012, 01:41 PM   #27
troidus
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With ever-more-stringent rollover standards, roof pillars are becoming very thick and difficult to see around. I have to do a serious head weave to make sure something isn't hiding behind the A pillars before pulling away from a stop or making a turn.
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Old 11-06-2012, 08:56 PM   #28
DOD
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Motogymkhanaman View Post


Check this out for an in-depth study.

http://www.network.mag-uk.org/smidsy...oo%20Close.pdf
Good article. Thanks for posting.


-dod
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Old 11-07-2012, 03:25 AM   #29
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Originally Posted by troidus View Post
With ever-more-stringent rollover standacyclerds, roof pillars are becoming very thick and difficult to see around. I have to do a serious head weave to make sure something isn't hiding behind the A pillars before pulling away from a stop or making a turn.
In some situations, the pillar hides a car, let alone a motorcycle
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Old 11-07-2012, 05:09 AM   #30
foxtrapper
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All this missed what I think is a most fundamental point, they don't see us because they aren't looking for us. People are trained to look for *cars*, they see *cars*, they do not see motorcycles or other non-car things as a result. People watch out of other cars, not other vehicles. This is why they are also notorious for pulling out in front of semis and such, they really didn't see that huge thing because it wasn't what they were looking for.

There's also one other that hasn't been mentioned, and that's the blind spot we all have in each eyeball. This is the one we play with in school, watching the dot disapear as we move a piece of paper in and out from our face. If you just glance to the side, and use only one eyeball, things can hide in that blind spot. That's why you really need to turn your head and get both eyeballs looking, not just one.
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