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Old 11-12-2012, 07:28 PM   #16
vintagerider
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Quote:
Originally Posted by VEGASGSA View Post


No..just use the recommended grades...ie. GL5..simple enough..

Def uses a GL5 from Wally World..adds some Moly..several of us use Amsoil Severe Gear..all with no problems and MANY MANY miles...
Wish it were that simple. It is no wonder that confusion abounds. 1150, 1100 and 1200 all have different considerations for transmission..

First off the API designation for GL5 gear oil is very broad. On the 1100, which was op's concern, there is the problem of the gear rubbing on the rear bearing of the input shaft (M97 5 speed). Oil isn't going to correct that but selection of oil that isn't going to coagulate inside the bearing may give quite a few more miles.

Look at what the Getrag, the manufacturer of the gear box had to say regarding in a 1996 interview with German magazine MO (translation courtesy of Kari Prager)

1. expressed concern about compatibility of friction modifiers/additives

MO: How do you regard oil additives?

SCHAETZLE: Oil additives are always factors which cannot be taken into account when designing and building a transmission. In the best case they don't do any harm... it has not been researched yet how oil additives might react with the new "clean bearings". We therefore rigorously recommend against their use... Special extra-slippery additives can result in big damages.

my comment: Syns were not in wide use at the time. Many pictures have been posted since showing failed clean bearings with coagulated grease inside

2. MO: What kind of oil recommendation for the BMW transmission can you give us?

SCHAETZLE: Oil should be seen as an integral part of the transmission. When designing the transmission the load bearing capability of the oil is part of the calculation. We fill the BMW transmissions with SAE 90 GL 5 gear oil manufactured by Fuchs, a brand mainly found as an OEM supplier.

SOMMER: SAE 90-Oil should be used throughout the whole year. It is true that in winter the shifting will suffer at first from the thick oil, but it should improve during a very short ride. For those to whom this is disturbing, because they make many short trips, for example, can use 75w90 GL 5 in winter as an alternative. In summer it must be changed back to SAE 90 GL 5.

comment: note that 75w90 is NOT recommended, just straight SAE 90. To add confusion for the consumer who has always been told that a multi-weight is fine because"it works the same", well that's just not true and Getrag is telling you so.
-----
Here is an interesting article that delves in to viscosity among other things. It high-lights the corrosive problems of GL5 use in synco boxes and that is purportedly not a concern with the oilhead box, however one begins to understand that a GL5 can be LS or not LS and that the API GL5 spec is simply too broad. The ideal oil for a gear box is not the same as that for an LS differential yet most lubes sold as GL5's seem to be for LS.
http://www.widman.biz/uploads/Transaxle_oil.pdf
-------
API-SAE-and other specifications:
API MT-1 : a specification stringent on seal protection and thermal durability not included in GL5 classifucation.

GL5 plus... ???

SAE J2360: exceeds all: GL5 + MT-1 + U.S. military spec MIL-PRF-2105E . Also must pass proof of performance through rigorous field testing ( "clean bearing"compatibility not mentioned)
http://www.lubrizol.com/DrivelineAdd...arOil/GL5.html

Conclusions:
Clearly Getrag has had concerns regarding "clean bearings" and their compatibility with certain gear oils since their introduction in 1996. Telling us not to use "additives" but only specifying GL5 isn't much help but does raise the flag on syns. GL5 that does not also meet MT-1 will not have superior seal protection.

There are plenty of photos showing coagulation issues on these bearings. Not many other boxes are built with yak grease packed bearings which are submerged in GL5.

Anecdotal popularity in the 1150 box does not translate to best choice in the 1100 box.

Syns are not created equal. None of the classifications or industry wide specifications deal with clean bearing compatibility. It's pretty clear that the labeled viscosity of a syn needs to be much higher than that for a conventional non-syn. 75w140 at a minimum. It is difficult to know what group base stock you are buying. Store brand syns like Mo 1, Catrol, Valvoline are almost always made from cheaper base stocks and are likely to coagulate when they get in the bearing. Better syn refiners list the base stock and additive packages used.

The ideal 1100 gear box oil (not FD):
- superior seal protection like MT-1
- clean bearing compatibility
- adequate shaft/gear protection
- ride-ability: ease of shifting, all temperature performance
- all season (multi-viscosity) (may contradict oem spec)
- superior thermal protection (our boxes get much hotter than cars)
- superior anti-corrosion
- low drag/fuel economy
Does any one oil exceed in all areas? Probably not.

Extended drain interval is much less important. Frequent changes in this gear box are the single best preventive maintenance that we can do. This flushes out metal bits and also dust from the trail. Why pay extra for extended drain formulation?

In many ways the MT-1 classification with it's outstanding seal protection, optimization for non-syncro gear boxes in heavy trucks and buses looks good. Fortunately many GL5 also meet MT-1.

Riders may have trouble finding a conventional GL5, MT-1, SAE J2360 in SAE 90 weight. Easier to find is 80w90 (remember Getrag says no to 75w90 except for winter or short hops) but this is lighter than recommended. BMW retail stores are selling 80w90 conventional as of this writing. Since the dealer oil must cover many years and models this is likely a compromise 85w145 conv is too heavy. If labeled as "limited slip differential" then the oil may not the best choice for the gear box.

For final drive use more riders have been leaning toward conventional. I as well as other have noticed brinelling of the bearing after very few miles
on syn in the FD.This shows up as silvery golden flakes.
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Old 11-12-2012, 09:37 PM   #17
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Quote:
Originally Posted by vintagerider View Post
Wish it were that simple. It is no wonder that confusion abounds. 1150, 1100 and 1200 all have different considerations for transmission..

First off the API designation for GL5 gear oil is very broad. On the 1100, which was op's concern, there is the problem of the gear rubbing on the rear bearing of the input shaft (M97 5 speed). Oil isn't going to correct that but selection of oil that isn't going to coagulate inside the bearing may give quite a few more miles.

Look at what the Getrag, the manufacturer of the gear box had to say regarding in a 1996 interview with German magazine MO (translation courtesy of Kari Prager)

1. expressed concern about compatibility of friction modifiers/additives

MO: How do you regard oil additives?

SCHAETZLE: Oil additives are always factors which cannot be taken into account when designing and building a transmission. In the best case they don't do any harm... it has not been researched yet how oil additives might react with the new "clean bearings". We therefore rigorously recommend against their use... Special extra-slippery additives can result in big damages.

my comment: Syns were not in wide use at the time. Many pictures have been posted since showing failed clean bearings with coagulated grease inside

2. MO: What kind of oil recommendation for the BMW transmission can you give us?

SCHAETZLE: Oil should be seen as an integral part of the transmission. When designing the transmission the load bearing capability of the oil is part of the calculation. We fill the BMW transmissions with SAE 90 GL 5 gear oil manufactured by Fuchs, a brand mainly found as an OEM supplier.

SOMMER: SAE 90-Oil should be used throughout the whole year. It is true that in winter the shifting will suffer at first from the thick oil, but it should improve during a very short ride. For those to whom this is disturbing, because they make many short trips, for example, can use 75w90 GL 5 in winter as an alternative. In summer it must be changed back to SAE 90 GL 5.

comment: note that 75w90 is NOT recommended, just straight SAE 90. To add confusion for the consumer who has always been told that a multi-weight is fine because"it works the same", well that's just not true and Getrag is telling you so.
-----
Here is an interesting article that delves in to viscosity among other things. It high-lights the corrosive problems of GL5 use in synco boxes and that is purportedly not a concern with the oilhead box, however one begins to understand that a GL5 can be LS or not LS and that the API GL5 spec is simply too broad. The ideal oil for a gear box is not the same as that for an LS differential yet most lubes sold as GL5's seem to be for LS.
http://www.widman.biz/uploads/Transaxle_oil.pdf
-------
API-SAE-and other specifications:
API MT-1 : a specification stringent on seal protection and thermal durability not included in GL5 classifucation.

GL5 plus... ???

SAE J2360: exceeds all: GL5 + MT-1 + U.S. military spec MIL-PRF-2105E . Also must pass proof of performance through rigorous field testing ( "clean bearing"compatibility not mentioned)
http://www.lubrizol.com/DrivelineAdd...arOil/GL5.html

Conclusions:
Clearly Getrag has had concerns regarding "clean bearings" and their compatibility with certain gear oils since their introduction in 1996. Telling us not to use "additives" but only specifying GL5 isn't much help but does raise the flag on syns. GL5 that does not also meet MT-1 will not have superior seal protection.

There are plenty of photos showing coagulation issues on these bearings. Not many other boxes are built with yak grease packed bearings which are submerged in GL5.

Anecdotal popularity in the 1150 box does not translate to best choice in the 1100 box.

Syns are not created equal. None of the classifications or industry wide specifications deal with clean bearing compatibility. It's pretty clear that the labeled viscosity of a syn needs to be much higher than that for a conventional non-syn. 75w140 at a minimum. It is difficult to know what group base stock you are buying. Store brand syns like Mo 1, Catrol, Valvoline are almost always made from cheaper base stocks and are likely to coagulate when they get in the bearing. Better syn refiners list the base stock and additive packages used.

The ideal 1100 gear box oil (not FD):
- superior seal protection like MT-1
- clean bearing compatibility
- adequate shaft/gear protection
- ride-ability: ease of shifting, all temperature performance
- all season (multi-viscosity) (may contradict oem spec)
- superior thermal protection (our boxes get much hotter than cars)
- superior anti-corrosion
- low drag/fuel economy
Does any one oil exceed in all areas? Probably not.

Extended drain interval is much less important. Frequent changes in this gear box are the single best preventive maintenance that we can do. This flushes out metal bits and also dust from the trail. Why pay extra for extended drain formulation?

In many ways the MT-1 classification with it's outstanding seal protection, optimization for non-syncro gear boxes in heavy trucks and buses looks good. Fortunately many GL5 also meet MT-1.

Riders may have trouble finding a conventional GL5, MT-1, SAE J2360 in SAE 90 weight. Easier to find is 80w90 (remember Getrag says no to 75w90 except for winter or short hops) but this is lighter than recommended. BMW retail stores are selling 80w90 conventional as of this writing. Since the dealer oil must cover many years and models this is likely a compromise 85w145 conv is too heavy. If labeled as "limited slip differential" then the oil may not the best choice for the gear box.

For final drive use more riders have been leaning toward conventional. I as well as other have noticed brinelling of the bearing after very few miles
on syn in the FD.This shows up as silvery golden flakes.
In my manual..for an '08 GSA (and my old '05 GS) it stated Castrol SAF-XO and Castrol SAF-XJ..these are 75W-90 and 75W-140 weights..?? GL5..

http://www.castrol.com/castrol/gener...tentId=7068181

So..if that's what BMW recommends..for my bike..I'm happy running it..I'm also happy deviating from that using my own discretion..
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Old 11-12-2012, 10:13 PM   #18
vintagerider
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Quote:
Originally Posted by VEGASGSA View Post
In my manual..for an '08 GSA (and my old '05 GS) it stated Castrol SAF-XO and Castrol SAF-XJ..these are 75W-90 and 75W-140 weights..?? GL5..

http://www.castrol.com/castrol/gener...tentId=7068181

So..if that's what BMW recommends..for my bike..I'm happy running it..I'm also happy deviating from that using my own discretion..
How is that relevant to an 1100 thread? Or what Getrag said?
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Old 11-12-2012, 11:06 PM   #19
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Quote:
Originally Posted by vintagerider View Post
How is that relevant to an 1100 thread? Or what Getrag said?


Just as an observer - could what Getrag said at that time simply be dated now?

I'm sure there has been a lot of advancement since then in the current oil products. One reason I wanted to try Red Line was the Ester base stock they use and supposedly it's affinity to metal.

I quickly scanned the article and what's hard for us 'oil newbies' is the contradictory -assumptions- like:
  • If viscosity is important then this statement concerning selecting the correct viscosity in the article: "If it is too thin it will not provide the hydrodynamic lubrication that is required between gears and in the bearings or bushings.".
  • Making the assumption that today companies are making oil products with different additives that provide those protection levels beyond the normal viscosity properties that were present 10 years ago or so... Shockproof ("Acting like a liquid grease, these unique lubricants contain a suspension of solid microscopic particles as an extreme pressure agent, offering a "best of both worlds" balance of low drag and superior protection for gear teeth"), and maybe moly etc.

-Edit- I guess a better way to word this would be that today I understand that additives such as moly, or other proprietary additives provide that 'hydrodynamic lubrication' or what I want to call a -barrier- that is more viscosity tolerant than in years past. Or am I wrong in that assumption? Is there a 'test' or rating that would provide a value for this 'hydrodynamic lubrication' property that we should pay attention to?

Red Line 75W90 GL-5 Gear Oil has these ratings: API GL-5, GL-6, MT-1, MIL-L-2105E, SAE J2360, and Chrysler spec MS-9763

Now concerning an email I wrote regarding their initial recommendations for Shockproof I got this in response (this is getting out of the op's interests, this is in reference to the 1200 - but still interesting - as all oil threads ):
Quote:
The ShockProof gear oils are extremely unique products and don’t carry a GL rating though would easily provide GL-5 protection levels.

If you are still under warranty the 75W90 would be a better choice, carrying the GL-5 on the packaging as well as being a typical gear oil appearance. The ShockProof gear oils are extremely unique products both in appearance and performance, well suited to many specialized applications, performing extremely well in BMW transmissions and final drives.

We use the manufacturers fluid call out as a basis for our recommendations.

WindSailor screwed with this post 11-13-2012 at 01:43 AM
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Old 11-13-2012, 04:34 AM   #20
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Quote:
Originally Posted by vintagerider View Post
Wish it were that simple. It is no wonder that confusion abounds. 1150, 1100 and 1200 all have different considerations for transmission..

First off the API designation for GL5 gear oil is very broad. On the 1100, which was op's concern, there is the problem of the gear rubbing on the rear bearing of the input shaft (M97 5 speed). Oil isn't going to correct that but selection of oil that isn't going to coagulate inside the bearing may give quite a few more miles.

Look at what the Getrag, the manufacturer of the gear box had to say regarding in a 1996 interview with German magazine MO (translation courtesy of Kari Prager)

1. expressed concern about compatibility of friction modifiers/additives

MO: How do you regard oil additives?

SCHAETZLE: Oil additives are always factors which cannot be taken into account when designing and building a transmission. In the best case they don't do any harm... it has not been researched yet how oil additives might react with the new "clean bearings". We therefore rigorously recommend against their use... Special extra-slippery additives can result in big damages.

my comment: Syns were not in wide use at the time. Many pictures have been posted since showing failed clean bearings with coagulated grease inside

2. MO: What kind of oil recommendation for the BMW transmission can you give us?

SCHAETZLE: Oil should be seen as an integral part of the transmission. When designing the transmission the load bearing capability of the oil is part of the calculation. We fill the BMW transmissions with SAE 90 GL 5 gear oil manufactured by Fuchs, a brand mainly found as an OEM supplier.

SOMMER: SAE 90-Oil should be used throughout the whole year. It is true that in winter the shifting will suffer at first from the thick oil, but it should improve during a very short ride. For those to whom this is disturbing, because they make many short trips, for example, can use 75w90 GL 5 in winter as an alternative. In summer it must be changed back to SAE 90 GL 5.

comment: note that 75w90 is NOT recommended, just straight SAE 90. To add confusion for the consumer who has always been told that a multi-weight is fine because"it works the same", well that's just not true and Getrag is telling you so.
-----
Here is an interesting article that delves in to viscosity among other things. It high-lights the corrosive problems of GL5 use in synco boxes and that is purportedly not a concern with the oilhead box, however one begins to understand that a GL5 can be LS or not LS and that the API GL5 spec is simply too broad. The ideal oil for a gear box is not the same as that for an LS differential yet most lubes sold as GL5's seem to be for LS.
http://www.widman.biz/uploads/Transaxle_oil.pdf
-------
API-SAE-and other specifications:
API MT-1 : a specification stringent on seal protection and thermal durability not included in GL5 classifucation.

GL5 plus... ???

SAE J2360: exceeds all: GL5 + MT-1 + U.S. military spec MIL-PRF-2105E . Also must pass proof of performance through rigorous field testing ( "clean bearing"compatibility not mentioned)
http://www.lubrizol.com/DrivelineAdd...arOil/GL5.html

Conclusions:
Clearly Getrag has had concerns regarding "clean bearings" and their compatibility with certain gear oils since their introduction in 1996. Telling us not to use "additives" but only specifying GL5 isn't much help but does raise the flag on syns. GL5 that does not also meet MT-1 will not have superior seal protection.

There are plenty of photos showing coagulation issues on these bearings. Not many other boxes are built with yak grease packed bearings which are submerged in GL5.

Anecdotal popularity in the 1150 box does not translate to best choice in the 1100 box.

Syns are not created equal. None of the classifications or industry wide specifications deal with clean bearing compatibility. It's pretty clear that the labeled viscosity of a syn needs to be much higher than that for a conventional non-syn. 75w140 at a minimum. It is difficult to know what group base stock you are buying. Store brand syns like Mo 1, Catrol, Valvoline are almost always made from cheaper base stocks and are likely to coagulate when they get in the bearing. Better syn refiners list the base stock and additive packages used.

The ideal 1100 gear box oil (not FD):
- superior seal protection like MT-1
- clean bearing compatibility
- adequate shaft/gear protection
- ride-ability: ease of shifting, all temperature performance
- all season (multi-viscosity) (may contradict oem spec)
- superior thermal protection (our boxes get much hotter than cars)
- superior anti-corrosion
- low drag/fuel economy
Does any one oil exceed in all areas? Probably not.

Extended drain interval is much less important. Frequent changes in this gear box are the single best preventive maintenance that we can do. This flushes out metal bits and also dust from the trail. Why pay extra for extended drain formulation?

In many ways the MT-1 classification with it's outstanding seal protection, optimization for non-syncro gear boxes in heavy trucks and buses looks good. Fortunately many GL5 also meet MT-1.

Riders may have trouble finding a conventional GL5, MT-1, SAE J2360 in SAE 90 weight. Easier to find is 80w90 (remember Getrag says no to 75w90 except for winter or short hops) but this is lighter than recommended. BMW retail stores are selling 80w90 conventional as of this writing. Since the dealer oil must cover many years and models this is likely a compromise 85w145 conv is too heavy. If labeled as "limited slip differential" then the oil may not the best choice for the gear box.

For final drive use more riders have been leaning toward conventional. I as well as other have noticed brinelling of the bearing after very few miles
on syn in the FD.This shows up as silvery golden flakes.
I think I'll stick with my statement that it might be simpler to just buy the BMW brand oil that's recommended for a specific bike from a BMW dealer and pay the price and document it. Then if (when) it blows up, maybe they'll be more likely to help out with the repair costs.
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Old 11-13-2012, 04:51 AM   #21
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Windsailor, excellent points. Getrag knew darn well that gear lube was going to mingle with the yak grease in their "clean" bearings. They designed the gearbox to work in unison with a specific fluid. Not too slippery, with a certain body. At a BMOA lecture it was that BMW felt riders would not change the fluid often enough to clear the high quantity of particles shed by their gear boxes so they gave us "clean bearings". Originally the covers were billed as " new design with micro-filtration" Figure that one out.

If you look at bearing failures on the 1150, miscibility with certain syns is still somewhat of a concern. Unproven fluid may help the gears only if the bearings survive.

Redline is quality stuff and decently priced. Not top of line but very good. But is it right for the M94, M97 or 11xx six speed? I tried their Shockproof HD- couldn't get shed of it quick enough. Shifting was horrible.

Amsoil was o.k., CRC Syn-Go OEM was silky smooth but its hard to justify at $45/qt and long term bearing compatibility is still unknown. Most 11xx riders want best value not over-shooting point of diminishing return.

Getting back to what you said about the old Getrag interview, conventional multi-grades, just how much have they changed? If 75w90 conventional was not recommended for M97 at the time then how comfortable can one be with it today, or even with 80w90?

Yes, it does seem that there ought to be a modern fluid that serves the "ideal" above but which one is that? How much is reasonable to pay for himmlischen Flüssigkeit?

The new fluids are an essential component of modern lighter drive lines. But the benefits do not automatically extend to older equipment. For classic vehicle owners obsolete fluids have long been a problem . Most of us prefer Riding over training for lubrication engineer. But hopefully this discussion will rescue few M97's from an untimely death (including op's).

A word on gear oil lab analysis: Visual is better. I've sent out samples with visible metal flake yet they came back "clean". If we could get reliable analysis then we could test the effectiveness of the the syns. Another way to shorten the list is to look at the base stocks and additive package for Mo 1 75w90, a known endgültige Lösung für Motorrad-Getriebe Frage.
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Old 11-13-2012, 04:57 AM   #22
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Beemerlover View Post
I think I'll stick with my statement that it might be simpler to just buy the BMW brand oil that's recommended for a specific bike from a BMW dealer and pay the price and document it. Then if (when) it blows up, maybe they'll be more likely to help out with the repair costs.
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Old 11-13-2012, 08:14 AM   #23
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OK so getting educated on my 1100GS transmission and which oil to use is like getting a drink of water from a fire hydrant. But I am startting to get an idea. So Vintagerider are you using straight conventional oil 90w? Or an 80w90? Or a 75-90 syth oil out there that meets the specs (I like the way they run cooler)? Where I live it's like summer riding most of the year. Also not sound wanting to sound like an idiot but what does "moly" do and if it gives the "shockproof" qualities that safe to add? The Heavy Shockproof relieved the "clunk"" of my Harley shifting and originally that is what I was thinking when wanting to use it in my GS.


I love my "new" 1100GS with all it quirks and noises, so I do appreciate all of what you guys are telling me here. I've always tryed to live by the KISS (keep it simple stupid) method with all my bike maintance: regular service intervals (usually about half of what the manufacturer recommends), good quality fluids, I do my own wrenching, and ride a lot. I'm not a fan of Dealer oils. So... (not trying to blow up this thread) I suppose I'm open to recommendations?
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Old 11-13-2012, 09:03 AM   #24
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Sure..Always Up For An Oil Thread!

While I have read dire consequences of using RL [well actually the same one over and over]...I have a few questions and what my limited experience has been riding dirt only on my '07 GSA. "Ancient Rider" , I can say that at my age, seems to have more 'from the horse's mouth', although most of time I think BMW speaks from the other end, info which is greatly appreciated rather than our WAGs.

#1 Do the transmissions vary greatly from model to model [e.g.: 1100,1150, 1200]? Primarily in the context of lube requirements.

#2 Is there any actual documentation of lube ever damaging a trans or FD for that matter? Looking for a direct cause and effect link. If yes, what was the response of the lube manufacturer when confronted with this evidence?

My limited experience...I use 220 ml, original BMW recommendation for my bike, of RL Heavy SP in FD and the same lube in trans. Oh, RL 20-50MC in motor. No problems to date. All is smooth, in spite of a lot of slow speed high motor heat....I do not ride pavement so no prolonged 70MPH++ runs, well I might touch 70 on dirt but only until my common sense returns. Honestly my experience means zero...since nobody knows what exactly is occurring on the friction surfaces of my bike...never will. My riding style goal it to be smooth and no slamming anything.

Oil threads are always subjective. In my perfect world I would love to see objective data. Is there any specifically for the FDs and trans on BMWs? Oh well, world is not perfect!

Thanks.
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Old 11-13-2012, 12:54 PM   #25
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Bearsfatha, Your 1100 gear box thread deserves to be in the 1100 forum. Confused? wait 'till the wasser boxer is out.

The full 1996 Getrag/MO interview (translation by Kari Prager) is on Anton's site as well as on Micapeak.
http://micapeak.com/bmw-gs/trans.html

Are you Inupiaq and planing on using your 1100GS in the whale hunt? If not then 75w90 syn ought to be entirely off the table. If you are still considering any syn for some odd reason then only consider those with 145 in the number. You know the risks, but just as heath officials have learned photos are the best persuaders. Might want to search for some of the co-agged 1100 bearings.

If your manual said "75w90", which it doesn't, then synthetic equivalent would be 75w145. If you have money to burn then try CRC SL2495 Syn-Go OEM. Make several flushes with $3/qt bulk 90 wt from the truck stop first. Who knows, you might just find that perfectly adequate.

Running with the big boys:
Zef runs flax oil fortified with hen's teeth fillings in his 1150. Works for him. My auntie is still working off her supply of canned ATF (bet you didn't know that fluids used to come in cans for 19 cents/quart). Has all she'll ever knead for her leaking Rambler American. Mary, who is quite contrary, once read something about needing paraffin in her engine oil. Wish that we could get her to stop cramming those tiny colorful candles in her cylinders every winter solstice.

Buy fluid from your BMW store to get your 1100 warranty re-instated.

Expect your 1100 questions to be answered by all sorts of folks around here. Check the responder's profile to see what they are riding. 1150's are very similar but not the same as 1100's. Good thing to keep in mind always.
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Old 11-13-2012, 09:22 PM   #26
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Originally Posted by vintagerider View Post
How is that relevant to an 1100 thread? Or what Getrag said?
My bad..thought the OP was on a 1200..

sincere apologies and beers and bacon sammiches all around..
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Old 11-13-2012, 09:45 PM   #27
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Why Your Bad?

Quote:
Originally Posted by VEGASGSA View Post
My bad..thought the OP was on a 1200..

sincere apologies and beers and bacon sammiches all around..
So what if it is a 1100, 1150 or 1200? Not being a wise ass, but does it make any documented difference in the lube selection?

Possibly my previous questions were answered elsewhere....but all this "maybe yes or maybe no" doesn't lead to a definitive choice in selecting not only the 'best' [if that exists] but a choice that some say could ruin your machine [if that exists]. Can anyone shed light on my questions below. I am not trying to sharp shoot anyone, just want solid documented information/answers to help with lube selection. I am beginning to think there isn't any.

#1 Do the transmissions vary greatly from model to model [e.g.: 1100,1150, 1200]? Primarily in the context of lube requirements.


#2 Is there any actual documentation of lube ever damaging a trans or FD for that matter? Looking for a direct cause and effect link. If yes, what was the response of the lube manufacturer when confronted with this evidence?

Thanks folks.
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Old 11-13-2012, 10:44 PM   #28
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Wallowa View Post
So what if it is a 1100, 1150 or 1200? Not being a wise ass, but does it make any documented difference in the lube selection?

Possibly my previous questions were answered elsewhere....but all this "maybe yes or maybe no" doesn't lead to a definitive choice in selecting not only the 'best' [if that exists] but a choice that some say could ruin your machine [if that exists]. Can anyone shed light on my questions below. I am not trying to sharp shoot anyone, just want solid documented information/answers to help with lube selection. I am beginning to think there isn't any.

#1 Do the transmissions vary greatly from model to model [e.g.: 1100,1150, 1200]? Primarily in the context of lube requirements.


#2 Is there any actual documentation of lube ever damaging a trans or FD for that matter? Looking for a direct cause and effect link. If yes, what was the response of the lube manufacturer when confronted with this evidence?

Thanks folks.
I think there have been several updates and iterations between the 1100 to 1200..I've read elsewhere of some known problems with the older trannys that I don't BELIEVE to exist in the 1200..however I may be completely wrong..

That said..I would not presume to tell someone what weights were spec'd in the older bikes..as I have no personalexperience with them..I know Def runs 75W-90 with added Moly in his 2001.

As to lube caused damage..I'd hardly think so..there has been a hiccup i that a sealed bearing, loses the seal adn the grease inside mixes with and is washed out by the gear oil..if this causes bearing failure, I am not aware..a sealed bearing inside a tranny is sorta stoopid..not sure how it could be ruined though..just lubed differently.
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Old 11-14-2012, 12:31 AM   #29
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http://www.advrider.com/forums/showthread.php?t=749812
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Old 11-14-2012, 09:27 AM   #30
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Thanks!

Quote:
Originally Posted by VEGASGSA View Post
I think there have been several updates and iterations between the 1100 to 1200..I've read elsewhere of some known problems with the older trannys that I don't BELIEVE to exist in the 1200..however I may be completely wrong..

That said..I would not presume to tell someone what weights were spec'd in the older bikes..as I have no personalexperience with them..I know Def runs 75W-90 with added Moly in his 2001.

As to lube caused damage..I'd hardly think so..there has been a hiccup i that a sealed bearing, loses the seal adn the grease inside mixes with and is washed out by the gear oil..if this causes bearing failure, I am not aware..a sealed bearing inside a tranny is sorta stoopid..not sure how it could be ruined though..just lubed differently.
Thanks do appreciate the insights. Lots of gaps in mine!
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