ADVrider

Go Back   ADVrider > Gear > Equipment
User Name
Password
Register Inmates Photos Site Rules Search Today's Posts Mark Forums Read

Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread Display Modes
Old 11-10-2012, 06:23 PM   #16
radmeister
not there
 
radmeister's Avatar
 
Joined: Mar 2010
Location: Here
Oddometer: 43
I agree with digitdion.

Merino wool is far superior to any synthetic i have tried.
__________________
durate, et vosmet rebus servate secundis
radmeister is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-10-2012, 07:55 PM   #17
mookybird
Gramps
 
mookybird's Avatar
 
Joined: Nov 2011
Location: Olympic Peninsula, Washington State
Oddometer: 213
Lots of choices, like several others here I own several brands and types synthetic and merino. One feature that I find works really well for motorbiking and the pulling armor and gloves on and off all day is thumb loops on the sleeves.
mookybird is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-11-2012, 03:57 AM   #18
Grinnin
Forever N00b
 
Joined: Dec 2005
Location: Maine
Oddometer: 2,439
Best for me under heated gear is Terramar merino. Very comfortable. For longer trips it will dry overnight. The kind of knit has lots of air pockets and lots of stretch. Overall I find a thin merino is most versatile.

Best for me without heated gear is Duofold grey, a very thick wool/poly blend.

I also have Duofold blue (another wool/poly) that's somewhere between those two.

The Aerostich merino base layer is fairly thick and comfortable. The neck opening is pretty large so they are less versatile. The 'stich merino bottoms are good.

I have two kinds of Patagonia poly stuff and it's OK, but not nearly as comfortable as merino.

EDIT: I wrote "Duofold blue" above but there are two kinds: one is wool/poly, the other is wool/cotton and is fine for light work around the house.
__________________
Motorcycles are magical.


Grinnin screwed with this post 11-16-2012 at 04:33 AM
Grinnin is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-11-2012, 04:56 AM   #19
JTT
Beastly Adventurer
 
JTT's Avatar
 
Joined: Jul 2005
Location: Halifax, NS
Oddometer: 1,518
Quote:
Originally Posted by Turkus View Post
In the heat all you need is to keep them damp as Mario (the owner of LDC instructs) and regulate the airflow in your jacket to keep you cool as a cucumber.

My $0.02
I am not trying to be a smart ass, but trying to understand....if a fabric dries exceptionally fast, how do you keep it damp? As I understood it, one of the features of LD gear is it's ability to hold water and keep you cool (like a cooling vest)...trouble is I don't see how it can hold water, yet dry fast?

I'm very close to pulling the trigger on some LD gear. I have a variety of different stuff now, some works exceptional, some not so much. I really like the Merino stuff so far, but open to things like LD, particularly as it comes from motorcyclists.

I'm alway a little leery of the "overnight dry" statements, as in my experience, this depends heavily on your environment. I've had garments that dry in a matter of hours on a dry, warm night, yet the same garment is still damp 24hrs later on a cold and damp day (so common in my world). Often, like with most motorcycle gear, claims are made based on Southern California climates.
JTT is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-11-2012, 05:13 AM   #20
JohnBoy777 OP
Pseudo-Adventurist
 
JohnBoy777's Avatar
 
Joined: Sep 2007
Location: NE Ohio
Oddometer: 888
Quote:
Originally Posted by JTT View Post
I am not trying to be a smart ass, but trying to understand....if a fabric dries exceptionally fast, how do you keep it damp? As I understood it, one of the features of LD gear is it's ability to hold water and keep you cool (like a cooling vest)...trouble is I don't see how it can hold water, yet dry fast?
.
In the heat, if it dries fast, that means that the evaporative effect of the material is working in your favor. As the moisture evaporates, it cools the body - kinda like the old swamp coolers. You don't want it to hold water - but rather, evapoate the water present as quickly as possible. Otherwise, you have hot, damp water (think cotton) next to your skin. At least that's my understanding.

Did I just say 'damp water'?


.
JohnBoy777 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-11-2012, 05:15 AM   #21
Grinnin
Forever N00b
 
Joined: Dec 2005
Location: Maine
Oddometer: 2,439
Quote:
Originally Posted by JTT View Post
I'm alway a little leery of the "overnight dry" statements, as in my experience, this depends heavily on your environment. I've had garments that dry in a matter of hours on a dry, warm night, yet the same garment is still damp 24hrs later on a cold and damp day (so common in my world). Often, like with most motorcycle gear, claims are made based on Southern California climates.
I have also purchased "quick dry" items that really don't dry that well.

Drying has at least 2 components: dripping and evaporation. Thinner fabrics that don't hold water well will drip more of the water out so that high humidity is less of a problem. I live about 150 miles from you and along the coast.

My Terramar merino long underwear will dry faster than my Ex-officio "travel" boxer-briefs. The best example that I own is a Columbia insulated jacket that will drip to near-dry in just 2 or 3 minutes. The last part of drying does, indeed, depend on the humidity.
__________________
Motorcycles are magical.

Grinnin is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-11-2012, 04:20 PM   #22
JTT
Beastly Adventurer
 
JTT's Avatar
 
Joined: Jul 2005
Location: Halifax, NS
Oddometer: 1,518
Quote:
Originally Posted by JohnBoy777 View Post
In the heat, if it dries fast, that means that the evaporative effect of the material is working in your favor. As the moisture evaporates, it cools the body - kinda like the old swamp coolers. You don't want it to hold water - but rather, evapoate the water present as quickly as possible. Otherwise, you have hot, damp water (think cotton) next to your skin. At least that's my understanding.

Did I just say 'damp water'?


.
Yeah, I hate that damp water

I recognize the evaporative effect. In fact I have a cooling vest that works exactly on the principle, only it works to hold water and stay wet extending the time frame for the evaporate effect. Evaporative good, but drying fast means it will only last a very short time...doesn't it?

Grinnin, that is very interesting. I never really thought of it as "dripping" and "evaporating". It might explain why some things dry faster than others, although they "feel" similar. I'm just not sure I can tell which will drip dry faster, as at least in my experience, it doesn't seem to directly relate to the weight of the material.

I still say manufacturers should be testing their products in our environments Grinnin
JTT is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-11-2012, 06:01 PM   #23
Grinnin
Forever N00b
 
Joined: Dec 2005
Location: Maine
Oddometer: 2,439
Quote:
Originally Posted by JTT View Post
I'm just not sure I can tell which will drip dry faster, as at least in my experience, it doesn't seem to directly relate to the weight of the material.

I still say manufacturers should be testing their products in our environments Grinnin
I have a washer but no dryer so I hang clothes often and get to know which can come in early and which need to be moved to the indoor line at dusk. I also hang my "camping" clothes together sometimes for a head-to-head race.

But it WOULD be nice to have a standardized test for quick-dry clothing so I could know before buying.
__________________
Motorcycles are magical.

Grinnin is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-11-2012, 08:28 PM   #24
scorpion
Two arm bandit
 
scorpion's Avatar
 
Joined: Aug 2004
Location: Planet Reno
Oddometer: 5,343
Taking back a pair of Under Armor pants because the fit was weird on me.
Picked up a Patagonia capilene base layer shirt on sale, I put it on in the parking lot

Just order a pair of LD tights, I never heard about them before 15 minutes ago. So it better be good

Need to get my cold weather gear sorted
__________________

07 KTM 990 11 Husaberg 390
scorpion is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-11-2012, 08:50 PM   #25
Hikertrash
Beastly Adventurer
 
Joined: Aug 2011
Location: Arizona
Oddometer: 2,598
Quote:
Originally Posted by JTT View Post
I am not trying to be a smart ass, but trying to understand....if a fabric dries exceptionally fast, how do you keep it damp? As I understood it, one of the features of LD gear is it's ability to hold water and keep you cool (like a cooling vest)...trouble is I don't see how it can hold water, yet dry fast?

I'm very close to pulling the trigger on some LD gear. I have a variety of different stuff now, some works exceptional, some not so much. I really like the Merino stuff so far, but open to things like LD, particularly as it comes from motorcyclists.

I'm alway a little leery of the "overnight dry" statements, as in my experience, this depends heavily on your environment. I've had garments that dry in a matter of hours on a dry, warm night, yet the same garment is still damp 24hrs later on a cold and damp day (so common in my world). Often, like with most motorcycle gear, claims are made based on Southern California climates.
Well, you wear the LD under a standard M/C jacket and close all vents. I pour water down my sleeves and when riding, moving air goes up the wrist and cools my whole upper body like a swamp collar effect. The LD pants I don't wet, but under my Goretex pants, they keep me from being clammy and sweaty. I hand wash my LD top and bottom in the sink and it's dry in about 6 hours if wrung out by hand before hanging up. I've even soaked the top and wrung it out before wearing on hot days and it still feels dry against the skin.
Hikertrash is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-12-2012, 03:18 AM   #26
sierraoffroad
Beastly Adventurer
 
sierraoffroad's Avatar
 
Joined: Oct 2007
Location: Granville, ma
Oddometer: 1,291
i use EMS brand thermal bas layers with very good success. they have a tech baase layering system based on your needs for warmth. I'm an avid hunter and when its cold 20's I wear the tech 3 base layer which is a fairly heavy, but not too bulky to wear under a thin pair of pants like jeans.

another favorite is the first gear tpg base layer. very good warm material.
__________________
It's a Jungle out there.
2007 Blue Weestrom
2004 Yamaha Wr250f
sierraoffroad is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-12-2012, 06:17 AM   #27
Flounder
Adventurer
 
Joined: Nov 2012
Location: Prescott, AZ
Oddometer: 33
Quote:
Originally Posted by JohnBoy777 View Post

So what's the best?

Seemes like there are lots of options out there.
Your first decision is to go with synthetic or wool. Just as not all synthetics are the same, that is equally true for wool.

Synthetics have the advantage of usually being cheaper, slightly more durable, and can be made to wick moisture better than wool as it can be woven with a more sophisticated wicking construction. Wool, being a natural fiber, has natural wicking properties by nature, has great weight to warmth ratios, feels nice, and naturally fends of odor. Synthetics are only as good as the complexity of the weave and the anti-bacterial method used to supress the funk that often plagues many cheaper synthetics.

Under Armor is junk. Low sophistication in the weave and the anti-bacterial method varies from piece to piece, none of it worth a darn. Capaline from Patagonia is still one of the best wicking base layers. Others to consider: Craft, Arcteryx, and even Mountain Hardware.

Without getting overly complicated with Merino wool, the key there is the quality of the base wool, and the process used to soften the "scales" inherent in wool fibers. The worst Merino is probably better than the worst synthetics. That said, Icebreaker, Smartwool, and Ibex are the brands with the better wool base layers. As a general rule, natural fibers tend to not last as long as synthetic, especially in the lighter 120, 150 weights.

I'm the buyer for a big outdoor store. I'll order about $60k in base layers a year, so I've got a good idea what does and doesn't work.
Flounder is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-12-2012, 07:38 AM   #28
Turkus
Motorcyclus Unemploy
 
Turkus's Avatar
 
Joined: Dec 2009
Location: Recalculating.... :\
Oddometer: 22
Quote:
Originally Posted by JTT View Post
I am not trying to be a smart ass, but trying to understand....if a fabric dries exceptionally fast, how do you keep it damp? As I understood it, one of the features of LD gear is it's ability to hold water and keep you cool (like a cooling vest)...trouble is I don't see how it can hold water, yet dry fast?
Quote:
Originally Posted by Hikertrash View Post
Well, you wear the LD under a standard M/C jacket and close all vents. I pour water down my sleeves and when riding, moving air goes up the wrist and cools my whole upper body like a swamp collar effect. The LD pants I don't wet, but under my Goretex pants, they keep me from being clammy and sweaty. I hand wash my LD top and bottom in the sink and it's dry in about 6 hours if wrung out by hand before hanging up. I've even soaked the top and wrung it out before wearing on hot days and it still feels dry against the skin.
Hikertrash pretty much covered it....and DON'T wear mesh gear - it defeats the purpose of the LD Comfort material. Soak the garments - open up the jacket sleeves slightly at the gloves (wearing gauntlets won't help) and open up your collar "slightly" - the airflow up your arms and out your neck will keep you cool.
It worked VERY well for me (behind a fully faired BMW R1200RT) a couple of months ago when the temps were 90-something in Santa Paula, CA. A couple of years ago in July I hit Redding at 117 degrees at 5:00p.m. - 30 mins later I'm in the shadows of Shasta Lake and I got a chill at 95 degrees.

Anything above 100 degrees and I start to question my sanity and reasons to ride anyway....
__________________
Bruce
AMA#228900/BMWMOA#147760
Ride Safe....and with a purpose
www.streetmasters.info
Turkus is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-12-2012, 07:44 AM   #29
num1husker
Adventurer
 
Joined: Dec 2011
Location: Eltopia
Oddometer: 69
base layer

They offer several different base layers but I use the sub-zero ones.
https://www.goathleticapparel.com/sub-zero?TreeId=3
num1husker is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-12-2012, 11:33 AM   #30
montanaman
Traveler
 
montanaman's Avatar
 
Joined: Oct 2003
Location: CA,AZ,MT..USA
Oddometer: 171
The Sub Zero stuff has that feature

Quote:
Originally Posted by mookybird View Post
Lots of choices, like several others here I own several brands and types synthetic and merino. One feature that I find works really well for motorbiking and the pulling armor and gloves on and off all day is thumb loops on the sleeves.
Good stuff available on BMG site. I just got the Factor 2 shirt and pants. Good stuff. Have not battle tested it yet. That will happen this week on a Death Valley ride..
__________________
Quit dreaming, get on and start living.
montanaman is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Share

Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

.
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is On

Forum Jump


Times are GMT -7.   It's 12:14 AM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.5
Copyright ©2000 - 2014, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
Copyright ADVrider 2011-2014