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Old 11-21-2012, 05:57 PM   #91
drsean
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The V-Star 950 Tourer might be a good fit. Comes equipped with windshield & locking hard bags. I've done 500+ mile days on this comfortabley. Motors down the highway at 80mph just fine. This particular example is a 2009 and can be had all day long for around 6k.
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Old 11-21-2012, 06:58 PM   #92
scotty918
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Originally Posted by drsean View Post
The V-Star 950 Tourer might be a good fit. Comes equipped with windshield & locking hard bags. I've done 500+ mile days on this comfortabley. Motors down the highway at 80mph just fine. This particular example is a 2009 and can be had all day long for around 6k.
I'm gonna have to agree here... This is just a darn solid cruiser that can tour.
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Old 11-21-2012, 06:59 PM   #93
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Now, tell me why it is usually the back tire that gets the flat? At least, that has been my experience. Front's are so much easier to remove.
My theory is that the nail/screw/whatever is normally lying flat on the road to begin with so the front can roll over it safely. But, that action then flips it off the pavement so that sometimes it is in just the right position to puncture the rear tire when it comes along an instant later.
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Old 11-21-2012, 08:12 PM   #94
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I have to agree on the V-Star 950 Tourer. Air cooled, very simple design, looks comfortable, plenty big enough, cast wheels, tubeless tires, and belt drive. It should get the job done in style and comfort while requiring very little maintenance and pretty much no repairs for a VERY long time. Might just be my next bike when the Vulcan 750 wears out.
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Old 11-22-2012, 06:45 AM   #95
plugeye
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convert to a cruiser?

never.
whats the benefit for this compromise?
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Old 11-22-2012, 07:12 AM   #96
DaveBall OP
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Plugeye, I don't think it is a compromise.

The benefit to me would be a more modern bike that is comfortable for me to ride. I have upper back issues and carpal tunnel in both wrists. I have major issues if I try to ride anything with low bars and a lean forward position. I don't want a huge bike, as I am very happy with a bike under 1000cc. To me, bigger is not better. Over the past 40 years I have toured all over North America and Europe on bikes under 1000cc, with no problems. As with most riders, most of my riding is somewhat local (within 500 miles of home) and a couple of much longer rides per year on vacations. I have usually averaged around 20,000 miles per year, some years much more.

I have narrowed down my search for a replacement bike to the VStar 950 and the Vulcan 900. Have talked to local dealer who carries both. Now waiting for a good day (no rain) to take each out for a ride to see which one closest fits me. I think that either one will be a reliable replacement.

I would like to thank everyone for their input, as it all helped me with this decision. I had already narrowed things down, but your personal experiences and knowledge helped me understand a few things about cruisers and bikes that are not as antiquated as my current ride.

Now one last question. I like doing a lot of my own maintenance, but as the new bikes have a lot more electronics and stuff that an old backyard mechanic just can't work on. So, is it really worth while to get the extended warranty on either of these bikes? And does it cover things like the fuel injection system and any other computerized systems?
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Old 11-22-2012, 07:39 AM   #97
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Originally Posted by plugeye View Post
never.
whats the benefit for this compromise?
The V-Star 950 is a better riding bike than the Vulkan 900.
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Old 11-22-2012, 07:43 AM   #98
plugeye
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it depends on your needs. for me, all that street bike wiring & components are more of a burden than the benefit. not to mention the weight/ mass. this is why i ride minimal dualsport single-cylinders. fits my needs of commuter & everyday transportation.
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Old 11-22-2012, 10:49 AM   #99
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If that's the case he should just ride a recumbent tricycle. Comfort is there without any of the mechanical issues of having anything motorized. Weight/mass is far less than your single cylinder dual sport and he also reaps the benefit of staying in shape.
Look, the guy wants a cruiser for comfort. A dual sport won't cut it. Once you get up in age comfort is a primary issue in riding, more so if there are back problems. I think any mid size cruiser will work and work well. It's all a matter of which one appeals to you the most. The newer one are fuel injected and there is nearly no maintenance on that. Smooth running and easy starting is pretty much engineered into most cruisers.
By the way, that new Vulcan Custom looks pretty sharp. Just my 2 cents.
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Old 11-22-2012, 11:01 AM   #100
larryboy
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Now one last question. I like doing a lot of my own maintenance, but as the new bikes have a lot more electronics and stuff that an old backyard mechanic just can't work on. So, is it really worth while to get the extended warranty on either of these bikes? And does it cover things like the fuel injection system and any other computerized systems?

It's not a compromise for me, it's my go to reliable bike.


I have found one weak link on the 950, the starter is a pile of junk and so is the replacement. It has glued magnets instead of rivets and they fall off and kill the starter. If you hear starter drag, get your ass home 'cuz it's about done. I was working really close to home when the stock starter began dragging, I got another 6 months out of it before it jammed...got me home though. It costs $160 and about ten minutes time to replace, warranty isn't worth it to me, the rest of the bike is solid. If I were to ride to New York, I'd carry a spare starter.

20,000 miles on my 2009, starter has been the only issue and there was a recall on a fuel line that my local dealer took care of for me.
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Old 11-22-2012, 11:19 AM   #101
plugeye
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Originally Posted by Quedok View Post
Look, the guy wants a cruiser for comfort. A dual sport won't cut it. Once you get up in age comfort is a primary issue in riding
im already up there in age along with plenty of aches.
a decent seat, proper bars & low pegs fixes comfort issues.
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Old 11-22-2012, 04:34 PM   #102
jon_l
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Originally Posted by DaveBall View Post
Now one last question. I like doing a lot of my own maintenance, but as the new bikes have a lot more electronics and stuff that an old backyard mechanic just can't work on. So, is it really worth while to get the extended warranty on either of these bikes? And does it cover things like the fuel injection system and any other computerized systems?
Not me ever. The actuaries win most of the time. Extended warranties are a bad bet. Sure somebody will have a "it saved my ass" story, but save your money, and bet the way the smart money bets (with the house). You have narrowed your choices to 2 reliable machines. Skip the extra warranty, buy accessories or save your money for gas.
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Old 11-22-2012, 07:33 PM   #103
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OK, I was only wondering about the warranty as I have little to now ownership experience with brand new motorcycles The last new one I bought was in 1981, and I still have it. Back then, it came with a 5 year warranty for an extra $100. Not that I really used it, but it did include a steep discount on 2 major services over that time. They were real surprised when I pulled in for that last service in the 4th year with over 100,000 miles on it. But they still honoured it.

As the new bikes seem to be much better built and more reliable than 30+ year old ones were, I guess the extended warranty isn't really needed. I don't bother with extended warranties on anything else.

As to riding a dual sport or any other type of bike, sure it is an option, so is a hard tailed Harley, a Vespa scooter or even a Ducatti Monster. I could get on any of them, but seriously doubt I could ride very far in any sort of comfort. The reason they make all sorts of different bikes is to appeal to all different types of riders. Just like all the different styles of cars, boats, skis, computers, cameras, whatever. People have a lot of options and I think I have chosen one that will work for me.
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Old 11-22-2012, 08:09 PM   #104
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Dave,

If you decide on the Vulcan 900, look to invest in a Mustang or Corbin Saddle. I can't comment on the Yamaha 950 - but the Kaw Saddle is like a piece of plywood.
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Old 11-22-2012, 09:09 PM   #105
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C-Stain, I will keep that in mind. I have always been happy with the stock seat on my BMW, which a lot of people consider to be about equivelant to a slabe of 2x10. But with the new seating position, I may need something different. At least there are lots of after market ones to choose from.
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