ADVrider

Go Back   ADVrider > Bikes > GSpot > GS Boxers
User Name
Password
Register Inmates Photos Site Rules Search Today's Posts Mark Forums Read

Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread Display Modes
Old 11-16-2012, 06:16 AM   #1
slowrideOhio OP
n00b
 
Joined: Sep 2011
Oddometer: 5
Question Oil Change - then drip, drip, drip

I have an 07 RT, bought the bike used this year, just changed the oil for the first time.
Used a new crush washer, all went well, or so I thought.
Now I've got a very slight drip at the drain plug.

Are there any tricks to getting a good seal? I have had a k100rs for the last 5 years, so it wasn't my first oil change.
Do I need to loosen the drain plug, and try again? New crush washer?

Thanks,

Dean
slowrideOhio is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-16-2012, 06:24 AM   #2
mb90535im
'05 R1200 GS
 
mb90535im's Avatar
 
Joined: Jun 2008
Location: NW GA
Oddometer: 4,750
I've seen leaks when the old crush was washer left in place (stuck to the bottom of the pan) and the new washer installed along with it. Since you've done this before I assume that is not the issue.

Also, check the area around the plug for cracks in the pan.
__________________
"Dang man I'm impressed." - Willy-B
"Are you OK? ... Are you sure you're OK?" - Honcho
"Disturbing and funny, all at the same time." - MrTwisty
mb90535im is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-16-2012, 06:45 AM   #3
def
I've little to say
 
def's Avatar
 
Joined: Feb 2004
Location: The woods and mountains of Alabama
Oddometer: 8,318
If no cracks are found, I would merely slightly loosen the plug and re-snug the plug several times to smear the surface of the crush washer, thereby resealing the surfaces.
def is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-16-2012, 06:53 AM   #4
Dan-M
Studly Adventurer
 
Dan-M's Avatar
 
Joined: Aug 2007
Location: Steger, IL
Oddometer: 748
Quote:
Originally Posted by def View Post
If no cracks are found, I would merely slightly loosen the plug and re-snug the plug several times to smear the surface of the crush washer, thereby resealing the surfaces.
What he said. Back it off 1/4 turn and re-tighten.
__________________
---
Dan-M is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-16-2012, 07:25 AM   #5
slowrideOhio OP
n00b
 
Joined: Sep 2011
Oddometer: 5
Oil Drip

Thanks for the suggestions. I'll try backing off and retightening.
I'm pretty sure the old crush washer came off when I took the plug out.
slowrideOhio is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-16-2012, 07:31 AM   #6
scooteraug02
Dog Rancher
 
scooteraug02's Avatar
 
Joined: Feb 2003
Location: Atlanta, GA
Oddometer: 4,256
Did you torque it to the right spec. to make it crush. It seems like too much with the torque wrench so without you may not have crushed it.
__________________
scooteraug02 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-16-2012, 02:01 PM   #7
hillbillypolack
Grumpy Old Goat
 
hillbillypolack's Avatar
 
Joined: Jul 2005
Location: Lidsville
Oddometer: 5,599
Can't remember if you have the physical room, but if you do loosen it, see if you can spin the washer a little before snugging it down.
__________________
I found Jesus. He was behind the sofa the whole time.

1996 M900, "Patience" 2012 GS "Sonar" 2008 Megamoto "Big Blue" 2008 S2R "WTF"
hillbillypolack is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-16-2012, 03:19 PM   #8
Wolfgang55
Beastly Adventurer
 
Wolfgang55's Avatar
 
Joined: Dec 2006
Location: Next to Rio Bravo
Oddometer: 3,276
If the female threads are fatigued, this will cause a slow leak.
Wolfgang55 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-16-2012, 09:56 PM   #9
gr8grins
Gnarly Adventurer
 
Joined: Nov 2011
Location: PNW Dry
Oddometer: 172
Proper Torque?

I had the same problem on a previous boxer bike and I had not torqued it enough (got the wrong spec). Someone please correct me if I am still wrong - 24 ft/lbs then slowly to 32ft/lbs is what I was corrected to use and the leak stopped.
Good luck
grins
gr8grins is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-17-2012, 06:08 AM   #10
bemiiten
League of Adventures
 
bemiiten's Avatar
 
Joined: Jul 2003
Location: Hamilton NJ.
Oddometer: 4,768
Quote:
Originally Posted by gr8grins View Post
I had the same problem on a previous boxer bike and I had not torqued it enough (got the wrong spec). Someone please correct me if I am still wrong - 24 ft/lbs then slowly to 32ft/lbs is what I was corrected to use and the leak stopped.
Good luck
grins
IN/LBS !! My In/lbs torque wrench only goes to around 29 & with the threads always full of oil, I find that is more then enough to crush the washer.
bemiiten is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-17-2012, 07:30 AM   #11
mikegc
Beastly Adventurer
 
mikegc's Avatar
 
Joined: Sep 2008
Location: High Point, NC
Oddometer: 1,446
Oil Change - then drip, drip, drip

Quote:
Originally Posted by bemiiten View Post
IN/LBS !! My In/lbs torque wrench only goes to around 29 & with the threads always full of oil, I find that is more then enough to crush the washer.
I don't have an RT but on my '09 GSA, I drop the dirty oil and reinstall the drain plug (size M16 x 1.5 in) with one wrap of teflon tape and a new crush washer. I do an Initial torque to 23 Nm (17 ft-lbs). I put the fresh oil in and do a final touque to 32 Nm (24 ft-lbs). I called my dealer and he said the torque values were the same for a hexhead RT.

Mike
__________________
IBA 25881


Duty- Honoring a Friend
mikegc is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-17-2012, 07:34 AM   #12
def
I've little to say
 
def's Avatar
 
Joined: Feb 2004
Location: The woods and mountains of Alabama
Oddometer: 8,318
Quote:
Originally Posted by Wolfgang55 View Post
If the female threads are fatigued, this will cause a slow leak.
Threads (metric or SAE) are a poor means of sealing and are meant to hold tension not provide sealing...hence the use of a crush washer to provide the seal and avoid a leak.

When snugging a threaded plug, go slowly as you apply torque. You can easily feel the point where the plug begins to seal against the sealing washer. I do this on all my drain plugs from the lawn mower to the CAT diesel drain plug....never a leak and no damaged male or female threads. Same applies for spark plugs.

Also, I believe a torque wrench is of little or no use in these applications. Develop the correct feel for securing drain plugs and spark plugs. Reserve the torque wrench for securing high torque fasteners like lug nuts or wheel bolts.

I used to use my torque wrench to improve my tightening skills when I worked on the old Brit bikes in the 60s.

I found that I was stripping about one in five female threads when assembling the rocker box covers onto the cylinder heads (650 Triumphs were especially prone to this thread damage).

Some time with the torque wrench and a test fixture helped me reduce stripping to about one in twenty (those old alloy heads were very buttery and were not really capable of holding threads at appropriate torque).

Those of use who have been doing our own oil changes for years seem to over tighten the plugs. I have adopted the practice of using short handle tools and wrenches to help reduce the pressure I apply when snugging one of these threads. So far, it has worked.
def is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-17-2012, 09:10 AM   #13
scooteraug02
Dog Rancher
 
scooteraug02's Avatar
 
Joined: Feb 2003
Location: Atlanta, GA
Oddometer: 4,256
http://www.r1200gs.info/howto/oil-change.html



"Wipe off the mating surface, then reinstall the oil drain plug, shown above with the new crush-washer in place. Torque to 17 ft-lbs (23 Nm) initially, then to 24 ft-lbs (32 Nm). "
__________________
scooteraug02 is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Share

Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

.
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is On

Forum Jump


Times are GMT -7.   It's 09:17 PM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.5
Copyright ©2000 - 2014, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
Copyright ADVrider 2011-2014