ADVrider

Go Back   ADVrider > Riding > Regional forums > Canada
User Name
Password
Register Inmates Photos Site Rules Search Today's Posts Mark Forums Read

Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread Display Modes
Old 11-24-2012, 09:45 AM   #31
Maggot12
U'mmmm yeaah!!
 
Maggot12's Avatar
 
Joined: Feb 2010
Location: Barrie Ont
Oddometer: 2,933
I travelled across the country using hotels and I also crossed the country in a motorhome and im talking St. Johns's NF to Victoria BC and back to Halifax. The hotel way is a little more efficient and you obviously wont carry as much stuff. Camping will offer a much more memorable experience though. Sitting around a fire with a beverage and sharing stories cannot be over stated.

The cost of putting up a tent can be free if you so desire.

+1 on the ft long chicken breast sub. Youll have two pretty decent meals in that thing.
__________________
Maggot

Don't sweat the petty things; Pet the sweaty things !!!
Maggot12 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-24-2012, 12:53 PM   #32
teamgrizzly
Even more advanced n00b!
 
teamgrizzly's Avatar
 
Joined: Jan 2006
Location: British Columbia
Oddometer: 383
I usually prefer to camp. On longer trips though I do tend to stay in a hotel if the weather is crappy.

One thing that I have learned camping and backroad riding is to pack as lightly as possible. I usually shop for gear as if I'm going to pack it on my back. If you need it, it goes on the bike. If you only think you need it, then it stays at home. I would look at a small tent with vestibules to keep gear dry, lightweight sleeping pads and bags. You can roll up clothes in a stuff sack to make a pillow. Also keep in mind that you'll be in riding gear all the time so don't bring too much clothes. You can get sample sized stuff from Wal-mart for hygene. For cooking I have a MSR Pocketrocket butane stove, a pot, bowl and some utensils. I also take backpackers freeze dried food. For a longer trip I would do a mix of cooking and eating out. "Lightweight Backpacking" by Mike McClelland might give you some ideas too.

Also don't fret about taking everything. If I'm missing something I can always get it on the road. And if I have too much I can always stop at a post office and ship things back home. I did that with a pile of souvenirs from my cross Canada trip.

Don't be afraid to practice and modify your setup. If someone compared a picture of me and my setup from my first trip to today, there would be a noticeable difference.

So go out there and have fun.

Mike
__________________
Motorcycle nut in the Pacific Northwet - Teamgrizzly.ca Twitter: @TeamGrizzlyCA
Owner of 'Katyusha" my 2013 Ural Gear-Up. Proudly falling down the horsepower ladder, and having fun at the same time
6 Bikes, 1 Garage. Holy crap, I`ve turned into motorcycling`s equivalent to the crazy ol`cat lady.
teamgrizzly is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-24-2012, 12:58 PM   #33
BenZens
Adventurer
 
Joined: Sep 2012
Location: lost in Saskatchewan
Oddometer: 12
Quote:
Originally Posted by teamgrizzly View Post
Also don't fret about taking everything. If I'm missing something I can always get it on the road. And if I have too much I can always stop at a post office and ship things back home. I did that with a pile of souvenirs from my cross Canada trip.
I definitely agree with the mailing home option. I have done that on numerous trips. Where rather than stopping to do laundry I have just bought new clothes on the road and mailed the dirty stuff back home. I usually get home before the packages do. I will say you can get some interesting smells opening dirty laundry that is two weeks old.

Ben
BenZens is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-26-2012, 02:52 PM   #34
turnitonagain OP
Gnarly Adventurer
 
Joined: Aug 2012
Oddometer: 205
definitely agree on mostly everyone's posts. I will say that for the most part I'd like a good night sleep especially after riding say 8 - 10 hrs a day. Given any opportunity I'd try and stay within a hotel/motel setting only to really get myself, my gear, and my clothes a good rest/wash/recharge. Camping would suffice if I don't have the option to hotel it, and camping is great but not in the wet I've had bad experience with that already.

the problem I have is sticking to a set route because you come across things or hear things on the road that you automatically get sidetracked and want to go take a look at. So, there will be TONS of opportunities to do both given the chances to do so (Weather permitting of course).

I definitely am not planning on hauling everything and the kitchen sink NOPE. Not happening. Pack with what I need, and the occasional "what may be needed" but nothing more nothing less. Besides there is plenty of things to grab out there we are living in the 21st century 2012 everyplace, everywhere has stuff to be bought.
turnitonagain is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-01-2012, 04:30 PM   #35
alberta bob
Gnarly Adventurer
 
alberta bob's Avatar
 
Joined: Jan 2008
Oddometer: 222
camping

Camping cause i love it , but on road trips i only bring a therma rest mattress, tent and sleeping bag so i can stay overnight camping, when i feel like it.and stay at motels as well when wet . shorter road trips I bring all the cooking stuff and flyfishing gear and camp in the back country .
__________________
1990 gs100
2007 s4rs

Sabre
"The point is, you can survive. I did, and I'm no superhero. I'm just a man, full of faults and poison and sadness and hatred, full of joy and fears and pain and happiness, full of love for my fellow man and my kids and unfortunately not enough for myself, but I'm learning."
alberta bob is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-02-2012, 05:20 PM   #36
Timo Explorer
Trail Wizard
 
Timo Explorer's Avatar
 
Joined: Mar 2008
Location: Newmarket, Onterrible
Oddometer: 254
We camp for the most part. Always bring camping gear and hope for the best. Nothing like sitting around the campfire shooting the breeze with your buddies after long day of adventure. Usually plan to cook our own, but sometimes the Mom and Pop diners are hard to resist.
That being said, after several hours of wet weather and a complete soaking, the motel is a nice option.

One of the problems we are finding, especially on long weekends, is that you have to reserve months ahead for a campsite in any National, Provincial or State park, and you have to pay for all three nights otherwise you won't get in. A total rip-off for travellers. When the weather turns bad and we decide on a motel (plug for the Wawa Motor Inn and their life-saving motorcycle friendly policy), we have no trouble finding a room for the night, as even the motel crowd heads home if the weather gets bad enough to give up the campsite.

As for price, yes camping is getting more and more pricey, but given the choice and all costs being equal, I would rather camp. Check out any good backpacking equipment place for camping equipment, loads of great stuff out there at good prices.
__________________
There are no shortcuts to any place worth going.
"The adventure is worthwhile in itself." -- Amelia Earhart
"Candy is dandy, but liquor is quicker" -- Willy Wonka
"You can't stay young, but you can stay immature." -- Red Green
"Never leave spontaneity to chance." -- Neil Peart
Timo Explorer is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-03-2012, 10:25 AM   #37
rtw02
Gnarly Adventurer
 
Joined: Apr 2005
Location: B.C.
Oddometer: 291
Camping?

Lots of good advice here, BUT the real question is how do you Really feel about camping.
You have to be honest with yourself.
Do you want to camp or do you just think it would be nice to camp and maybe save some money.
Do you have enough room on your bike for all the gear?
Motorcycle camping involves a bit of work and preparation.
It is easier here in North America as there are campgrounds with basic services like water and toilets, but they come at a price.
Most will not have food available or close by so you will need to plan when and where you will get that organized earlier in the day(like when you stop for lunch).
Does your partner Really enjoy camping?
Weather is also a big factor.
You say you plan on riding 8-10 hours a day...that is an awful lot, even when ripping across the prairies. That wont leave much time for camp setup and cooking.
My wife and I like to camp and are probably more comfortable in our tent than a motel room.
We have evolved a routine and each have their own duties and so things "Usually" go fairly smoothly, but we have a huge topbox with all the gear which makes things easier.
About every third or fourth day you will need to motel it any way to clean and dry your stuff.
Having said all this, waking up in a wild camp somewhere up the Dempster and having the whole world to yourself is priceless...
rtw02 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-03-2012, 11:05 AM   #38
turnitonagain OP
Gnarly Adventurer
 
Joined: Aug 2012
Oddometer: 205
Quote:
Originally Posted by rtw02 View Post
Lots of good advice here, BUT the real question is how do you Really feel about camping.
You have to be honest with yourself.
Do you want to camp or do you just think it would be nice to camp and maybe save some money.
Do you have enough room on your bike for all the gear?
Motorcycle camping involves a bit of work and preparation.
It is easier here in North America as there are campgrounds with basic services like water and toilets, but they come at a price.
Most will not have food available or close by so you will need to plan when and where you will get that organized earlier in the day(like when you stop for lunch).
Does your partner Really enjoy camping?
Weather is also a big factor.
You say you plan on riding 8-10 hours a day...that is an awful lot, even when ripping across the prairies. That wont leave much time for camp setup and cooking.
My wife and I like to camp and are probably more comfortable in our tent than a motel room.
We have evolved a routine and each have their own duties and so things "Usually" go fairly smoothly, but we have a huge topbox with all the gear which makes things easier.
About every third or fourth day you will need to motel it any way to clean and dry your stuff.
Having said all this, waking up in a wild camp somewhere up the Dempster and having the whole world to yourself is priceless...
To me personally, camping gear is necessary in the event I can't find a Hotel/motel... do I like camping, I can tolerate it. I'm not against it IF I cannot find a motel/hotel/b and b .... I've been camping a few times and found myself enjoying the sleep but not the work involved in making my own lodgings but if i need to I will do so. If there is a hotel yes we will definitely stay.

besides I plan on riding a lot of the northern parts of the provinces once I hit Manitoba... I heard that a lot of the good stuff isn't until you reach Northern B.C., the Yukon, or NT. Isn't there something nice to see in Manitoba up until Alberta?
turnitonagain is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-03-2012, 11:29 AM   #39
GreatWhiteNorth
Beastly Adventurer
 
GreatWhiteNorth's Avatar
 
Joined: Dec 2009
Location: Winterpeg - site of flatness beyond belief
Oddometer: 1,576
Suggestions

Quote:
Originally Posted by turnitonagain View Post
... I heard that a lot of the good stuff isn't until you reach Northern B.C., the Yukon, or NT. Isn't there something nice to see in Manitoba up until Alberta?
Lots of cool things to see along the way... here's a few suggestions (listed east to west):
- MB - Whiteshell Prov Park, Lower Fort Garry (near Selkirk - http://www.pc.gc.ca/eng/lhn-nhs/mb/f...ry/natcul.aspx ) , Spruce Woods Prov Park (sand dunes!), Riding Mountain National Park (Duck Mountains/Baldy Mountain... the highest point in MB).
- SK - Qu'Appelle Valley ( http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Qu'Appelle_River ), Cypress Hills region ( the highest point in SK).
- AB - Dinosaur Prov Park (northeast of Brooks), Writing-On-Stone Prov Park (east of Milk River), Drumheller, Head-Smashed-In Buffalo Jump ( http://history.alberta.ca/headsmashedin/default.aspx ), Frank Slide ( http://www.history.alberta.ca/frankslide/ ). Good camping at or near all these things.
__________________
Spending my daughter's inheritance one motorcycle at a time.
Bikes currently owned: '91 Honda Gold Wing with sidecar, '92 Kawi KLR650 with Enduro sidecar, and '94 KLR650.
GreatWhiteNorth is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-03-2012, 01:28 PM   #40
DaveBall
Beastly Adventurer
 
DaveBall's Avatar
 
Joined: Sep 2009
Location: Vancouver Island
Oddometer: 1,154
I have done the total camping thing going across Canada and all over the USA and Mexico.Nowadays, I prefer to take a small tent and sleeping bag and will camp on occasion. But find that the costs involved quite often are very similar (within a few $) and camp grounds. Plus, my back prefers a good bed and a nice hot shower each morning.

I think one of my concerns these days would be the amount of people in the group. 3 or more, camping is great. Also, the time of year will make a difference. I do not enjoy camping in major bug season. Heck, I don't really like riding thru an area during a major bug outbreak. Spring thru Lake of the Woods is real pretty, till the bugs come out. Took a long time to wash the bugs out of the fins on the engines, Didn't even bother trying to clean the face shield on the helmet, it was so scratched up. Just bought a new face shield.

One thing to think about is camping in out of the way areas can lead to rude awakenings. 2 years ago, camping just off the Dempster Hwy, woke up to 2 bears snuffling around the bikes. We were very glad that we had NO food around the campsite.As soon as those bears were out of site we packed quickly and headed on our way.
DaveBall is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-03-2012, 01:38 PM   #41
catweasel67
Still a B.A.N
 
catweasel67's Avatar
 
Joined: Aug 2009
Location: Vienna, Austria
Oddometer: 7,594
I'd do both - they're a different experience and you meet more people camping but hotels are more comfortable and I find them to be a quicker in and quicker out experience.

I'd think about joining the KoA - their cabins are a pretty nice compromise and knowing where they are can help in route planning.
__________________
Planning NA 2010 NA 2010
Adriatic Loop August 09 Mandello Guzzi Protest Sept 09
"I've got the key to the gates of paradise...but I've got too many legs!!" Jeff
"Civilized men are more discourteous than savages because they know they can be impolite without having their skulls split, as a general thing." -- Robert E. Howard
catweasel67 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-03-2012, 05:51 PM   #42
anonny
What could go wrong?
 
anonny's Avatar
 
Joined: Mar 2007
Location: Beautiful Revelstoke BC
Oddometer: 5,425
We do both as well, when making "big miles" we motel to save time, when we get to our destination or riding an area and doing smaller rides we camp.
__________________
Kawasaki H1 build thread

71- 450 Honda CL re & re

Just another pathetic sheep following the herd

anonny is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 12-07-2012, 05:24 AM   #43
turnitonagain OP
Gnarly Adventurer
 
Joined: Aug 2012
Oddometer: 205
wow folks, very informative..... I took a nice look at the places and spots and they look breathtaking. I'm so excited to do this thing!
turnitonagain is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-07-2012, 06:30 AM   #44
Suitcase
Suitcase
 
Suitcase's Avatar
 
Joined: Oct 2011
Location: Rocky Mountain Trench BC
Oddometer: 15
Gear

Getting the rite gear is uber important to make camping enjoyable. What i look for is dual purpose gear that can double for bike camping an backpacking. In both adventures light weight and compactness are absolutley necessary.
Setting up your motorcycle for a long haul is a trial and error endeavour....in all aspects from how much toolkit to pack, sizing and fitting saddlebags, tankbags (get the biggest tankbag you can find) tailracks and cases. Learning to load the bike quickly and most importantly Securely will take practice. Bungees are ok...but cam type cinch straps are better. Dont forget to tweak your rear suspension to accomodate the additional weight of gear.
Some bazic camp/on tour essentials for North America. ...small axe/hatchet - bear spray and poppers - parachute type cord - 8 x 10 tarp - couple of flashlites - dry sacks - good rain gear including boots - bbq style long nose lighters - .

Get to know your bike. ....uhh mechanically that is. That knowledge will help in deciding how big a toolkit to carry.It may also save you from a breakdown on the road. Unlike travel in a cage...you really have to check your bike daily to avoid problems. If you got chain drive it will need lube regularly and with long miles going on daily it will need adjusting.

Once you get the hang of camp site set up and outdoor food prep belive me...you will avoid motels except for extreme weather shelter. Nothing beats a 2 or 3 dish meal cooked on a fire followed by a double shot of sambuca before crawlin into a sleeping bag under the stars.

If BC is on your agenda..pm me for a coffee and ride meet.
Suitcase is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-07-2012, 06:43 AM   #45
Suitcase
Suitcase
 
Suitcase's Avatar
 
Joined: Oct 2011
Location: Rocky Mountain Trench BC
Oddometer: 15
Quote:
Originally Posted by hewhohesit8s View Post
I've been going on August road trips for 5 years now and the number of nights I spend camping has decreased from 10 (of 30) the first year to 2 (of 28) this year and I'm not sure i'll even take the camping gear next year. I don't mind riding in the rain, but dislike setting up and tearing down in the rain. I usually live blog the trips so motels are more convenient for that too. As long as you start looking for a place a few hours before sunset, you can always find a town with an available room. (I hate to drive between dusk and dawn).

Like others have said there is not a big price difference between camping and moteling. Plus, for me, it's more about the riding and the talking about the ride than camping (and the bugs that that entails).

I'm willing to admit that my preference for motels gets stronger the older I get.
Gettin old or gettin soft??? From an ex KWerite.
Suitcase is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Share

Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

.
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is On

Forum Jump


Times are GMT -7.   It's 10:19 PM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.5
Copyright ©2000 - 2014, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
Copyright ADVrider 2011-2014