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Old 11-20-2012, 02:12 AM   #16
atomicalex
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Agree with the above. You did a good job of switching bikes- maybe too good! Changing everything (front tyre, powerband, gearing, weight distribution, steering geometry, suspension) all at once might have been too much for you to just roll with.

However... You're not dropping it every day. So you do know how to ride it. You have figured out what the differences are, and their magnitudes. This is key.

I think you just need to put in a lot of low-speed practice time. Basic excercises. Get your muscle memory reset to handle the new bike.

You won't turn it into a Triple. The dealer can't help there, and neither can Touratech. But you can turn yourself into a GS rider. Whether that's desirable or not, well...
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Old 11-20-2012, 04:14 AM   #17
foxtrapper
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ItalianRider View Post
Could be.

I always "felt" the Triple. I always knew what the bike was doing.

This one I don't feel at all.
This may be it in a nutshell for you. We've all had or ridden bikes that were just wrong for us. This one may simply be a very wrong bike for you, and one you cannot or do not handle well.

Perhaps you can modify the bike, and certainly taking an advanced rider MSF course would help. But, if you really aren't happy with the bike, sometimes the best choice is to replace the bike with one you are happy with.
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Old 11-20-2012, 04:25 AM   #18
Pantah
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I think you just don't know how to ride yet. You have zero sense for what your motorcycle is capable of or not. If you survive you will eventually stop falling off and become somewhat competant in most conditions.
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Old 11-20-2012, 05:37 AM   #19
ferrol
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I had a stalling issue on my GS when I got it, came from Honda so wasn't used to the differnence in engine.

Later realised the GS needs more throttle/RPM to be happy on slow manoeuvres, this learnt after dropping it twice on either side with 2 weeks of getting it. But I had just fitted the engine bars so was a good test.

You don't stop learning when riding I found. (Not sure if I phrased that right but you get my point)
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Old 11-20-2012, 06:47 AM   #20
lulo
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my .2 cents ....as you have already guessed it the issue is probably that your trying to ride your f700 like your triple, and theyre 2 worlds appart handling wise.

for instance i now own a buell xb12 and a klr, i dont ride my uly like i ride my klr, front end feel is worlds appart.... its all mostly the wheel size and spring rate/suspension

while the small 17 fatty wheel is more planted, the larger slightly narrower 19' wheel gives a more vague feel to the whole suspension, your over turning that big slim wheel just to get to get it to do the same the small wheel used to do w just subtle inputs, thats why sportier bikes have fattier smalller 17 wheels, to make it flick easier from side to side, where on the f700 meant to go on unpaved roads you want that larger wheel which wheel feel more planted going over rocks and large potholes.

spring rates are a key issue here, on the street oriented bike the spring rate is stiffer hence pushing the tyre more into the ground... plus you have a wide range of load adjustment between soft and hard.....on your 700 i dont believe there any preload adjustment at all and even if so, this bike is geared more towards riding in diff terrains hence a more neutral softy rate from factory, when going off road a softer spring rate is good cause it will absorb the rocks bumps and potholes but on the street a spring rate that soft just makes the bike feel unplanted and undisconnected to the road.

when leaning my klr over on turns i have little to no feel, im overcompensating in my mind and my steer imputs accordingly but its because ive ridden enough where i can almost tell what my front end is doing.

also dont forget, no matter what tyre you use, this time of year tyres loose a lot of grip due to both tyre and road temperature, sitting at a traffic light or an intersection for too long depending the time of day will effectively cool down your tyre completly, if you drive off harshly it will peel offf right away.

re the bike stalling several times, like somebody already pointed out, i would first address your clutch engaging point, then if the issue persists i would see if something else is making the bike stall.

im in nj as well, right off the lincoln tunnel, hit me up, i will gladly take you out for a calm ride on a sunday and we can go into detail, also during the week or saturdays we can go in the parking lots of giant stadium/meadowlands and practice low speed manuvering, body position, applying power and such, help you get comfortable so you wont go down again.
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lulo screwed with this post 11-20-2012 at 06:57 AM
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Old 11-20-2012, 07:19 AM   #21
390beretta
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Pantah View Post
I think you just don't know how to ride yet. You have zero sense for what your motorcycle is capable of or not. If you survive you will eventually stop falling off and become somewhat competant in most conditions.
What Pantah said. It sounds to me that you're riding waaay over your skill level and doing "crazy shit" will eventually catch up with you. Don't mean this as a put down. Good luck!
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Old 11-20-2012, 07:42 AM   #22
siclmn
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When I ride in the wet, I pretend it's ice. I just don't ever want to go down on my 620 lb bike. That is called respect. Don't get me wrong, in the dry it's a whole other story. But in the wet I respect it.
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Old 11-20-2012, 07:46 AM   #23
ItalianRider OP
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Originally Posted by 390beretta View Post
What Pantah said. It sounds to me that you're riding waaay over your skill level and doing "crazy shit" will eventually catch up with you. Don't mean this as a put down. Good luck!
Not a put down ... that's what I feel like right now. A beginner.

It seems that if you switch types of bikes (not just models ... but TYPES), you become a beginner all over again.
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Old 11-20-2012, 08:05 AM   #24
ItalianRider OP
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I slept over it ...

I am 99% convinced that there's nothing wrong with the bike and it's my fault at this point ... so any tips or pointers anyone can offer ... I'll take it.

It wasn't by accident that I chose this bike. I wanted an adventure bike ... because I wanted to go on adventure rides. I did take this bike gingerly over unpaved roads and incredibly the bike feels "better" than on roads. It might just all be in my head.

I MUST learn how to ride this bike safely.

Even if it means that I need to admit that I don't know squat and I have to re-learn everything.

I'll start by amputating my ego and my pride.

... done.

I don't know $hit.

Let's re-start from there.

PS: the 1% is that I rode the bike to work this morning and tried to keep the RPMs higher ... and made a conscious effort to keep the engine in the right place so it wouldn't stall. The bike still stalled. It happened in stop and go traffic, while upright, so no harm done. But this has been happening way often than it's normal for me. I never had this problem with any other bike I owned (Ninja 250, Versys and Speed Triple). I am not an experienced rider by any stretch of the imagination but I should be able to handle the clutch after 10,000+ miles this year, and 3 different bikes in the last couple of years ... shouldn't I? I'm thinking that the engine stalling problem might be something "extra" ...
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Old 11-20-2012, 08:20 AM   #25
Aussijussi
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Your coordination and balance don't seem to agree with the controls of the bike. Blaming the bike is just nonsense. Might be 205, but i would suggest, get on a dirt bike, 200 will do, and get yourself sorted out on that. Moto gp riders practice riding moto cross, some like Hayden do supermoto, Mika Kallio does ice racing. When you learn to ride on dirt, the tight stuff especially, it teaches you to be be sharp with the controls. I know there are people that reckon it makes no difference what you start on, be it street or a dirt bike. I know it has saved me countless times, having the skill's i learned on dirt.
Without trying to give you hard time, you're not riding just because your mate's ride? I still think after 50 some years of riding, that motorcycle's are not dangerous. I also think there are lot of people out there riding that shouldn't be, those video's on ' Dragon' are a good example. I hope you'll find an answer to your predicament, riding a motorcycle is a lifestyle, not a hobby!
Good luck with it mate!
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Old 11-20-2012, 09:18 AM   #26
Arrowhead300
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Your experiance is another good reason it's not a great idea to let someone "try out" your adventure bike. Just because they ride doesn't mean they won't drop yours.
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Old 11-20-2012, 09:21 AM   #27
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Maybe something's wrong with the bike, it shouldn't stall that easily.

I agree that learning to ride a dirt bike well would do wonders for your riding generally and will be especially applicable to dual-sport-ish bikes on and off road. Really not that expensive, huge fun and definitely worth doing. Go buy a KDX200 or something and run a harescrambles series for a year. By the end of it you'll be a more capable rider than probably 98% of the folks out there on adv-styled bikes.

The F bike won't have the grip your S3 had, probably explains the low side.

To keep from falling when/if you stall in a turn grab the clutch real quick and tight up the turn enough to make the bike straight before you loose all momentum.

Maybe re-take a couple of those classes on the F bike. That's probably the biggest thing--you got really comfortable on the S3 and did all the training on it and aren't that acclimated to the F bike.
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Old 11-20-2012, 09:49 AM   #28
holckster
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Concentrate on LOOKING where you want to go.
Critical at any speed, especially slow speed.
Look down and that is where you will go.
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Old 11-20-2012, 10:28 AM   #29
BingoRyder
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You are getting to close to the ground

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Old 11-20-2012, 10:35 AM   #30
Treedguy
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Originally Posted by BikePilot View Post
Maybe something's wrong with the bike, it shouldn't stall that easily.
This.

Also have you adjusted the suspension?
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