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Old 11-23-2012, 08:36 PM   #1
gone fishing OP
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Ducati 900ss CR

Found one local to me on craiglist. Yellow, forks reworked, and the 41mm K carbs added. 11k miles and looks good. Thought the price seemed a little low, but after getting home and searching prices, they dont seem to hold their value. Always thought it would be neat to try one, but how come nobody seems to want them? My other concern is parts availability. Any opinions?
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Old 11-24-2012, 01:11 AM   #2
edmoto
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Having owned a 95 CR, I remember even back in the day the CR was considered the bastard son of the full on SS (Super Sports). Half fairing on the CR? Simplified suspension? I think it had a slightly smaller rear rim... it priced out at $7,000 or so new, versus the $10,000 or so Super Sports. The SS's were considered the iconic look and sound of the 2 valve 900cc bikes.

I suspect those may be some of the reasons the CR doesn't hold its value as well as the SS's. From your description of the bike you picked up, the previous owner addressed many of the perceived shortcomings of the CR as compared to the SS.

If I had the resources I would get a CR again without hesitation. Mostly for the 2 valve motor, a motor I miss. Aside from the carb not having a de-icing circuit for riding in very cold weather, I never had a problem with the bike. Can't say the same for the 851 and 748 I've owned.

Parts shouldn't be impossible to find. You'll more than likely have to search a bit for items, but they are out there. I'd have no fear finding parts for the motor, and with the exception of plastics everything else should be floating around out there in one form or another.

---> Just saw the bike in CL. In Roanoke, yes? Looks like a good purchase. Just know that riding that type of bike is not similar to other bikes of that class/category (apologies for assuming you haven't owned a Ducati if in fact you have). Steering lock makes for very large turns, they can get a little uncomfortable on longer rides due to the ergonomics, and valve adjustments are every 6,000 miles. If you are not mechanically inclined, a dealer will be happy to bend you over for what can be a relatively simple task. If I was closer to VA, I would consider that bike myself at $2K, that's not bad!
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edmoto screwed with this post 11-24-2012 at 01:26 AM
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Old 11-24-2012, 01:20 AM   #3
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Brilliant bike. Condition and the owners general attitude are more important than age or mileage.

Not quite as quick as the 8V bikes, but a bit easier to live with and will reward you when you're pottering and not just going for it.

Dealer servicing will be expensive (but not as bad as the 8valvers). DIY servicing will be no more expensive than any jap 4. Do not ignore any items at a service. Make sure you do it all or it will go badly wrong, but if you serevice it properly you'll have no problems.

Setting the valve clearances is a but scary the first time but in reality is no more difficult than any other valve job.

On a bike with unknown history ALWAYS change the belts before you run the engine in earnest.

Rattly clutch is normal and cheapish to fix. Clutch slave cylinders will fail - buy an aftermarket one. Electrics are better than their reputation would suggest.

Most engine & chassis parts interchangeable with Monster or regular SS. Brakes common to Monster, SS, superbikes.

FCR41s are worth a fortune on their own. When you sell it put a set of standard carbs on the bike and sell the FCRs separately.

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Old 11-24-2012, 05:11 AM   #4
gone fishing OP
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Yes. That bike is the one. I looked at it yesterday and the owner let me take it for a ride. It ran well. I did notice the steering lock when trying to get it out of the building. Thought it was odd that it didnt have a choke till I read up on the pumper carbs. Do all my own maint, so I'm not afraid of learning a new routine. The closest dealer is about 4 hours away, so mail order is going to have to be the way to go. Really dont think its a everyday bike, more of a get it out on Sunday afternoon, fun bike.
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Old 11-24-2012, 06:03 AM   #5
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i bought a '96 cr back in august. other than a carb rebuild (mikuni flat-slides) it has been a wonderful bike. ergo's are very sporty, but not as radical as the new stuff. pure joy to ride. the sounds that these bikes make are addictive! post us a picture.
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Old 11-24-2012, 07:21 AM   #6
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Troll through the below hyperlinked forum to reference that bike versus the market. And to get input on the condition and mods people do to those types of bikes compared to the one listed in CL. In comparison, you'd have a deal on that bike you reference.

http://www.ducati.ms/forums/128-bikes/
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edmoto screwed with this post 11-24-2012 at 12:06 PM
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Old 11-24-2012, 07:31 AM   #7
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To me, a pre-'96 CR with flatslides and a set up suspension for $2k is a great deal. Generally though, I'd look for the newest SP I could find because they typically sell for not much more than a CR.

I've owned two 900ss's, a '97 SP and a '95 CR. I sold my CR back in 2000 to buy a 996. I sold my SP about a year ago to buy a Hypermotard, but am now jonesing for another SS. They are great bikes for real world use, as compared to the Superbikes which SUCK as streetbikes (that said I am NOT selling my 996 any time soon). My SP's suspension had been modified and set up for me so it was probably the best suspension I've ever owned, which had a lot to do with how much I liked the bike.

Nobody wants them now in part because of the maintenance rep. If you don't work on your own bike they are expensive to own, and they are getting old enough some dealers may not even work on them anymore. If you DO work on your own bike they're not bad. You don't have to adjust the valves every 6000 miles, you have to check them. Once they settle in they don't need to be adjusted very often. The collets wear and if you want to spend the money you can buy aftermarket parts that work better and make them even more stable. I live in a place with winter so it wasn't a hassle at all to have to work on the bike once a year. (I have multiple bikes and don't remember the last time I put 6000 mile on one bike in a season. Likely never...)

Even when new they were yestertech bikes so the go fast crowd was never interested in them. The 916 was the halo bike everyone (thought they) wanted, and even those are relatively affordable right now.

IMHO the 900ss is the best deal going for a Ducati right now. You can buy nice SPs for under $4k, often closer to $3k. Be prepared to spend some money getting it into shape though. By now a lot of them have been owned by casual fans who have neglected them, and they are getting old. Electrical connections are getting corroded, starter motors are in need of attention, etc.

Here's a page I put together about what I had to do to the last one I bought. The bike in question here sounds like it's in much better shape though.

http://www.teamyikes.com/SuperSport/used900.html

What I don't like about the SS... The seat is horrible. Some don't mind it, I bought a Sargent seat off of eBay. The stock suspension is WAY too harsh. I'm convinced this has a lot to do with the problem of frames cracking on the earlier bikes. The mirrors are always floppy. The fixes I tried were temporary, they always ended up sagging. Stock gearing is too tall, but that has likely been changed by now anyway.

Not a fault of the bike, but the popular airbox mod (removing the lid) is painfully loud at around 4000rpm. I put a lid back on my SP.

Long story short if you're thinking you'd like to try out Ducati ownership I think that bike would be a great intro to the brand (having not seen it myself, general disclaimers, etc).

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Old 11-24-2012, 07:34 AM   #8
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They are fantasticly fun bikes! I love mine!
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Old 11-24-2012, 08:33 AM   #9
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Check the frame for cracks, I think they are prone to failure near the steering tube. Do a search on ducati.ms for details. I owned a 93 750SS and it was a sweet handling bike, partly because it only had 1 front disk. I think the CR version of the 750/900 is one of the best looking bikes Ducati ever made. The 2V air-cooled motors are cheap to run and last quite a while compared to the water cooled superbikes.
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Old 11-24-2012, 11:57 AM   #10
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^ Ditto. I seem to remember that the CRs (as opposed to the regular SS) had an issue with the frame that was he subject of a recall. Check the frame closely and make sure it has at least been inspected by a certified Ducati tech.

I agree though, it's a fantastic looking bike, and for $2K, it's a deal.
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Old 11-24-2012, 08:23 PM   #11
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96 900ss/cr

here's some easy mods i did to my 96 900ss/cr:

simple improvement with excellant results on my bike was installing racetech springs. can be done with the forks in the bike. $122 shipped. huge improvement in ride quality, and i actually could then match front / rear sag.

installed the $15 Nicholls side-stand bolt. if you breathe on these bikes, they'll tip over. that's why so many have cracked left-hand blinkers/fairings.

remove the mirrors and snug up the center bolt. you won't have any probs there.

remove the reg/rectifier and clean/lube the connections. many failures here are caused by corrosion

remove the starter lead and lube it. the little rubber cap is inverted, and traps water.

sand all ground connections. you'll find an extra one near the right-side engine bolt. many folks purchase aftermarket "kits" with larger gauge wire. not needed.

stock seat sux. badly. replace with a sargent or corbin. (plug: i have a used corbin for small bux if you need one).

i loosen the belt tension in the off-season.

some day when you need a battery, get a sealed unit. the stock battery vent tube drains toward the rear rim. you'll get acid stains there when really leaned over. damhik

install a 100w headlight. no probs for 4 season, but the connections were clean/lubed.

when replacing tires, i upsized to the sp spec. looks cool, but you have to shim up the front fender a tad.

don't let the "SP" boyz go on about their aluminum swingarm: the steel ones don't crack.

OEM spring rate was way too soft, resulting in the front bottoming out here/there. that, coupled with lousy welds at the steering head, led to a small crack. tig-welding is best there. check the area with a lighted 10x mag glass.

go +3 on the rear sprocket. i used a vortex aluminum, no issues.

when the clutch plates wore out, i used Barnette. cheaper than OEM and you get a kewl sticker.
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Old 11-25-2012, 01:51 PM   #12
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Love them 900crs! Don't know why I've never owned one???
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Old 11-25-2012, 02:09 PM   #13
vicster
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I've looked at these also, but don't know what year Ducati went to the plastic tanks?
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Old 11-25-2012, 03:22 PM   #14
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Quote:
Originally Posted by vicster View Post
I've looked at these also, but don't know what year Ducati went to the plastic tanks?
None of the '98 and earlier style Super Sports have plastic tanks.
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Old 11-25-2012, 05:51 PM   #15
noman
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plastic

according to "der google", plastic tanks started in 2003.
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