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Old 12-01-2012, 11:29 AM   #16
miguelito OP
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Originally Posted by kantuckid View Post
I wont bore you with details of my mostly failed attempt to learn Spanish via immersion & a school in Oaxaca (good school/very fun stay/too old I think!) but the one I have the most trouble with is FOOD! I have several Spanish books,dictionaries & have done searches before to try for a concise "carry list" to use in a restaurant for supper meal, to no avail . I know some but not all I need. I always see lots of words that just aren't the ones you need to ask or order food. We cook Mexican food @ home often, as in real often but I still see menus with lots of unknown words. In a touristy locale of course there's no problem. Help!
P.S., I definitely don't need a list of beers...
My approach with menus which I don't really understand is first to ask what it is/how it's cooked, and if like you said, not having the language skills to interpret the response, I'll just pick one at random from the menu. That way next time you'll know what that particular offering is.


Quote:
Originally Posted by Throttlemeister View Post
Last new word I learned down in Latin America was: dolor= pain
That's a good one. I've been using it lately since I injured my lower back, (with a herniated disc). I've been asking the Pemex attendants if they would check the air in my tires, as I hurt my back = Puedes cheqeuer el aire en las llantas porque tengo mucho dolor en mi espalda.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Misery Goat View Post
don't forget "No fumar Espanol."
Apart from el crashmaestro's report, and slightly off-topic, more and more towns and restaurants here in Mexico are becoming non-smoking. Who'd a thunk it?
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Old 12-01-2012, 10:18 PM   #17
rcroese
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When traveling through Latin America you will need the answers to three questions from the locals, including the police or at military checkpoints:
¿De dónde vienes? Where are you coming you from?
¿A dónde vas? Where are you going?
¿Cuánto vale la moto? How much does your motorcycle cost?
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Old 12-02-2012, 04:05 AM   #18
MikeMike
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If you do any riding in Latin America it is a good idea to get a couple of stickers made up that say:

En el caso de accidente no me quites el casco

And put them on your helmet in conspicuous locations.

A long time ago a Mexican insurance company used to give these away at bike shows down here.
And yes, "quitar" is used correctly in this case. The verb "remove" can be expressed a couple of different ways but this is the conventional usage. There are a couple of ways you can phrase it, all will work, this one works fine throughout Latin America.

A helluva lot more useful than some dumb gringo using the verb "chingar" at the wrong time with the wrong people in the wrong place. Having a handful of phrases and then telling someone "fuck off" in their language is going to get you laughed at. A lot. Stick to the useful stuff and learn the "verga" vernacular when you can actually communicate with someone.
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Old 12-02-2012, 07:54 AM   #19
rcroese
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Originally Posted by MikeMike View Post
A helluva lot more useful than some dumb gringo using the verb "chingar" at the wrong time with the wrong people in the wrong place. Having a handful of phrases and then telling someone "fuck off" in their language is going to get you laughed at. A lot. Stick to the useful stuff and learn the "verga" vernacular when you can actually communicate with someone.
Amen, brother! I speak several languages and I have always believed that the substandard or more colorful vernacular should be left only to the native speakers. There is nothing worse than hearing a foreigner curse you (or trying to be funny) in your mother tongue.
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Old 12-02-2012, 09:19 AM   #20
H96669
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You guys have to put "La izquierda" y "La derecha" in them useful phrases/words.
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Old 12-02-2012, 09:34 AM   #21
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This works for me http://www.jibbigo.com/website/
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Old 12-02-2012, 02:20 PM   #22
kantuckid
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Pissed

But not me! I have a "contractor cell phone" while my wife has currently turned me into a widower via her new i phone.
I have WAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAY more interest in a new MC than something I cannot even see... Thanks for the genuine suggestion, no offense! Actually, I eat too much for supper in Mexico & most of the time figure stuff out. It is amazing that in a home with many(pre internet) Mexican cookbooks & having been around that cultures food for many years in my own home, that I still cannot figure out a lot of the food or how it's prepared. Understand that I'm not talking about the menus in Taco Bell(definitely not, except as a last resort) or Tex-Mex chain,or even a locally owned USA Mexican restaurant.

kantuckid screwed with this post 12-02-2012 at 02:26 PM
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Old 12-03-2012, 08:10 AM   #23
miguelito OP
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Quote:
Originally Posted by MikeMike View Post
If you do any riding in Latin America it is a good idea to get a couple of stickers made up that say: En el caso de accidente no me quites el casco. And put them on your helmet in conspicuous locations.
Good advice, but I'll file that under the subsection: "I also haven't included some of the standard phrases that portend tragedy while traveling".



Quote:
Originally Posted by OurBC View Post
Looks good, but like Kentuckid, I'd need to upgrade my phone, so probably not gonna work for me.


Quote:
Originally Posted by H96669 View Post
You guys have to put "La izquierda" y "La derecha" in them useful phrases/words.
Those are very good, as well as "derecho" for straight ahead. I think I'll add them to the body of the post.


Quote:
Originally Posted by rcroese View Post
When traveling through Latin America you will need the answers to three questions from the locals, including the police or at military checkpoints:
¿De dónde vienes? Where are you coming you from?
¿A dónde vas? Where are you going?
¿Cuánto vale la moto? How much does your motorcycle cost?
The first two are in the post, and the third, I think could as easily be said: Cuanto cuesta su moto?, (which is already in the post). You can tell them the new cost or the Blue Book value, (or less if you think they're pricing it out for resale after they steal it :) ) The other question I get as often as "how much does it cost?", is "How fast does it go?" - ¿Qué es la velocidad maxima de su moto?
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Old 02-27-2013, 10:44 AM   #24
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That's a cool idea, Miguelito, me gusta su listo de frases. But I did notice that on some of your dialogues you show the respectful manner of address while in others you show the familiar manner. Now I know countries differ in their take on this, but I can relate with significant confidence that if you walked up to a hotel clerk in Ecuador and asked like this "Tienes una habitacion [disponible] para la noche?", unless it was a kid, the person would be highly likely to suspect you. Of course, once they realize you really don't speak the language, and you'er not really a pendejo, then all will be smoothed over. Yet it would be to advantage to use 'Tiene Usted una habitacion [disponible] por la noche?' instead.

Great pictures! I'd love to know where that sunset over the city from a hillside shot from your friend Margo is. I know it's not, but it reminds me of the view of Cuenca from the Turi overlook.

Quote:
Originally Posted by MikeMike View Post
..En el caso de accidente no me quites el casco...
... using the verb "chingar" at the wrong time with the wrong people in the wrong place. Having a handful of phrases and then telling someone "fuck off" in their language is going to get you laughed at. A lot. Stick to the useful stuff and learn the "verga" vernacular when you can actually communicate with someone.
Sin duda! You may be lucky if being laughed at a lot is the extent of their reaction.
Cool idea with the helmet sticker. I'd go with 'quiten' - more respectful and talks to the whole group.

If they're asking cuanto vale something of mine, I'll depend on whether I have confianza (trust) in the person or not. Downplay to someone desconocido (unknown), or expound upon for an amigo genuinely interested. That would be true anywhere but extra caution in Latin America because it's a lot easier for them to give a conceited person their due.

It's interesting how most people everywhere think in terms of how fast one can go, as opposed to how quickly it can get there. But I digress....

Que le vaya bien!
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Let's ride!!! - No offense, but there've been a lot of people over time who were just as sure, yet got it wrong. - Una necedad, aunque la repitan millones de bocas, no deja de ser una necedad. - "you know that I could have me a million more friends and all I'd have to lose is my point of view" (Prine)
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Old 02-27-2013, 09:13 PM   #25
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Useful phrases

Que puta!
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Riding the Americas:
No Fumar Español
- Terminado.
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Old 02-28-2013, 02:36 AM   #26
miguelito OP
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ONandOFF View Post
That's a cool idea, Miguelito, me gusta su listo de frases. But I did notice that on some of your dialogues you show the respectful manner of address while in others you show the familiar manner. Now I know countries differ in their take on this, but I can relate with significant confidence that if you walked up to a hotel clerk in Ecuador and asked like this "Tienes una habitacion [disponible] para la noche?", unless it was a kid, the person would be highly likely to suspect you. Of course, once they realize you really don't speak the language, and you'er not really a pendejo, then all will be smoothed over. Yet it would be to advantage to use 'Tiene Usted una habitacion [disponible] por la noche?' instead.

Great pictures! I'd love to know where that sunset over the city from a hillside shot from your friend Margo is. I know it's not, but it reminds me of the view of Cuenca from the Turi overlook.



Sin duda! You may be lucky if being laughed at a lot is the extent of their reaction.
Cool idea with the helmet sticker. I'd go with 'quiten' - more respectful and talks to the whole group.

If they're asking cuanto vale something of mine, I'll depend on whether I have confianza (trust) in the person or not. Downplay to someone desconocido (unknown), or expound upon for an amigo genuinely interested. That would be true anywhere but extra caution in Latin America because it's a lot easier for them to give a conceited person their due.

It's interesting how most people everywhere think in terms of how fast one can go, as opposed to how quickly it can get there. But I digress....

Que le vaya bien!
Thanks on&off. My Spanish is an amalgam of what I've learned talking to locals, studying my English/Spanish dictionary, and what I've retained from 4 years of high school Spanish. The finer points of nuance are often lost on me unless someone, such as yourself takes the time to point them out to me, so thanks for doing so. I will go back and edit my post to reflect your suggestion. The pic by my friend Margo is of the town we both live in, San Miguel de Allende, GTO.


Quote:
Originally Posted by crashmaster View Post
Que puta!
But that's a whole other lesson, and as someone stated previously, it's a lot better to leave the insults to those who actually speak the language and feign ignorance in the face of adversity: "No fumar Espanol?"
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Old 02-28-2013, 05:07 AM   #27
tricepilot
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Television provides today's Spanish phrase book

And, fodder for future ride report titles
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Old 02-28-2013, 07:09 AM   #28
Cal
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Originally Posted by crashmaster View Post
Que puta!
Picked that one up this summer from a passing Guaterider
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Old 02-28-2013, 08:11 AM   #29
GuateRider
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Originally Posted by crashmaster View Post
Que puta!
Finally !!! I have been waiting quiet some time for you to come up with this




Quote:
Originally Posted by Cal View Post
Picked that one up this summer from a passing Guaterider
Hey Cal, did you ever hear me saying this ???
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Old 02-28-2013, 08:32 AM   #30
ONandOFF
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Originally Posted by miguelito View Post
... The pic by my friend Margo is of the town we both live in, San Miguel de Allende, GTO. ...
Looks estupendo, miguelito! In the middle of the country among lakes and mountains... sweetness!

We'll get down that way some day amigo, my Ecuatoriana and I; might have to see if you're still there and up to meet.
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Let's ride!!! - No offense, but there've been a lot of people over time who were just as sure, yet got it wrong. - Una necedad, aunque la repitan millones de bocas, no deja de ser una necedad. - "you know that I could have me a million more friends and all I'd have to lose is my point of view" (Prine)
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