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Old 12-20-2012, 08:16 AM   #31
Jackazz
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Quote:
Originally Posted by levain View Post
Alright, something like this seems perfect in lots of ways, but I have some questions mostly related to this particular ad.
-oil changed after every ride? Huh? Does that need to happen? Can't imagine. I definitely don't have what it takes for such a high maintenance machine if that is the case. However, buying a bike from someone that anal would be ideal

-Does it not come from the factory with a sidestand?

-Is this really a street legal bike? I assume he's removed turn signals (sidestand?) etc? Are those easy to come by? I'd need that for inspection.

I have no problem jumping through hoops to get a bike on the road. I do want a bike that I can easily ride on streets though. I'm not looking for something that needs to go in my truck. I wanna get on it and do some woops on the way to work without hurting myself or getting stuck (fortunately, my boss doesn't mind if I'm a little late to work)
KTM came out with a factory street legal exc in 2007, so no turn signal's, horn, hi beam, keyed ignition ect... unless the owner added them.
KTM side stands are a known weak point, his probably broke. Stronger aftermarket stands are around $100+
I change my oil every few rides and my filters every other oil change. ( I use mine mostly for trails)
I've road mine on the streets a lot at some dual sport events and a little around town but never down I-5 into Seattle.
If you plan to ride the streets more I would look for a different bike, there's no cush hub and the oil capacity is small (hence the frequent changes.)
If your riding mostly dirt it will be a great bike, especially with the suspension work done. It has new plastic's but the stator and clutch covers show little wear in the pictures. I would also get the damper but opinions vary on that.

If I was riding 50/50 I think in that price range I would look for a DRZ-400, Little heavier but a motor like a tractor and proven low maintenance and reliability. I think I've seen some around 3 grand.

JA

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Old 12-20-2012, 09:47 AM   #32
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just in reply to your thread title, I wanted to mention that I raced a hare scramble early this month and after the race went to the guy parked next to me to see about borrowing his ramp. He was an older guy. I asked him how he had done, he said he won his class. I asked him what class he had won and he said the 66+ class, and his main competition in the class was a spring chicken, having JUST turned 66 and become eligible for the class. This guy was 74!!
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Old 12-20-2012, 10:20 AM   #33
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Quote:
Originally Posted by RED CAT View Post
Japanese whatever you do. Less problems and reliable. Maybe not as much performance but you arn't ready for that yet anyhow. That 350 would be a great bike for you.
Please...I'm friggin begging you...don't turn this into a Euro vs. Japan thread (besides, you're opinion is just that...an opinion, because my opinion would be that the Euro bikes are more reliable, not less)

Yes, the DR350 would be a great bike for the OP to buy
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Old 12-20-2012, 10:27 AM   #34
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Quote:
Originally Posted by levain View Post
Alright, something like this seems perfect in lots of ways, but I have some questions mostly related to this particular ad.
-oil changed after every ride? Huh? Does that need to happen? Can't imagine. I definitely don't have what it takes for such a high maintenance machine if that is the case. However, buying a bike from someone that anal would be ideal

-Does it not come from the factory with a sidestand?

-Is this really a street legal bike? I assume he's removed turn signals (sidestand?) etc? Are those easy to come by? I'd need that for inspection.

I have no problem jumping through hoops to get a bike on the road. I do want a bike that I can easily ride on streets though. I'm not looking for something that needs to go in my truck. I wanna get on it and do some woops on the way to work without hurting myself or getting stuck (fortunately, my boss doesn't mind if I'm a little late to work)
-You do not need to change the oil after every ride

-Looks like he has a plate, so it would appear that he at least did the work needed to get a street legal title for it...so therefore you should be able to take the title and old reg. and get it registered in RI without a problem. I can't comment on whether it still has the road legal equipment on it or not, but all that stuff is easily available if he doesn't still have it.

-It's has better transmission gearing as the DR350...and unless you're planning to pound out many thousands of street miles (based on your first post, you're not), I wouldn't worry about the lack of cush drive (7000 miles and counting on my TE450...half on pavement...no issues).

-That DR350 is still a great choice, and a great deal
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Old 12-20-2012, 11:04 AM   #35
what broke now
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"don't turn this into a Euro vs. Japan thread"

Here Here!

Either will break if not appropriately cared for. Either will serve you well if cared for.
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Old 12-20-2012, 05:56 PM   #36
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56 here - still loving all facets of ridin....when the arthritis permits! Used to have a KTMEXC450 plated - nice, but seemed alittle heavy. Riding a XR250L right now and looking to power it up some.

Also still riding a KDX220.....sweetest old-man trail bike made.....can lug it, or wheel it...good luck finding a white plate one tho.
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Old 12-20-2012, 07:49 PM   #37
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Im 49 and still ride and feel like im 15..yes-a dr350 would be cheaper than a drz400 -any one would be fine for ya- just see which one you look at is the better deal and go fer it!! I like my plated 03 DRZ400 E model- its low maintenance and reliable and fun ..but its all modded and done up- so now for xmas gift to myself [before apocalypse] im looking for an under 2K dirtbike for something to do for a winter project...good luck with your new bike btw..

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Old 12-20-2012, 08:41 PM   #38
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I'm 57 and bought this one for $1500 this past summer, I ride it in the local woods weekly and in August went for a loop that included Baja, Sturgis and back home, just a bit over 5000 miles.

I've owned several brands and types of bikes and have done some pretty fair trips on a few of them, none were more fun than the 14 year old xr400 and I'm going to do another on it next fall.

Get a bike have fun with it, heck it's been 34 years since I rode a track bike but I bought a tt500 this past year, put my old plates on it and I'm going to run it a few days this next season. Enjoy whatever you end up buying, if it's been taken care of they are pretty trouble free. denny

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Old 12-21-2012, 01:39 AM   #39
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Taurkon View Post
KTM 200 EXC
Umm, no. Do not for one second think that this is a beginner's bike, just because it is low-ccs. It's a race weapon: it's tall, it has razor sharp steering, it needs to be kept on the boil, and it will spit you off in an instant if you let it.

I would also question the wisdom of a 450+ EXC or WR-F or CRF-X or whatever. They are serious weapons. The likes of the 200-400 old skool four strokes are fantastic mellow learning machines. Modern big-bore race weapons are not, and tend to reward ham-fisted operation with pain and suffering, as well as being harder to learn on. The big-bores might be a mellow ride for an experienced dirt rider, but they are simply too much bike for a novice. I've known several top-level road riders/racers that got on to those bikes as a learner, and regretted it. All admitted it was a mistake, that they should've started with something less.

And btw EXCs have always been street-legal ex-factory for most of the world. I understand some states of the union won't let you change the status of a bike, but for those that do it shouldn't be a big deal to get the bits to register any EXC.
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Old 12-21-2012, 06:30 AM   #40
bobnoxious67
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Originally Posted by warewolf View Post

I would also question the wisdom of a 450+ EXC or WR-F or CRF-X or whatever. They are serious weapons. The likes of the 200-400 old skool four strokes are fantastic mellow learning machines. Modern big-bore race weapons are not, and tend to reward ham-fisted operation with pain and suffering, as well as being harder to learn on. The big-bores might be a mellow ride for an experienced dirt rider, but they are simply too much bike for a novice. I've known several top-level road riders/racers that got on to those bikes as a learner, and regretted it. All admitted it was a mistake, that they should've started with something less.
I don't agree, and the people in my riding circle who have gone this way have not had the experiences you speak of. While they are capable of "racing", they're not going to spit you off and break you the minute you breath in the general direction of the throttle...on the contrary, the better brakes/suspension/weight/power help you.

Just another humble opinion.

I still say grab that DR350 quick...but if it's gone, either a DRZ400 or a KTM 400 EXC will treat you right
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Old 12-21-2012, 06:44 AM   #41
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Quote:
Originally Posted by warewolf View Post
Umm, no. Do not for one second think that this is a beginner's bike, just because it is low-ccs. It's a race weapon: it's tall, it has razor sharp steering, it needs to be kept on the boil, and it will spit you off in an instant if you let it.

.
My son rides a KTM 200 XC. We've had a lot of motorcycles and we find the 200 smoker is a very forgiveable motorcycle. Plus it makes plenty of grunt the way it is tuned. It's nothing like a 125 SX for example. Doesn't even need regular top ends. We had a couple KDX 200's too, which I think is also a sweet beginner bike, but not as sweet as the KTM. On the other hand, something less expensive and streetable is probably more in order. I vote the DR350 too...or maybe a DRZ400.
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Old 12-21-2012, 06:50 AM   #42
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Thanks everybody. Im enjoying the dabate and learning a lot from it.

That dr350 is gone, but its something to put on my radar.

Keep it coming!
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Old 12-21-2012, 12:27 PM   #43
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It probably depends on your riding terrain. Where I ride is mainly steep and technical and often slippery, and the more forgiving the bike the better.

The 200 is mellow and torquey anywhere on the flat. As soon as you point it up hill, it becomes a battle for just enough power but not too much. It just doesn't have the grunt unless it's in or close to band. It will wheelie in 6th gear at 100km/h just by snapping the throttle open. They are also prone to headshake above about 80km/h, although this can be minimised with suspension tuning. The KDX is a better choice because the chassis is plush, comparatively lazy and overall they just aren't so frenetic.

When I bought my 200EXC, it was like I had to learn to ride all over again, which was great for improving my skills. Indeed, I've just got back on to it after a 4 year hiatus during which I've used the 640 as my enduro/trail bike, and guess what? I've got to learn to ride the 200 again!! Whereas I can jump on anyone's strange-to-me 4T of any era and conquer challenging sections. Lots of magazine testers say it is an expert-level bike and too involving for them to really enjoy in casual use. I very much agree.

I'm not saying the 4T EXCs will spit you off if you touch the throttle. Quite the contrary, the diesel tractors take a lot of throttle to get stuff to happen, in comparison to the 2T. But... the big-bore bikes make arm-wrenching power, and fight for traction everywhere, and you have to fight them to keep them pointed in the right direction. You just get beaten up by them. At, or before, the end of the day you are knackered. Whereas a 250F you can ride hard all day, and you are in control of the bike, not the other way around - same goes for the old's cool trailies.

The OP wanted a cheap light bike to learn on, to smash and bash until he's up to something better. Something less than the top open-class race bike is probably a good idea, eh? Would you send a learner street rider out on an R1? And yes, it is the same thing.

They are great bikes and I love them, yes light weight and great suspension helps, and yes they might do the job, but I think there are much better choices for the OP.
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Old 12-21-2012, 01:22 PM   #44
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Quote:
Originally Posted by warewolf View Post
Umm, no. Do not for one second think that this is a beginner's bike, just because it is low-ccs. It's a race weapon: it's tall, it has razor sharp steering, it needs to be kept on the boil, and it will spit you off in an instant if you let it.

I would also question the wisdom of a 450+ EXC or WR-F or CRF-X or whatever. They are serious weapons. The likes of the 200-400 old skool four strokes are fantastic mellow learning machines. Modern big-bore race weapons are not, and tend to reward ham-fisted operation with pain and suffering, as well as being harder to learn on. The big-bores might be a mellow ride for an experienced dirt rider, but they are simply too much bike for a novice. I've known several top-level road riders/racers that got on to those bikes as a learner, and regretted it. All admitted it was a mistake, that they should've started with something less.

And btw EXCs have always been street-legal ex-factory for most of the world. I understand some states of the union won't let you change the status of a bike, but for those that do it shouldn't be a big deal to get the bits to register any EXC.
Interesting, but I do question if this opinion is based on experience. My wife had ZERO dirt experience, and about 3 years or 30,000km of experience riding an adventure bike. Her first dirt bike was (is) a 2006 KTM 200 XC that she bought when she was 41 and it has been a fantastic bike for her. She rarely rides on the pipe, but the bike is super light, and the hit on the pipe is not so much that it scares her to death.

I will stand by my original post that a light, nimble, easy to maintain bike will be more enjoyable, result in less injuries, and will allow a rider to increase their skill much more quickly than a heavier, less capable bike. Two years ago, my father started riding dirt bikes (on occasion), with no past motorcycle experience at all. He was 70 at the time and started riding my wife's 200 XC. It's been all good!!!

There is no question that a DR350 or an XT250 would be a decent bike depending on the terrain, but they are much less capable generally. I feel that new riders, especially if they are getting on in years, should cut their teeth on moderate single track. Speeds are lower and get-offs typically result in zero to less consequential injuries. Light bikes will tire out the rider less, and are much easier to pick up the 5th or 10th time and are guaranteed to be more fun in the long run.
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Old 12-21-2012, 03:43 PM   #45
what broke now
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"Umm, no. Do not for one second think that this is a beginner's bike, just because it is low-ccs."

I have to agree, but if it ends up suitable for one's riding style and terrain, what a buzz!! There is an active market for them and they can be readily traded if too hot. I am in the middle of trying to set up a 2003, and at 62 yrs old, it is a bit of a handful on technical singletrack, and in open country it will peel your eyeballs back in a hurry. [kudos to your wife,Taurkon, did she grow up as a rodeo rider?, just kiddin...]

I will admit I have spent some time and money on throttle cam, jets, flywheel weight, etc to calm it, but that just means i want it to work for me, it's a gas.
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