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Old 12-04-2012, 05:36 PM   #16
rambozo
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The grooves on the underside act as a locking mechanism, similar to the
grooved type washer(as opposed to a spring washer) only not as aggressive

If ireland could be arsed with a space program I'd say we would use pencils,
not much drink in space but so I doubt we'll bother
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Old 12-04-2012, 05:43 PM   #17
squish
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When I lived in Seattle in the 90's we'd switch out regular nuts and bolts, especially engine sidecover bolt for stainless
It never seemed to give any of my group of riding buddies and problem. Granted these hardware peices were put on and taken off often.

Now in SoCal when wrenching on some of those same bikes or other bikes where a like switch had been made
There's a noticable increase in galling of threads, pulled threads, and steel hardware rusting very quickly.

Of course you find a mix of fasteners on boats, I've seen the same thing, I've also seen them cause just as many problems.

As for the thin washer. That's not a normal washer, that's a wave washer. Its like a little spring it's a type of locking device that keeps the nut on the stud.

The hardware that comes stock on our bikes is not just random picked out of a box nut or bolt.
There is a reason or a method to the germans madness.
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Old 12-04-2012, 06:00 PM   #18
supershaft
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Originally Posted by rambozo View Post
In my climate if it's good enough for boats it's good enough for me

Sorry to disagree supershaft, I like your posts because you seem to ride similar to me, I
rev till the engine says no, not the counter, but one thing I don't like is rust, plenty of
grease and good quality stainless is hard to beat. Paint is okay until you put a spanner to it

Good proper rated stainless is dear but if you live in a place where it rains almost constantly
and the roads are salted in the winter it's worth it

Thanks rambozo. IMO the stock cadnium plated fasteners can't be beat. I run into problems with stainless on a regular basis. Stainless on stainless is the worst! I live in San Francisco and I still wouldn't have stainless on my bike. I have lived where they salt the roads too and I wouldn't have it there either but that's just me.
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Old 12-04-2012, 07:17 PM   #19
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I've been running with those exact SS nuts on my r100 for two years now with none of the bad side effects folks are concerned about. If your using a torque wrench for these you may be OCD.
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Old 12-05-2012, 01:24 AM   #20
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BMW have not used cadmium since the early 80s, because cadmium is a pretty shitty substance to clean up and it's not so good for the long term health of the people doing the plating. The plating place i used to use would do some under the counter cadnium plating in the 90s, but no longer. I think that BMW use zinc plating nowadays, but it will look very tired over a single winter unless the owner is really anal about rinsing the bike After every ride and spraying with ACF.

+1 squish on the wave washer
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Old 12-05-2012, 07:47 AM   #21
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BMW have not used cadmium since the early 80s, because cadmium is a pretty shitty substance to clean up and it's not so good for the long term health of the people doing the plating. The plating place i used to use would do some under the counter cadnium plating in the 90s, but no longer. I think that BMW use zinc plating nowadays, but it will look very tired over a single winter unless the owner is really anal about rinsing the bike After every ride and spraying with ACF.

+1 squish on the wave washer
Yes, looks like they changed the plating specs for "environmental concerns" sometime in the 90's.I looked into that but could not get a definite date for the change. So the newer stuff is not as good. Lots of salt on my 85 K-bike, never really had many corroding fasteners. On this 2003....plenty but all replaced now with correctly installed SS or for the larger bolts such as wheels/engine covers, soon to have their heads powdercoated.

Salt here.....a way of life they even salt the gravel roads in the summer for dust abatement. Salt-Away....great product.
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Old 12-05-2012, 10:04 AM   #22
supershaft
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Quote:
Originally Posted by chasbmw View Post
BMW have not used cadmium since the early 80s, because cadmium is a pretty shitty substance to clean up and it's not so good for the long term health of the people doing the plating. The plating place i used to use would do some under the counter cadnium plating in the 90s, but no longer. I think that BMW use zinc plating nowadays, but it will look very tired over a single winter unless the owner is really anal about rinsing the bike After every ride and spraying with ACF.

+1 squish on the wave washer
All airheads came with almost all the fasteners cadnium plated. Nowadays? They have just started offering within the last few years zinc plated fasteners versus cadnium. I would guess it first started about ten years ago? MANY (most by far) fasteners I get from BMWNA are still cadnium plated.
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Old 12-07-2012, 02:48 AM   #23
Paul_Rochdale
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I'm rebuilding an R100GS-PD and I shall fit stainless everywhere. Fit and forget. We have no problems replacing grotty steel fasteners with stainless on this side of the pond. Everybody does it with no problems. Stop needlessly worrying about stuff and enjoy the bike.
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Old 12-07-2012, 10:18 AM   #24
supershaft
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Needlessly worrying? I work on these bikes for a living. I am not worrying about it at all. I am talking about what I have to fix all the time. Stainless fasteners are WAY more likely to cause trouble. I have seen this born out time after time after time.
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Old 12-07-2012, 10:56 AM   #25
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Originally Posted by supershaft View Post
Needlessly worrying? I work on these bikes for a living. I am not worrying about it at all. I am talking about what I have to fix all the time. Stainless fasteners are WAY more likely to cause trouble. I have seen this born out time after time after time.
+1

Take a look at new BMW's front fenders, bolted to the fork with stainless junk....
If you try to take out the bolts after a few months they snap or the head is F*^%$#@.......

Than you have to tell the customer that bolts have snapped on his fairly new bike.!!! Happens all the time...
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Old 12-07-2012, 11:45 AM   #26
Rob Farmer
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You'd be hard pushed to find any Brits and Irish bikers who don't fit stainless as a matter of course when they replace nuts, bolts, washers, exhausts and even wheel rims and spokes. Our weather plays hell with the finish of bikes.
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Old 12-07-2012, 12:27 PM   #27
Paul_Rochdale
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...so there
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Old 12-07-2012, 12:38 PM   #28
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Lets take my R80St, it came from the coast so was pretty rust ridden when I bought it, it has since lived out on the street, summer and winter, from that day, with wind driven salt blown over the whole bike, but that is how it is over here.
I have changed most visible nuts, bolts, and screws to stainless, and I have never had a reaction caused by this. Actually that is a lie, I have had a reaction, the fittings are easier to use now, one thing though, I learned a long time ago working on Japanese engines, every thread I do up, is always smeared with some copper grease, only the finest smear, but it helps keep things moving.

The very first nuts I changed out to stainless on my ST, were the ones on the rocker covers, when I put on the peanut covers. They have been there ever since.
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Old 12-07-2012, 02:11 PM   #29
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Salty wind

I know the bikes from the UK have problems with salty air.
Lots of UK bikes have been exported to Holland a few years ago.
When customers came to a bike shop I worked at the time I only needed to lift the seat to see it was a bike from the UK.
Rust all over the place......

Can imagine you don't want the rusted bolts on the bike. But when you have to do maintenance on lots of those bikes all the time you will start to hate the stainless bolts.

I have a few on my bike.But not in places that might need to come off for repair's or maintenance.Or need to be a certain strength like the subframe bolts...
The stainless bolts are SO SOFT that when tightened a few times the heads are out of shape.(even when using good tools)

I Used my R80 for more than 400,000 km all year round lots of km's in snow and salt. But I have no rusting original bolts because of a regular spray of WD40.

A layer of fat(grease) doesn't matter as long as it's not on your wife
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Old 12-07-2012, 02:35 PM   #30
Rob Farmer
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WD40. Not a chance mate.It's fine for what it was designed for, displacing water, but no good as for protecting against serious corrosion but if you want to protect your bike properly the only thing that's ever worked for me is ACF50

wanna see some real corrosion?

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