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Old 12-08-2012, 08:54 PM   #16
darmahman
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How bout an R80ST?
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Old 12-09-2012, 01:41 AM   #17
Paul_Rochdale
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"reducing width is as important as thickness"

Very true. On my Pan my legs are almost at 45 degrees. If I had narrowed the nose of the seat as well as lowering it (which I did) both feet would lie flat on the ground. She's still at 650 lb a bit of a monster though.
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Old 12-09-2012, 05:57 AM   #18
kanakaka
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Interesting topic. I'm down here in central Florida and my mid-70ish parents just moved down to build right next to us. I'm really looking forward to hanging out with Dad during his "golden" years. He's alway had transportation motorcycles, especially during the 70's... Honda CB's Yamaha DT's, Puch twingle and so on. My mom even sported a Honda Trail 90 for a while. All practical commuters with milk crates strapped to the back for groceries. Well, it's been about 20 years since he's been on a bike but he's hunting for something that he can use to go riding with me and at the moment has settled on trying to find an R75/6. In my opinion, a good low center of gravity mellow motor choice for a road bike and a commuter. I've got an R90/6 and am really looking forward to doing a few memorable trips with him.

Cheers,
Claude
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Old 12-09-2012, 06:49 AM   #19
jackd
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I'm entering my late '50s now and hoping to ride my R100GS for the next few decades. I've tried sitting on my friend's DL1000 to see what a modern design offers in the way of comfort and realized that my old faithful GS is much more suitable to my needs. A smaller package all around. My friend (a non-Airhead guy) tried mine and was impressed by the much more compact feel to my bike. So the GS and I are going to ride into the sunset together - here's hoping for another 20 years in the saddle.
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Old 12-09-2012, 06:57 AM   #20
caponerd
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Location: Halfway between Munich and Redditch.
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I'm another one; just turned 63, and my stable includes (newest to oldest) a 2002 Aprilia Caponord, a 1989 Honda NX650 (my son's bike, but may become mine, since he recently moved to Chicago and got engaged) a 1982 R100RT, a 1970 BSA 441 Shooting Star, a 1966 Royal Enfield Interceptor, a 1965 R69S and a 1958 R-E Indian Tomahawk.

The Caponord is a wonderful bike, handles fantastically, more power than I have a right to possess, decent fuel economy, and all-day comfortable.
The problem with it is that it's not much fun anymore on dirt roads, and it's becoming a bit of a handful pushing around the garage and parking lots.

Someday, I may have to give up on the kickstart bikes, although so far, my legs are still up to the job, and it's possible that the BSA 441 is the only one which is likely to give me problems any time soon.

To be honest, if I had to pick one, I'd take the R69S. It's lighter than the R100, very easy to push around, and pull onto the center stand. It's also easier to ride on dirt roads than any of the others, in spite of limited ground clearance. The kickstart is easier to manage than the ones on my Britbikes; I stand to the side of the bike and kick it with my right leg, and it rarely requires more than a couple of kicks to get it running.
If my legs deteriorate to the point where even that kickstart becomes a problem, I suspect I'd have to switch to 3 wheels. Probably look around for a Ural outfit.
The Enfields will become museum pieces and heirlooms. I've owned them longer than any other bikes, and just couldn't see giving them up while I'm still alive.
So far, I don't feel any need to make a choice like that though. Still in good shape, and I work out regularly. We'll see what the future brings.
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Old 12-09-2012, 07:00 AM   #21
jackd
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The kick-starting thing was one of the reasons that I got rid of the Triumph T100C - it was a bugger when she got hot. Electric start is a great leg saver.
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Old 12-09-2012, 08:55 AM   #22
acap650
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Airhead vs DR650SE

I'm 65 with no major physical limitations other than a 29 in inseam and a bit of arthritus in both thumbs. I have 3 bikes that I can ride, R80ST, W650 and DR650SE. My choice for most all rides, both local and LD is the DR. It is set up for mostly road riding, 16T front sprocket (+1), low Sargent seat, small and larger windshields, lowered with suspension upgrades at both ends and a 19 in. front wheel.

While I admit to a desire for a new F700GS for the longer rides, the DR has served me well both on and off road. This past year we did 5K miles PA to CO and back. The occasional slab sections were do-able for 100 miles at a time but on small paved and unpaved roads it was all I could ask for.

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Old 12-09-2012, 09:14 AM   #23
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Thanks for all the thoughtful replies. It's interesting to me to see how others approach the question and to see the possibilities they offer. Keep 'em coming.
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Old 12-09-2012, 09:50 AM   #24
DaveBall
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I am 8 months away from 60. Due to arthritis in shoulders and upper back, I am thinking of getting off my R100RT for something with a more relaxed riding position. I still want the weight down low, so have been trying out some cruisers, including the R1200C. I am used to lower powered bikes, in comparison to the newer monsters out there. I don't need more than 70HP and learned long ago how to pack lightly for any trips. I like the lower seat height of the cruisers as well as they tend to have their centre of gravity fairly low.

I am not and never was into the "pirate" thing, but I think the current available cruiser styled bikes are a pretty good option for those of us that can't handle the higher bikes due to health issues.
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Old 12-09-2012, 10:02 AM   #25
DoktorT
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I am 62 and around 130 lbs. I have a 79 RS. It is getting just a bit too heavy. If I drop it in the parking lot, I have to remove the gear to pick it up. I do think I will get it all detailed for the MOA ralley next summer in Salem and put the for sale sign on it.

I will be getting something lighter. I went the the BCBeemers rally in Nakusp in August. Saw there again the ledgendary Phil Funnel. He is older and smaller than me. The year before I saw him with his R90/6 frankenbeemer. This year he had switched to the Yamaha V-star 250cc. Yup, with all his custom fiberglass and pulling his custom bullet trialer.

He says he doesn't need to run over 80 kilos anymore and he gets around 70mpg equivalent.

It's on my list as a possble replacement, along with many of the 2 clylinder vertical UJMs of the 70's and 80's. Stepping down a hundred pounds or more will keep me on the road with 2 wheels for another decade if I last that long.
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Old 12-09-2012, 10:07 AM   #26
jackd
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Quote:
Originally Posted by DaveBall View Post
I am 8 months away from 60. Due to arthritis in shoulders and upper back, I am thinking of getting off my R100RT for something with a more relaxed riding position. I still want the weight down low, so have been trying out some cruisers, including the R1200C. I am used to lower powered bikes, in comparison to the newer monsters out there. I don't need more than 70HP and learned long ago how to pack lightly for any trips. I like the lower seat height of the cruisers as well as they tend to have their centre of gravity fairly low.

I am not and never was into the "pirate" thing, but I think the current available cruiser styled bikes are a pretty good option for those of us that can't handle the higher bikes due to health issues.
I have lower back issues. The cruiser style would put more pressure on this area - the upright position on the GS is excellent. I would have thought that the R100RT would be ideal for your upper back issues. The additional benefit of the GS is that I can move around on the seat if discomfort arises - I wouldn't think that you could do that on a cruiser.
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Old 12-09-2012, 10:32 AM   #27
Penderic
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I am retired now. I too rode an ST1100 for many years, till the weight started to get to me. And when I moved to an rural - urban location I found my riding needs changed a lot.

I just don't feel like going on fast long distance rides on crowded highways anymore. If I had liked to go to distant events and mingle with like minded riders, I see the logic of still keeping a big rig.

Very hilly, curvy roads and slow speeds take up most of my time now. Thick forests and lots of deer, tourists on bicycles, and a large retired population - keep my high speed events way down.

I sold the ST1100. I thought a restored classic might be fun, there are a couple of shiny antique Indians around here, but they require a lot of protection, care and expense that I didn't want to take on - but I did want to have a ride that was fun.

I looked at some light weight bikes and scooters. Drawn to the Retro Truimphs, Guzzis, Royal Enfield, Kawis...... I did some more researching and thinking and....


Lightweight, lovely sound and a nice engine response .... my V7Classic is unique, gets a lot of attention and with a few comfort add-ons, it is fine for the occasional long trip.
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Old 12-09-2012, 10:43 AM   #28
Thickasabrick
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Great Thread

Just turned 60 and have been thinking lighter bike for the last couple years. Have had a K1200GT for some years and loved it, but the weight when not rolling sucks. I have an R75/6 and will probably get an R90/100 sometime in the future for trailer towing (Anyone want to trade your R100RT for my K bike). Really like the luggage options on Airheads, and so far the availability of parts. Having said all that, and after reading the above comments, a single is looking better and better.

Great thread....
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Old 12-09-2012, 11:35 AM   #29
Velocipede
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[QUOTE=_cy_;20208394]work with your seat profile. reducing width is as important as thickness. I've got 30in inseams and sit almost flat foot on G/S with suspension at stock height.

Yup,been there done that,so often in fact that I get Xmas cards from the local upholsterer.My legs could be described as stocky which I'm sure is part of the problem.

I could buy a Harley and plant my feet firmly but but but.......

John
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Old 12-09-2012, 02:26 PM   #30
jackd
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Actually I'm starting to enjoy the complaints of my similarly aged fellow workers that own Harleys - they're finding them too unwieldly to handle anymore. I've always tormented them, that they were that way all along. They hate to admit that my GS is just the right size.
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