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Old 12-21-2012, 11:12 AM   #46
Horsehockey
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Vespa. Can't wait.
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Old 12-21-2012, 06:08 PM   #47
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Originally Posted by Horsehockey View Post
Vespa. Can't wait.
Is that going to be a Vespa with a side car? Or training wheels?
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Old 12-21-2012, 06:35 PM   #48
Horsehockey
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I can't afford the optional sidecar. I'm thinking that once the Vespa gets hard for me to "hold up", I'll see if I can find some slightly used training wheels (Schwinn preferred) and do a nice retrofit installation. SS hardware from Ace, of course.
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Old 12-22-2012, 11:05 AM   #49
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But the real question here is what kind of oil are you going to run?
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Old 12-22-2012, 11:27 AM   #50
Horsehockey
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http://cdn.coupondad.net/wp-content/...3-in-1-oil.gif
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Old 12-22-2012, 12:44 PM   #51
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Heck, I fit right into the oldsters gang at 61 :-) true enough, I did sell my Dyna because it was too heavy to easily move around the shop and into the driveway. What a lump! I've already listed a nice light 64 Triumph in the flea market, kickstarting has gotten harder with my bum knee. Next to go will be the America, at 550 or so it's borderline too heavy but the low seat makes it easy to flat foot. I find the R75/5 to be just perfectly weighted for me. It's a keeper.

Lots of nice Vespas out there too. And then there's the whole Burgman thing...
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Old 12-22-2012, 04:12 PM   #52
Bill Harris
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Horsehockey View Post
I can't afford the optional sidecar. I'm thinking that once the Vespa gets hard for me to "hold up", I'll see if I can find some slightly used training wheels (Schwinn preferred) and do a nice retrofit installation. SS hardware from Ace, of course.
Horsehockey--

Horsepucky.

--Bill


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Old 12-22-2012, 05:07 PM   #53
ME 109
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How about techniques used to make riding big bikes easier.

One thing I do when dismounting is to use the front brake. It makes the bike much easier to handle, especially when loaded for touring.
Deploying stands would probably be the biggest issue faced by us as we grow older and less confident.
What other tips/techniques are out there?
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Old 12-22-2012, 05:39 PM   #54
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ME 109 View Post
How about techniques used to make riding big bikes easier.

One thing I do when dismounting is to use the front brake. It makes the bike much easier to handle, especially when loaded for touring.
Deploying stands would probably be the biggest issue faced by us as we grow older and less confident.
What other tips/techniques are out there?
I just noticed this thread today and find it quite timely as I just turned 61 last week and starting just after my 60th last year my body arbitrarily quit doing certain tasks the way it used to. I can't wait to see what i can't do any more by the end of this February....

Seriously, 60 and now 61 aren't mental milestones. I'm as childish as ever. But physically I noticed little things suddenly pop up like not being able to throw my leg over the F 650 it it has the top box or luggage/camping gear loaded on it. (It does have higher ride and seat height due to an Ohlins 650 GS rear shock and a Corbin seat a little taller than stock).

The tip I can share on this one is that depending on how the bike is loaded, many times I can mount from the right side by stepping onto the right peg and simultaneously placing my upper body weight on the bars and holding the front brake for safety. By stepping up and leaning over the bike to prevent pulling it toward myself and off the side stand, I can swing my left leg over the seat from a much greater and more comfortable height. Usually.

But like everybody on this thread, I've started looking ahead. My family history says I have a better than even shot at riding for another 20 years if I slow down on some of my vices. But as much as I like thge older bikes like my F 650 and R80 ST, I'm growing tired of the maintenance chores. And the F 650 gets more top heavy with each passing year.

More and more often I find myself thinking about changing my habit of keeping a good bike forever and selling off what I have and buying one dependable modern bike like a Wee Strom or Versys. Or if I get more feeble, someting lighter like a DRZ 400 or DR 350.

The problem with that line of thought is that the Wee Strom jumps to the head of the list because my off road excursions are getting less challenging, but I still like to go past the end of the pavement. BUT, more and more of my riding is travelling to get to rallies and events. The F 650 still shines for that mix, but is getting old and is seriously top heavy for an old guy.

But I'm glad someone brought this topic up.
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Old 12-23-2012, 01:30 PM   #55
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Quote:
Originally Posted by mark1305
The tip I can share on this one is that depending on how the bike is loaded, many times I can mount from the right side by stepping onto the right peg and simultaneously placing my upper body weight on the bars and holding the front brake for safety. By stepping up and leaning over the bike to prevent pulling it toward myself and off the side stand, I can swing my left leg over the seat from a much greater and more comfortable height.
I started finding it easier to put the bike on the sidestand, step up on the left footpeg with my left foot, swing my right leg over and put my right foot on the ground, and take it off the sidestand. Used to be able to mount with the bike off the sdiestand, while standing on the ground, but have gotten less flexible.

One adapts...

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Old 12-23-2012, 05:09 PM   #56
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Yep, I've tried it from the left side too. Sometimes it works as well. But if the bike is loaded for a camping trip with tools, spares, etc. it starts out with a pretty good lean angle on the sidestand because the rear shock is for a 650 GS and a little longer. But it was sprung for me + riding gear + plus average load of 35-40 lbs of "stuff". So when I add my weight to all the gear which isn't quite enough to compress the rear much, it suddenly settles to the appropriate sag/ride height.

So in my case I found it more dependable to try that mount from the right side most of the time since its easy to lean over the bike than trying not to.

Unloaded totally the left side is more doable.

Wish I had something like a Reynolds Ride-Off center stand. That would be the ticket.
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Old 12-23-2012, 06:05 PM   #57
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I'll keep that trick in mind.

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Old 12-23-2012, 08:07 PM   #58
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Originally Posted by type918 View Post
Maybe I should be posting in this on Dr. Phil's website but I don't think he'd get it.

Here's the deal. I spend a lot of time looking at this Airheads site (current ride is a less-than-pristine R90/6, 8,500 miles this year) and lately a lot of time with Thumpers. 65 years old and counting, reasonable condition for what I've seen. Been riding since 1965. Past rides in order: Harley (Aermacchi) Sprint, BSA 441 Victor, 883 Sportster, Yamaha DT-1, Velocette Thruxton, Yamaha YDS-3 and RD400, FrankenBSA 441 (slow learner, I guess), Suzuki SV650S (torturous even with modifications).

The people here seem to be a thoughtful lot so this is the question: When you look into the future, do you see yourself looking at lighter, easier-to-handle bikes? I'm currently obsessed with Suzuki's DR650SE, 100 lbs. lighter than my R90 and, from what I read, very capable. Also, about as simple as an airhead, which in my book is a definite plus. Seems like a lot of airheads get put away by owners who can no longer ride them and then they deteriorate (rider and machine). I hope to keep riding for many more years.

How do you see it?
They say you are only as old as you feel. You must be feeling old.
I, too, spent the last 35 years riding the R90 that I bought new.
I just recently bought and even heavier bike, a 76 Goldwing with
fairing, bags, rack, etc. Gotta be at least 700 pounds.
I love it! My driver's license says I'm 63 but it lies. I'm really only 29.
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Old 12-23-2012, 08:22 PM   #59
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Originally Posted by Offcenter View Post
They say you are only as old as you feel. You must be feeling old.
I, too, spent the last 35 years riding the R90 that I bought new.
I just recently bought and even heavier bike, a 76 Goldwing with
fairing, bags, rack, etc. Gotta be at least 700 pounds.
I love it! My driver's license says I'm 63 but it lies. I'm really only 29.
I've got a 79 year old neighbour who rides a decked out Goldwing. He doesn't ride it a lot but does an annual trip with his brother down into the PNW. He is starting to feel his age of late, and he looks at my GS fondly. In his case the heart is willing but the body is starting to fail. I hope I'm doing what he's doing at that age.
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