ADVrider

Go Back   ADVrider > Bikes > GSpot > GS Boxers
User Name
Password
Register Inmates Photos Site Rules Search Today's Posts Mark Forums Read

Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread Display Modes
Old 12-04-2012, 01:10 AM   #1
motorbikeman OP
Adventurer
 
Joined: Jun 2012
Oddometer: 16
My GSA handles weird lately

I bought a brand new GSA some months ago and I loved how it handled. It felt light and very flickable.

However, for the last one month or so the handle has become extremely heavy and the bike refuses to corner. Once I manage to turn it in it just wants to keep turning in. I have checked tyre pressure a few times and its always 2.1 - 2.2 bar in the front and 2.5 - 2.6 bar at the rear. I have also tried the suspension settings and nothing works. It just wont feel like it was.

I haven't crashed it or done any heavy off road riding yet. There was a puncture in the front tyre which was repaired and there seems to be no leak.

The handling is so bad I dont even feel like riding it anymore. Its done 9000kms and I'm waiting for another 1000kms before I drop it in for a service. Meanwhile, anyone else experienced this same issue?
motorbikeman is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-04-2012, 03:43 AM   #2
viz
I Ride Ms Piggy
 
viz's Avatar
 
Joined: Nov 2006
Location: Sydney, Oz
Oddometer: 1,809
Put it on its main stand and check the steering lock to lock with the front wheel off the ground. It should be light and smooth with no notching, free with no resistance; you should not be able to feel the steering head bearings and it should have no free play forward and back, up and down. If it is tight and or notchy there is something wrong, probably with a bearing that maybe collapsed. Not that hard to fix...

viz
__________________
Pig In The City - 2010 BMW R1200 GSA Adventure
1996 XL1200S Sportster - a temporary insanity
Webmaster BMW Touring Club of NSW
viz is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-04-2012, 03:56 AM   #3
vagueout
Beastly Adventurer
 
vagueout's Avatar
 
Joined: Mar 2010
Location: sydney, east
Oddometer: 1,590
Those pressures you quote in "bar"s are at the absolute minimum of pressures for road use, the bike would feel sluggish to turn. I'd urge you to go and pump the tyre front--38 psi and rear-- 42 psi at COLD pressures. I'm confident you will find your bike much more agile. May also be worth playing with you rear pre-load setting.
__________________
i just seek clarity
vagueout is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-04-2012, 03:59 AM   #4
vagueout
Beastly Adventurer
 
vagueout's Avatar
 
Joined: Mar 2010
Location: sydney, east
Oddometer: 1,590
Quote:
Originally Posted by viz View Post
Put it on its main stand and check the steering lock to lock with the front wheel off the ground. It should be light and smooth with no notching, free with no resistance; you should not be able to feel the steering head bearings and it should have no free play forward and back, up and down. If it is tight and or notchy there is something wrong, probably with a bearing that maybe collapsed. Not that hard to fix...

viz
Sorry to jump on your advice, but these have ball-joints instead of conventional steering head bearings, and i've yet to hear of one of these failing other than due to crash damage.
__________________
i just seek clarity
vagueout is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-04-2012, 04:19 AM   #5
tommyvdv
Gnarly Adventurer
 
tommyvdv's Avatar
 
Joined: Mar 2011
Location: Belgium
Oddometer: 410
Take a look at yr tires. Are they worn to a plateau?

tommyvdv is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-04-2012, 05:39 AM   #6
motorbikeman OP
Adventurer
 
Joined: Jun 2012
Oddometer: 16
Quote:
Originally Posted by vagueout View Post
Those pressures you quote in "bar"s are at the absolute minimum of pressures for road use, the bike would feel sluggish to turn. I'd urge you to go and pump the tyre front--38 psi and rear-- 42 psi at COLD pressures. I'm confident you will find your bike much more agile. May also be worth playing with you rear pre-load setting.
I didn't know that! I will certainly try the pressures you mentioned. Right now its 32 front and 36 rear. Thanks.
motorbikeman is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-04-2012, 05:40 AM   #7
motorbikeman OP
Adventurer
 
Joined: Jun 2012
Oddometer: 16
Quote:
Originally Posted by tommyvdv View Post
Take a look at yr tires. Are they worn to a plateau?

No the tyres are fine as of now!
motorbikeman is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-04-2012, 05:57 AM   #8
bobbybob
Studly Adventurer
 
Joined: Sep 2008
Location: Charlotte, NC
Oddometer: 557
What you describe is exactly the way tires feel as they wear. 5000 miles means they most likely have some "squaring off" which contributes to the feeling that it just wants to "fall on over" instead of holding the lean angle. It gives a "notchy" steering feel. It doesn't take much wear to cause a distinct loss of cornering feel.
bobbybob is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-04-2012, 07:19 AM   #9
lhendrik
Truffle Rustler
 
lhendrik's Avatar
 
Joined: Dec 2008
Location: New York and Floridoodie
Oddometer: 2,295
Yeah, the tires are worn and need air, so stop riding the bike :))

Motorcycling requires a bit more maintenance participation than you may be used to, especially on such a "mechanically advanced' bike as a GSA :) It would be a shame to walk away from a bike because of air and rubber.

I think you will benefit from a more hands on approach, especially when it comes to the next level of maintenance, like changing the oil or getting someone to do it for you. Even if you choose to pay for it, it would be good to get used to looking closely at things on this beast.

Good luck, and many years of happy riding to you.
__________________
Normal is just a setting on the dryer.
2009 R1200GS A, 2008 K1200GT
lhendrik is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-04-2012, 07:34 AM   #10
motorbikeman OP
Adventurer
 
Joined: Jun 2012
Oddometer: 16
Quote:
Originally Posted by lhendrik View Post
Yeah, the tires are worn and need air, so stop riding the bike :))

Motorcycling requires a bit more maintenance participation than you may be used to, especially on such a "mechanically advanced' bike as a GSA :) It would be a shame to walk away from a bike because of air and rubber.

I think you will benefit from a more hands on approach, especially when it comes to the next level of maintenance, like changing the oil or getting someone to do it for you. Even if you choose to pay for it, it would be good to get used to looking closely at things on this beast.

Good luck, and many years of happy riding to you.
My last bike was a Royal Enfield so I'm no stranger to hands on maintenance. I'm still learning about a highly advanced bike like the GSA and this for example is a good learning experience.
motorbikeman is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-04-2012, 08:07 AM   #11
Ayrshire Bull
why the hell not?
 
Ayrshire Bull's Avatar
 
Joined: Nov 2002
Location: The Left Coast, B.C., CA-NA-DA
Oddometer: 2,382
lots of great advice here....

I too would first look at dialing in the pressure - as per Vagueout's suggestion .....

then taking a really good look at tires (for flat spots or cupping) as per Tommy's suggestion

where do you live?
__________________
"It's not what you look at that matters, it's what you see." - HDT
Ayrshire Bull is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 12-04-2012, 08:24 AM   #12
motorbikeman OP
Adventurer
 
Joined: Jun 2012
Oddometer: 16
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ayrshire Bull View Post
lots of great advice here....

I too would first look at dialing in the pressure - as per Vagueout's suggestion .....

then taking a really good look at tires (for flat spots or cupping) as per Tommy's suggestion

where do you live?
I'm from Dubai. We do quite a bit of non stop high speed riding for many a kilometres here. I'm assuming if I've been riding at minimum tyre pressure since I got the bike then it must have damaged the tyres.
motorbikeman is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-04-2012, 08:30 AM   #13
Ayrshire Bull
why the hell not?
 
Ayrshire Bull's Avatar
 
Joined: Nov 2002
Location: The Left Coast, B.C., CA-NA-DA
Oddometer: 2,382
Quote:
Originally Posted by motorbikeman View Post
I'm from Dubai. We do quite a bit of non stop high speed riding for many a kilometres here. I'm assuming if I've been riding at minimum tyre pressure since I got the bike then it must have damaged the tyres.
I was wondering if you lived someplace with lots of twisty, windy roads ..... or someplace that might have long straight sections.

For the latter, I'd expect more 'squaring off' of the tires - the former might see more even wear across the entire tire, side to side.

Is it easy for you to post a picture of your tires - ?
__________________
"It's not what you look at that matters, it's what you see." - HDT
Ayrshire Bull is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 12-04-2012, 09:39 AM   #14
motorbikeman OP
Adventurer
 
Joined: Jun 2012
Oddometer: 16
Filled air. 38psi front and 42psi rear. The bike seems much more agile now. Great advise from ADV members as usual. My rear tyre seems to have squared off a bit though.

What I don't understand is how did the workshop guys filled 32psi front and 36psi rear right from the start and even after my first service!
motorbikeman is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-04-2012, 11:08 AM   #15
fastgpfred
Adventurer
 
Joined: Apr 2010
Location: Northern Calif
Oddometer: 42
It is what it is. Tire pressure is the first place to check if you loose precise steering
fastgpfred is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Share

Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

.
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is On

Forum Jump


Times are GMT -7.   It's 11:39 AM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.5
Copyright ©2000 - 2014, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
Copyright ADVrider 2011-2014