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Old 04-27-2015, 01:47 PM   #1
Ranger Ron OP
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Location: Sonoran Desert, AZ
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KLR - Tubeless on 17" Wheels

I installed front and rear GS500 wheels on my 2013 KLR.




The tires are Avon AM26 Roadriders. The front is a 120/70V17 and the rear is a 140/70-17. Those sizes fit well on the Suzuki wheels (3" front, 3 .5" rear).

The front disc is semi-floating 310mm.




I settled on a 41 tooth rear sprocket with the KLR 15 tooth oem front (I like the noise reduction). 15/41 is slightly lower than 16/43.




It was nice being able to jettison about 10 lbs of tubes, tire irons, bead breaker, etc.
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Old 04-27-2015, 03:57 PM   #2
LexLeroy
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Nice work. You may want to think about lowering links to get back some of the trail that you lost when you dropped the front axle and raised the rear.

I put SV1000 wheels on my DL1000. While it sharpened up the steering it became down right scary much over 70 mph, particularly in heavy winds. I ended up dropping the rear 3/4" to slow the steering down. YMMV.
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Old 04-27-2015, 04:20 PM   #3
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I've got 1 1/2" lowering links on the rear and had the forks slid up in the triple clamps the same amount. In doing the research I found that with the links in the rear and the forks dropped back to their original position I was within about 4 mm of the original geometry.

Sometimes there's an advantage to being short.
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Old 04-27-2015, 06:28 PM   #4
lamotovita
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I admire your ingenuity, but holy crap that's ugly.
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Old 04-28-2015, 06:05 AM   #5
LexLeroy
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Ranger Ron View Post
I've got 1 1/2" lowering links on the rear and had the forks slid up in the triple clamps the same amount. In doing the research I found that with the links in the rear and the forks dropped back to their original position I was within about 4 mm of the original geometry.

Sometimes there's an advantage to being short.
Most excellent. Tell us some more about the technical issues that you faced. Having done a couple of rear wheel swaps myself I know that it's seldom as easy as just bolting up some different parts and riding off into the sunset.
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Old 04-28-2015, 08:09 AM   #6
Ranger Ron OP
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Originally Posted by LexLeroy View Post
Most excellent. Tell us some more about the technical issues that you faced. Having done a couple of rear wheel swaps myself I know that it's seldom as easy as just bolting up some different parts and riding off into the sunset.
The rear was surprisingly easy. The axle size was the same and even the hub width (outside spacer to spacer) was the same! The only issue was with the disc. It was attached with Allen head bolts. The bolt heads hit the KLR caliper. Also, the disc diameter was about 4mm too large. I had a machine shop remove that. I also had them countersink the mounting holes and I replaced the bolts with flat hex head bolts.

The sprocket was very slightly offset to the outside. I would have preferred it to be in exact alignment, naturally. The sprocket had 39 teeth. I originally thought the ratio would be OK, but it turned out to be too high. I went to a 41 tooth sprocket. When it arrived, I realized that it was offset slightly. I mounted it "backwards" and then the sprocket alignment was perfect! I got lucky...

The front was a bit more fiddly. I had to have the Suzuki spacers shortened some. Fortunately, the axle diameters were the same. The KLR brake disc is 280mm, the Suzuki is 310. I took a gamble and bought an Eagle Mike caliper relocation bracket (designed for an after market 320mm disc). With a small modification it worked perfectly with the Suzuki disc.

The KLR speedo drive is completely different from the Suzuki and would not work. I had planned to use the Suzuki drive with a DR650 speedo cable. That didn't work, though. The KLR and Suzuki brake discs and speedo drives are opposite each other. I had to mount the wheel backwards because of the brake. That meant the speedo drive would be turning the wrong direction. Consequently, I don't have the use of the oem speedo or odometers. That wasn't an issue for me because I had already made an instrument module that contained those features (among others).

Here's the module. It has temperature, miles per hour, time, fuel level, gear indicator, and trip odometer. The trip odometer toggles from trip to range (distance to go with remaining gas), and main odometer.

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