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Old 12-16-2012, 07:59 PM   #16
JustKip
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Quote:
Originally Posted by brandonmccann View Post
I've looked at the ninja 250, actually what I originally had wanted. After looking around at what some people said about it's stability at highway speeds I was deterred from it. Also the fact that it might take a while to get up to 70mph.
Do yourself a favor and read this
http://www.advrider.com/forums/showthread.php?t=513116
it's a ride report about a 14 day Seattle, Washington to Halifax, Nova Scotia ride 3 friends of mine did. 2 were riding Ninja 250s and the other was on a WR250. Terry, the author, said the little Ninja had no problem sustaining 80 mph even uphill at high altitudes in Colorado...and

Have you heard about the new Ninja 300? Much more power, from lower RPMs to the same redline. Terry just ordered one, and I suggested a repeat performance, which I would gladly buy the little Ninja to do. Right now my only bike is R1200GS

For longer rides you'll appreciate the wind protection on the Ninja more than a naked bike, but I still think the Monster 696 would be a great option, with about a 1.5 inch lower seat than the Aprillia, 50 lbs less, and about the same power...after you get some riding experience

JustKip screwed with this post 12-16-2012 at 08:29 PM
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Old 12-16-2012, 08:30 PM   #17
CanadianX
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Check out this thread, also a great place to ask questions about what works.
http://www.advrider.com/forums/showthread.php?t=669666
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Old 12-17-2012, 04:18 AM   #18
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Originally Posted by brandonmccann View Post
My pants have an inseam of 32....


Your height has nothing to do with which bike you can comfortably manage, but your inseam does play a role. If what you said above is true, you shouldn't have a problem getting your feet on the ground with most bikes. I only have a 30" inseam and have owned various tall bikes, from single cylinder thumpers such as the DRZ and the KLR, to Adventure bikes like the Ulysses, Tigers, etc...

While not necessary, having your feet planted firmly on the ground at stops does help your confidence. When it's all said and done, getting miles under your belt will build your confidence more than anything, regardless of bike choice.
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Old 12-17-2012, 04:40 AM   #19
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Read: Old Man on a Bike, its a good read by Simon Gandolfi, an old man that actually rides a 125cc pizza bike to the end of the earth. The same sort of bike that most south of Texas ride everyday.
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Old 12-17-2012, 05:15 AM   #20
greer
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Lay a yardstick across the backs of a couple of kitchen chairs at a height of 32" to make yourself a stick bike. Does the seat look tall? Remember you'll have some straddle in your legs to accommodate the width of the bike; your legs can't shoot straight to the ground. Note kaintuck's comments on page 1 about managing the bike on uneven surfaces and so forth.

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Old 12-17-2012, 05:58 AM   #21
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Originally Posted by brandonmccann View Post
Well It's not the only transportation I'll have, but rather what I'd choose. My car gets half the gas mileage that the shiver would and gas doesn't run too cheap. If it's raining or the roads are slick or I need to carry stuff I can always take my car.

Would it be possible to lower it down to 30 inches by changing the shocks and the forks?
My wife's inseam is 26". She has owned 4 bikes and I have had to lower all of them, but I mod bikes so am comfortable doing this. Some are easier to lower than others. Every bike I have lowered compromised the overall suspension and handling to some extent.

I just took a look at the Shiver 750 and it can be lowered a couple of inches by adjustment/replacement of shock/spring and raising the forks an 1" or so maybe. You can also change tire specs and gain another 1/2" in some cases. They make low profile tires mostly for motards but the rubber is soft so do not last as long. On some ABS bikes the different tire size will cause a fault with the ABS.

My wife's 696 Monster was very easy to lower. A 1100 S shock with new spring for her lighter weight is adjustable enough to allow almost 2" lower.
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Old 12-17-2012, 06:10 AM   #22
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Quote:
Originally Posted by greer View Post
Lay a yardstick across the backs of a couple of kitchen chairs at a height of 32" to make yourself a stick bike. Does the seat look tall? Remember you'll have some straddle in your legs to accommodate the width of the bike; your legs can't shoot straight to the ground. Note kaintuck's comments on page 1 about managing the bike on uneven surfaces and so forth.

Sarah


The bike will also "sag" some under weight, which may or may not negate the length you will lose for the width of the bike.
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Old 12-17-2012, 06:16 AM   #23
kantuckid
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Originally Posted by Dirtysouth View Post
Your height has nothing to do with which bike you can comfortably manage, but your inseam does play a role. If what you said above is true, you shouldn't have a problem getting your feet on the ground with most bikes. I only have a 30" inseam and have owned various tall bikes, from single cylinder thumpers such as the DRZ and the KLR, to Adventure bikes like the Ulysses, Tigers, etc...

While not necessary, having your feet planted firmly on the ground at stops does help your confidence. When it's all said and done, getting miles under your belt will build your confidence more than anything, regardless of bike choice.
True! See the OP's inseam vs. mine as a great e.g.. He obviously has a "very short upper torso" whereas I have a tall torso but short legs. I have always privately felt that had I my brothers legs and my torso I might have made it in baseball a bit further...
When you get away from level surfaces it is quite easy to drop a hvy bike if you cannot plant either foot. It can also be easy to drop one(remember I'm an exp rider too) in a parking lot-I did it in a Wendy's after I put down a foot(didn't notice it as a dangerous spot) on a slick oil spot to hold my bike-cost me a windshield! That bike had a lowered seat to suit me. You cannot be too careful when stopped.
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Old 12-17-2012, 06:42 AM   #24
greer
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Originally Posted by Dirtysouth View Post
The bike will also "sag" some under weight, which may or may not negate the length you will lose for the width of the bike.

True, but I figure if it's a sport-type bike the suspension is apt to be fairly stiff. I hate to see new folks start out on tip-toes, it just seems to increase risk all the way around.

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Old 12-17-2012, 06:53 AM   #25
Dirtysouth
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Quote:
Originally Posted by greer View Post
I hate to see new folks start out on tip-toes, it just seems to increase risk all the way around.

Sarah


I agree with you 100%. I think people should be comfortable with a bike, especially when starting out. If the OP actually has a 32" inseam though, he/she shouldn't have a problem straddling most bikes. Now if it is the OP's first bike, I would recommend something a little less sporty than the Shiver with almost 100 hp. The HP/Torque of a twin is more than likely going to cause more issues than his/her inseam.


I like the idea of a single cylinder dualsport, or something along the lines of a Ninja 250 or the likes. Starting off with a bike with too much power will only exaggerate any problems or issues one may have.
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Old 12-17-2012, 07:57 AM   #26
Pecha72
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Originally Posted by llamapacker View Post
My wife's inseam is 26". She has owned 4 bikes and I have had to lower all of them, but I mod bikes so am comfortable doing this. Some are easier to lower than others. Every bike I have lowered compromised the overall suspension and handling to some extent.

I just took a look at the Shiver 750 and it can be lowered a couple of inches by adjustment/replacement of shock/spring and raising the forks an 1" or so maybe. You can also change tire specs and gain another 1/2" in some cases. They make low profile tires mostly for motards but the rubber is soft so do not last as long. On some ABS bikes the different tire size will cause a fault with the ABS.

My wife's 696 Monster was very easy to lower. A 1100 S shock with new spring for her lighter weight is adjustable enough to allow almost 2" lower.
Changing tyre profile enough to actually lower a bike may not be such a good idea afterall, or at least you should know very well what you're doing, otherwise is probably better to leave 'em alone.
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Old 12-17-2012, 11:45 AM   #27
kojack
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Im a short ass. i ride a versys and Its perfect.

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Old 12-17-2012, 12:28 PM   #28
High Country Herb
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I think I am in a similar situation, so hopefully I can offer something to the thread.

I have a 32" inseam, and ride the Aprilia Dorsoduro 750, which has a 34" seat height. (+2" all around to your situation) I can't flat foot it, and I wasn't happy about that before buying the bike, but got used to it very quickly. I can get a good portion of both feet on the ground at the same time, which is plenty when riding solo. When backing uphill, I prefer to get off and push from beside the bike. When my passenger gets on (together we weigh the same as the bike), I have to be careful that both feet are on good footing. In other words, no problem for you.

A little about the Aprilia 750: WARNING...if you go test ride the Shiver, you will be hooked. You won't look at the Ninja 250-300 the same ever again. Don't get me wrong, those are fun efficient commuter bikes, but the Aplilia 750 twin is addicting. Once under way, the 410-416 lbs disappears and you become one with the bike. Having 3 different drive-by-wire throttle maps allows you to adjust the twichyness of the throttle as you become used to the bike. Rain mode is great for learning, dirt, or rain. I use Tour mode 90% of the time, and its great. Racers like Sport mode, which only requires about 1/4 turn for full throttle.

Most of the Ape 750's have been pretty reliable. A few have some electrical relay problems and whatnot, but they are largely trouble free. I live 2 hour away from my dealer, and haven't been back in the year and a half since I bought it.
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Old 12-17-2012, 12:48 PM   #29
llamapacker
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Originally Posted by Pecha72 View Post
Changing tyre profile enough to actually lower a bike may not be such a good idea afterall, or at least you should know very well what you're doing, otherwise is probably better to leave 'em alone.
I was answering the OP question, can it be lowered. The choices are out there, but some of them may cause other problems, the ABS not working on the F650GS was one we had to deal with.

On the lower profile tire, the difference of the Monster 796 rear tire and the 696 is about 1/2" and also the 696 has a lower profile front tire. On the Monster most of the difference in seat height between models is tires and shock mount (796 and 1100) has a spacer at the top.

Soupy also makes an offset shock mount that lowers the Shiver 750 about 30mm using the OEM shock.

http://www.soupysperformance.com/cat...00/8560243.htm
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Old 12-17-2012, 03:09 PM   #30
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A 100hp bike as a starter bike. Not the smart choice,even with the best training.
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