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Old 12-17-2012, 04:11 PM   #31
tedder
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Quote:
Originally Posted by kantuckid View Post
A 100hp bike as a starter bike. Not the smart choice,even with the best training.
If you're gonna fuck up with 22hp, may as well have 100hp and get it out of the way earlier.

But I don't remember if brandonmccann said if he's taken MSF classes.
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Old 12-17-2012, 04:42 PM   #32
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You might look at the Suzuki Gladius, which is the next iteration after the SV650. Similar to the Shiver in look and style, has a 31" seat height, and you should be able to find a used one at a decent price (conventional wisdom is to buy used for your first bike). Stable, quick, nimble, fun....

Suggest you also look for a jacket in hi-viz since you are doing a lot of highway and around town. Something warm too, especially if you are buying a naked bike. Tour Master Transition comes to mind.
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lvscrvs screwed with this post 12-17-2012 at 07:59 PM Reason: sorry, it's gladius, not galdius as i wrote previously... doh
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Old 12-17-2012, 04:57 PM   #33
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Quote:
Originally Posted by kantuckid View Post
A 100hp bike as a starter bike. Not the smart choice,even with the best training.
I was thinking it was somewhere around 70hp, and at that it could be quite challenging for a beginning rider. But I just had a look at the specs...95hp!
Definitely NOT a good starter bike...but now I've gotta go look at one!

@ brandonmccann, Do yourself and your loved ones a favor and don't get this bike till you've been riding for 2 years! (and several thousand miles)
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Old 12-17-2012, 04:58 PM   #34
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Quote:
Originally Posted by lvscrvs View Post
You might look at the Suzuki Galdius...
Yup, the SV650, Gladius, or even V-Strom 650 would all be good choices too (maybe better choices).

The Shiver/Dorsoduro are actually quite tame in "Rain" mode. It not only decreases throttle response, but also dials back horsepower to a more manageable low 70's. I do agree that it is a lot of bike for a first, I just think it is three bikes in one.
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Old 12-17-2012, 05:23 PM   #35
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Originally Posted by High Country Herb View Post
Yup, the SV650, Gladius, or even V-Strom 650 would all be good choices too (maybe better choices).
DL650 is too tall. It can be lowered, but.. there are other (great) options.
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Old 12-17-2012, 11:48 PM   #36
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Originally Posted by High Country Herb View Post
Yup, the SV650, Gladius, or even V-Strom 650 would all be good choices too (maybe better choices).

The Shiver/Dorsoduro are actually quite tame in "Rain" mode. It not only decreases throttle response, but also dials back horsepower to a more manageable low 70's. I do agree that it is a lot of bike for a first, I just think it is three bikes in one.
Yeah, I was planning on keeping it in the Rain mapping for a pretty good while if I did go with the Shiver. Where I live, there's a ton of empty highway to get practice on. Same place my dad took me to learn to drive, is the same place I'll take myself to learn to ride. That sounded lame..

As for the MSF classes...not yet. I will in March when the weather warms up. In Texas, to get your motorcycle license, you have to take a riding course(to my understanding). After I take the riding course and I've had a little experience with my bike(whatever I end up with)I am planning on taking the extended course with my dad. Father-son type thing.

edit:That Suzuki Gladius bike doesn't seem too bad. I'll definitely have to do some more research into it.

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Old 12-17-2012, 11:58 PM   #37
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Quote:
Originally Posted by tedder View Post
DL650 is too tall. It can be lowered, but.. there are other (great) options.
Gotta agree with that. My missus rides a lowered DL650, and while she's managed it quite well, she's not a beginner, but she's dropped it a few times on parking lots. She recently tested a Gladius, and was much more comfortable with it, even though that bike wasn't lowered. The Gladius is MUCH smaller in physical size. Problem is, she still wants a tourer, so the DL stays...

That Gladius engine is now also on the new DL, it really is a peach. Virtually unbreakable, and very good fuel economy, too.

Pecha72 screwed with this post 12-18-2012 at 12:20 AM
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Old 12-18-2012, 01:46 AM   #38
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Quote:
Originally Posted by JustKip View Post
I was thinking it was somewhere around 70hp, and at that it could be quite challenging for a beginning rider. But I just had a look at the specs...95hp!
Definitely NOT a good starter bike...but now I've gotta go look at one!

@ brandonmccann, Do yourself and your loved ones a favor and don't get this bike till you've been riding for 2 years! (and several thousand miles)
+1
Get the 22hp vs 100hp to get out of the way. I know anything can happen at any speed but a new rider on a 100 hp bike doing 75-80 on the freeway with no on ramp!! Started out on a trail 90 and when I got a S90 I thought I was on a Gixxer.Try not to ride my xt225 on SoCal freeways but rode one from SoCal to Boise Id and back 2500 miles through Vegas.Scariest ride of my like. Get a small used bike, learn how to ride properly and ride the piss out of it. its not the height you should be concerned with but the cars and trucks that will DEMAND that you start, stop, look, listen, swerve in a half of a second to make it home safe. We all want you to ride but take some of the insanity out of it. I am sure your dad did not let you take his Lambo out by yourself your first day of driving. I see salesmen trying to sell a sport bike to a new rider and I want to smack him, both actually. Most hunters start out with BB guns, not a 30-06, there is a reason for that.
Not trying to start something with the hunter comment, just using it as an example. Sorry, but a 100 hp bike with a new rider,and I know there are some, but it still makes me nuts.
Good luck with your decision, ride safe.
PS, Old man on a bike is a great read!!
Heirhead

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Old 12-19-2012, 04:11 AM   #39
motolocopat
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VERY First Bike?

If you are looking at it for your VERY first bike, or more accuratly, the first motorycle you have ridden, I highly suggest that you get some experience on something that you can fall on... a dirt bike.
Since you live in a small town I'd hope you could easily find a place to ride, maybe even know someone who has a low powered dirtbike to learn the basics of shifting and braking on.
I've gone through this process a few times over the 40 years I've ridden and taught friends and family to ride and what you want to do is get enough time on a low powered motorcycle that allows you concentrate on shifting up up up and braking and shifting down down down turning accelerating braking turning accelerating turning and braking and accelerating and turning. Doe this until you no longer have to think about the shifting and braking and your thoughts are revolving around the sliding that the bike is doing as you accelerate and brake at the limits of traction. You know you have reached them when you fall down.
Repeat the process until you don't fall down very often.
Repeat the entire process with a relatively powerfull dirtbike....
THEN go buy any streetbike you want to... the only thing you will worry about at that point are the nuts on the road and it is very difficult to keep an eye on them when you are a noob trying to figure out how to shift.

If you did this for 5-6 hours a day a normally talented young man can move through each stage over a few weekends.
You will also learn something that is VERY difficult to learn on the street but will eventually come in extremely valuable.... how to slide... it is a normal process in the dirt but normally only done on the street during the "Oh No" moments. Dirtbikes are also tall and you will develop a confidence of handling a bike while just one foot is planted... that's all you need if you know how to ride....

Remember......... If You Ain't Sliding you Ain't Riding
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Old 12-19-2012, 05:10 AM   #40
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not sure what you exactly are after in bike type
take a look at the Triumph America, Speedmaster, or even Bonneville.
you'll find the ground with both feet
Decent quality and well priced
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Old 12-19-2012, 11:09 AM   #41
High Country Herb
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Quote:
Originally Posted by motolocopat View Post
If you are looking at it for your VERY first bike, or more accuratly, the first motorycle you have ridden, I highly suggest that you get some experience on something that you can fall on... a dirt bike.
Since you live in a small town I'd hope you could easily find a place to ride, maybe even know someone who has a low powered dirtbike to learn the basics of shifting and braking on.
I've gone through this process a few times over the 40 years I've ridden and taught friends and family to ride and what you want to do is get enough time on a low powered motorcycle that allows you concentrate on shifting up up up and braking and shifting down down down turning accelerating braking turning accelerating turning and braking and accelerating and turning. Doe this until you no longer have to think about the shifting and braking and your thoughts are revolving around the sliding that the bike is doing as you accelerate and brake at the limits of traction. You know you have reached them when you fall down.
Repeat the process until you don't fall down very often.
Repeat the entire process with a relatively powerfull dirtbike....
THEN go buy any streetbike you want to... the only thing you will worry about at that point are the nuts on the road and it is very difficult to keep an eye on them when you are a noob trying to figure out how to shift.

If you did this for 5-6 hours a day a normally talented young man can move through each stage over a few weekends.
You will also learn something that is VERY difficult to learn on the street but will eventually come in extremely valuable.... how to slide... it is a normal process in the dirt but normally only done on the street during the "Oh No" moments. Dirtbikes are also tall and you will develop a confidence of handling a bike while just one foot is planted... that's all you need if you know how to ride....

Remember......... If You Ain't Sliding you Ain't Riding
Very good advice, and well described.

I guess I did that, with the exception of a Ninja 636 in between the small and large dirt bike. I knew it was a mistake, but I won the bike in a raffle so it wasn't my fault. After being very fortunate to survive a year on that little devil, I resumed progression on a 600 dual sport, then the Aprilia. Starting out on something that can take a fall will save lots of money in plastic bits...
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Old 12-19-2012, 10:01 PM   #42
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Quote:
Originally Posted by motolocopat View Post
If you are looking at it for your VERY first bike, or more accuratly, the first motorycle you have ridden, I highly suggest that you get some experience on something that you can fall on... a dirt bike.
Since you live in a small town I'd hope you could easily find a place to ride, maybe even know someone who has a low powered dirtbike to learn the basics of shifting and braking on.
I've gone through this process a few times over the 40 years I've ridden and taught friends and family to ride and what you want to do is get enough time on a low powered motorcycle that allows you concentrate on shifting up up up and braking and shifting down down down turning accelerating braking turning accelerating turning and braking and accelerating and turning. Doe this until you no longer have to think about the shifting and braking and your thoughts are revolving around the sliding that the bike is doing as you accelerate and brake at the limits of traction. You know you have reached them when you fall down.
Repeat the process until you don't fall down very often.
Repeat the entire process with a relatively powerfull dirtbike....
THEN go buy any streetbike you want to... the only thing you will worry about at that point are the nuts on the road and it is very difficult to keep an eye on them when you are a noob trying to figure out how to shift.

If you did this for 5-6 hours a day a normally talented young man can move through each stage over a few weekends.
You will also learn something that is VERY difficult to learn on the street but will eventually come in extremely valuable.... how to slide... it is a normal process in the dirt but normally only done on the street during the "Oh No" moments. Dirtbikes are also tall and you will develop a confidence of handling a bike while just one foot is planted... that's all you need if you know how to ride....

Remember......... If You Ain't Sliding you Ain't Riding
Well, it won't be the first bike I've EVER ridden. I used to ride my dirt bike quite a lot as a kid. Eventually I just got too big for it and didn't have a place to ride nor did my dad have the time to take me, work and all. I did pretty well on it back then. I've got a few "Don't ever do that" scars ;)
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Old 12-20-2012, 03:07 AM   #43
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What's your general location, Brandon? You never know what Craigslist might turn up. Could be a local inmate would help you check out a used bike.

Sarah
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Old 12-20-2012, 03:37 AM   #44
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Good to go

OK if you rode a dirt bike as a kid and were comfortable riding the wheels off of it then you should be able to handle something like the Shiver assuming you ride it with the respect it deserves.

Someone mentioned Ducati Monsters and they are cool bikes. You can pick up slightly used ones that will hold their value real well and they are actually pretty simple engines and reliable.

As for being short I lived in Ecuador for a bunch of years and rode with a bunch of guys there who were in the 5'5" range and they rode full sized dirtbikes with 36' seat heights ..just slide off to side of seat and one footed it.
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Old 12-20-2012, 08:41 PM   #45
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What's your general location, Brandon? You never know what Craigslist might turn up. Could be a local inmate would help you check out a used bike.

Sarah
I live in Snyder. It's in west texas out by lubbock, san angelo, abilene, midland, sweetwater...those are all the closest cities that people tend to know of around me.
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