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Old 01-04-2013, 07:02 AM   #31
Sound Farm OP
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that black super 10 is sic!!!!!
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Old 01-04-2013, 12:54 PM   #32
gplassm
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I guess that every passenger is going to have a different opinion. My wife and I just went out looking for a new bike last weekend. we say on V-Stroms, both the 1000, and the 650 (both pretty comfortable for her, the top case would have to move back on the 1000), the new NC700X (this bike felt very small, overall, and she did not like it at all), a new Multistrada S (this one was only "OK" for her), a 2010 FJ1300 (we both like this one, even though it had no top case for her to lean on), and a 2012 KTM 990 SM-T (which was surprisingly comfortable for both of us). The dealerships did not have the new CB1100, an S10, or any of the 990 Adventures, and we have not visited a Triumph or a BMW dealership yet.
Right now, our choice is between one of the DL's (it doesn't seem to matter which one, as each has their good points), and the SM-T. She is pushing me towards the SM-T, just because she knows I would have more fun on it alone. The price premium is around $3k (for the KTM, over a DL1000)
The DL's are solid, if a bit boring. The SM-T can have weird issues, like fuel tanks that do not re-fit after being removed, and gauge clusters that fog up, but I enjoy being a bit more involved in my ownership. I am a bit nervous at the thought of owning a BMW, an Aprilia, or even a 'Guzzi.
Right now, a new DL1000 Adventure can be had for around $9,200. That is *very* tempting. Only the NC700X can compete with it price-wise, and that was knocked out on the first round of "seat-testing".
Decisions, decisions... We are enjoying the shopping, though. I am shopping for an enduro bike as well, so I wish that we had a Beta dealer nearby...
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Old 01-04-2013, 01:02 PM   #33
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Up until now, I had thought that the big DL1000 was pretty much the King of Comfort, in the Adventure segment, unless one was to spring $20k for a GS, but in the past year or so, there have been quite a few comfort contenders that have sprung up - the S10, the Caponord, and the Triumphs (Tiger and Adventure) to complicate the issue. Each seems to be better at *something* than the 'Strom 1000, but the big DL is still a great value, and a great bike overall. I do not know what we will buy, but I have much the same intentions as the OP, I want to be able to take my wife on some longer trips this year. My trusty old DR650 did well for shorter trips (say, under 2 hours), but was not well suited for slab travel at all.
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Old 01-05-2013, 07:44 AM   #34
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We have a Super Tenere and my lady likes it a lot. Last night we went to the Progressive m/c show in DC to try a number of other bikes and her preferences in order were:

2013 MultiStrada
She really likes the Super Tenere but said the foam on the Strada and slightly higher seating would take it if pushed to decide. She's barely 5'2" and thin. Note that this is the new 'Strada and the seats have changed from previous years.

Super Tenere & & R1200GS
The GS and Tenere were a wash stock, but since it is so easy to put a spacer under the front of the Tenere seat and flatten it, the Tenere won out. She can not see past me on either, which was a feather for the Multi.

FJR & R1200RT
The FJR seat shape was slightly better for her.

BMW K16

Goldwing
Basically she felt trapped in an overstuffed chair. She said it would make sense on a long interstate ride but not for our style.

DL650 / DL1000
We've had both. Tried the 2013 last night and still slotted in about here. Somewhere in this area of the scale were also the Honda 700 and Tiger 800s.

Triumph 1200 Explorer
This one was a surprise. She found the pillion would just have to be replaced, due to slope, hardness, and shape. She also felt it was the ugliest of the lot, which was a surprise, as we have a Tenere and just got off the GS.

Cruisers
There were a couple OK ones, but none she really liked.

Sport bikes
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Wreckchecker screwed with this post 01-05-2013 at 07:50 AM
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Old 01-05-2013, 09:28 AM   #35
gplassm
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Wreckchecker View Post
We have a Super Tenere and my lady likes it a lot. Last night we went to the Progressive m/c show in DC to try a number of other bikes and her preferences in order were:

2013 MultiStrada
She really likes the Super Tenere but said the foam on the Strada and slightly higher seating would take it if pushed to decide. She's barely 5'2" and thin. Note that this is the new 'Strada and the seats have changed from previous years.

Super Tenere & & R1200GS
The GS and Tenere were a wash stock, but since it is so easy to put a spacer under the front of the Tenere seat and flatten it, the Tenere won out. She can not see past me on either, which was a feather for the Multi.

FJR & R1200RT
The FJR seat shape was slightly better for her.

BMW K16

Goldwing
Basically she felt trapped in an overstuffed chair. She said it would make sense on a long interstate ride but not for our style.

DL650 / DL1000
We've had both. Tried the 2013 last night and still slotted in about here. Somewhere in this area of the scale were also the Honda 700 and Tiger 800s.

Triumph 1200 Explorer
This one was a surprise. She found the pillion would just have to be replaced, due to slope, hardness, and shape. She also felt it was the ugliest of the lot, which was a surprise, as we have a Tenere and just got off the GS.

Cruisers
There were a couple OK ones, but none she really liked.

Sport bikes
My wife had similar, but a bit shuffled findings when we sat on those same bikes last weekend. A few things that are influencing our decision are - the Multi and the GS are $20k. No getting around that. The others are significantly less expensive. The Multi, with all of its electronic wizardry, does not bolster my confidence. I can not help but to think what items will not be working 4 or 5 years from now. The Beemer, well, posts of ridiculously high service costs have me a bit scared to commit to one - of *any* size.
I am surprised to hear that your Lady slotted the new Honda 700 in with the DL's. For my wife, the NC700X was clearly the worst of the bunch. the passenger seat is tiny, and the requirement for it to be hinged for fuel cap access may hinder aftermarket support. To me, the whole bike felt tiny, but I would definitely consider it if I was looking for a low budget, solo bike.
We have not tried any of the Triumph's yet, but having owned on in the past, and having experienced enough "Triumph problems", I am a bit gun shy.
A big DL can be had, new, for well under $10k, with slightly used, well sorted ones easily found for much less. My *only* concern at this time is that it will not be *fun* enough, when riding solo. Whatever bike I get must be comfy 2-up, and yet still wheelie and slide when solo. I have not been able to discern if the big 'Strom will do this.
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Old 01-05-2013, 10:14 AM   #36
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My wife said after a test ride, that NC700X pillion ergonomics are virtually nonexistent compared to a DL of any size or model year.
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Old 01-05-2013, 10:36 AM   #37
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Good to know! Thanks, Pecha!
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Old 01-05-2013, 10:45 AM   #38
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a Tiger 955i is a good bet IF you have long legs, best two up bike I have ever owned but mine came w/ a Corbin seat, don't know if this would be the case with the stock seat...clean late model (2005-2006) examples go for $4-5 K.
And a LOT of fun solo too, plenty of power, good handling, and a wonderful howl from the triple at high revs....
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Old 01-05-2013, 12:08 PM   #39
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Have to agree with those mentioning the Super Tenere; roomy, comfortable, plenty of torque, lots of suspension adjustability, it has to be at the top of the list.

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Old 01-05-2013, 05:01 PM   #40
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I find it interesting that many people do shy away from the "beemer electronics". My thoughts are that there are no more nor any less electronics on a BMW that will let you stranded. Nor are they any more prone to failure...

If you are going to shy away from any bike due to electronics, I think you are letting yourself be thrown off by the Internet's lack of common sense. :) That being said, sure, fancy things like electric suspension, etc are potential failure points. But all modern bikes have an ECU with electronic ignition and myriads of other engine controls and sensors that I won't pretend to be fully knowledgable about.

Buy the bike that fits you and your passenger the best and just ride the wheels off!!!



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Old 01-05-2013, 05:30 PM   #41
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Some of us just prefer more basic, simple technology. Some things, like electronic ignitions, have proven themselves and stood the test of time. Things like "smart" suspension scare me. I like to yank my shocks apart myself, and some of these new technologies do not lend themselves to the home tinkerer very well. Most newer electronics have some sort of fail-safe built in, but I hate to own anything that has features that do not work.
Peter Egan recently wrote a column about his Ulysses, that had thrown a CEL. When he returned from riding his CB550, the CEL had miraculously cured itself. I would *hate* to experience a "self curing" CEL! This only means that it is going to happen again, probably at a worse time, and probably *not* cure itself.
I don't want to own a bike that even *has* a CEL. Ducati's Multistrada S scares me with its complexity. The KTM's and the V-Strom's do not. Even though FI has proven itself in cars, I am still on the fence as to whether or not it actually belongs in bikes. Jets and needles are fine, as long as the carbs are accessible, and therein lies the rub.
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Old 01-05-2013, 05:39 PM   #42
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Quote:
Originally Posted by gplassm View Post
My wife had similar, but a bit shuffled findings when we sat on those same bikes last weekend. A few things that are influencing our decision are - the Multi and the GS are $20k. No getting around that. The others are significantly less expensive. The Multi, with all of its electronic wizardry, does not bolster my confidence. I can not help but to think what items will not be working 4 or 5 years from now. The Beemer, well, posts of ridiculously high service costs have me a bit scared to commit to one - of *any* size.
I am surprised to hear that your Lady slotted the new Honda 700 in with the DL's. For my wife, the NC700X was clearly the worst of the bunch. the passenger seat is tiny, and the requirement for it to be hinged for fuel cap access may hinder aftermarket support. To me, the whole bike felt tiny, but I would definitely consider it if I was looking for a low budget, solo bike.
We have not tried any of the Triumph's yet, but having owned on in the past, and having experienced enough "Triumph problems", I am a bit gun shy.
A big DL can be had, new, for well under $10k, with slightly used, well sorted ones easily found for much less. My *only* concern at this time is that it will not be *fun* enough, when riding solo. Whatever bike I get must be comfy 2-up, and yet still wheelie and slide when solo. I have not been able to discern if the big 'Strom will do this.
The Multi had the seat she liked most, but no question that all around, she LOVES our Tenere! Stock, the seat had a slightly forward tilt that was similar to the Beemer so I did raise the front of her seat about 3/8" and she has a plug for her heated jacket now.


We've done 10 hour days and rutted trails and she's happy, so I feel blessed.
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Old 01-05-2013, 06:04 PM   #43
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Quote:
Originally Posted by gplassm View Post
Some of us just prefer more basic, simple technology. Some things, like electronic ignitions, have proven themselves and stood the test of time. Things like "smart" suspension scare me. I like to yank my shocks apart myself, and some of these new technologies do not lend themselves to the home tinkerer very well. Most newer electronics have some sort of fail-safe built in, but I hate to own anything that has features that do not work.
Peter Egan recently wrote a column about his Ulysses, that had thrown a CEL. When he returned from riding his CB550, the CEL had miraculously cured itself. I would *hate* to experience a "self curing" CEL! This only means that it is going to happen again, probably at a worse time, and probably *not* cure itself.
I don't want to own a bike that even *has* a CEL. Ducati's Multistrada S scares me with its complexity. The KTM's and the V-Strom's do not. Even though FI has proven itself in cars, I am still on the fence as to whether or not it actually belongs in bikes. Jets and needles are fine, as long as the carbs are accessible, and therein lies the rub.
It seems inevitable that certain segments of the market will continue to "benefit" from a lot of technology. This includes the touring (including ADV touring) segments. It's okay, to a point, but when it involves consumables, like shocks, it's a worry. I believe I read somewhere that a replacement rear electronically adjustable unit on a GS runs something like 2500, installed. If it went on the road somewhere, you'd likely pay all of that. I had no troubles with mine on my 2010 GS, but when I sold the bike, I was relieved to have passed it along before any of the expensive stuff needed work.

The manufacturers are competing with this stuff, and it's not likely to go away. Until it becomes failsafe (which it ain't yet), it will cause occasional MASSIVE headaches to unlucky riders. Triumph service intervals on the Explorer 1200 are 10k miles. Time will tell if the bike is robust enough to be worry free between services (assuming that the owner is alert and cares for the bike properly).
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Old 01-05-2013, 07:23 PM   #44
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To the two earlier posters considering the FJR. It is my favorite bike but my wife cannot stand more than 30 minutes on it. I've even added a custom seat and peg lowering kit for her. Still doesn't work for her. Plus she says the factory trunk vibrates into her back. In her defense, the mounting of the tourpack is too tightly spaced and it noticably shakes. She rides on the Uly without any issue and can sleep in the Ural's sidecar easily. Her favorite 2 wheeler was a GL1500. (moreso than the 1200 or 1800)
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Old 01-05-2013, 07:28 PM   #45
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Quote:
Originally Posted by gplassm View Post
Some of us just prefer more basic, simple technology. Some things, like electronic ignitions, have proven themselves and stood the test of time. Things like "smart" suspension scare me. I like to yank my shocks apart myself, and some of these new technologies do not lend themselves to the home tinkerer very well. Most newer electronics have some sort of fail-safe built in, but I hate to own anything that has features that do not work.
Peter Egan recently wrote a column about his Ulysses, that had thrown a CEL. When he returned from riding his CB550, the CEL had miraculously cured itself. I would *hate* to experience a "self curing" CEL! This only means that it is going to happen again, probably at a worse time, and probably *not* cure itself.
I don't want to own a bike that even *has* a CEL. Ducati's Multistrada S scares me with its complexity. The KTM's and the V-Strom's do not. Even though FI has proven itself in cars, I am still on the fence as to whether or not it actually belongs in bikes. Jets and needles are fine, as long as the carbs are accessible, and therein lies the rub.
No doubt, I agree with you quite a bit. I guess it comes down to each of us finding our own "tipping point" and making the choice to plow ahead or stay several generations behind the curve. Nothing wrong with either choice...its just a preference, I suppose.

I'm an IT Engineer, which puts me in a situation where I deal with somewhat leading technology. This has caused me to prefer being one step behind the latest, greatest. Some people prefer bleeding edge...as in jumping feet first from the high-dive onto a 10-foot long razor blade into a pool of iodine. I'll stick with the "new" technology that's just a couple years old.
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