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Old 12-31-2012, 12:42 PM   #1
Alaskahack OP
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Winter in Alaska 2012-2013

Happy New Year Everyone
I had my first chance to do a snow ride a couple days after Christmas, then it took me a couple of days to figure out how to embed a video. The video is a little boring but it gets eciting when a grader goes by me









The Video

[IMG][/IMG]


For Some Reason this doesn't work on a I-Pad
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Alaskahack screwed with this post 12-31-2012 at 03:06 PM Reason: Adding info This doesn't on a I-Pad
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Old 12-31-2012, 09:37 PM   #2
Tim McKittrick
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When you decide to make up a set of studded tires let me know- I've done a few sets for my hack over the years and I have the correct tools at my disposal....
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Old 01-01-2013, 09:24 AM   #3
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Tim
Thanks for the offer, I took the oufit out a couple days in a row last week the first day solo and just cruising around the neighberhood, up and down Lucille a couple of times. I'm not sure if you had the patience to watch the clip, but I kept starting and stoping to see how much control I had on hard packed ice and snow. And it actuall worked better then I thought it would.. The next day I took it out with a 200 lb. passanger but it was a little warmer, Schrock, Fishhook, Parks were all good,dropped my passanger off and came back home. But I had a hard time moving up a small incline had to get off and push.
I'm thinking about going with chains, I will let you know how that goes


Bob
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Old 01-02-2013, 01:27 PM   #4
richardak
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I have my rig almost done! It is a Cozy sidecar attached to my '83 R100RT. The subframe and all mounting hardware either made by or modified by DMC, thanks to Jay! and his crew. I just got it together last Saturday and wanted to try it out but with just a street tire on the rear, I couldn't make it out of the driveway due to the slick conditions. I'm now shopping for a new rear tire that I would be able to stud but hampered by the limited tire selection for these older bikes. I used to have a Heidenau K60 on the rear but wore it out and couldn't find a replacement in OR last summer in the appropriate size.

I still need to wire things up, install some turn signals and check the alignment. Then learn how to ride it.


richardak screwed with this post 01-02-2013 at 01:32 PM Reason: Smaller photo
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Old 01-02-2013, 01:37 PM   #5
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Hey RichardAK, that looks like a fine job you've done. Drive safe and have fun!
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Old 01-02-2013, 09:41 PM   #6
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richardak

Have you checked with Jay about getting a automotive modification for a rear wheel

Make sure you get the toe-in correct. LOL long story, but make sure you get it right

Just a thought
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Alaskahack screwed with this post 01-02-2013 at 09:45 PM Reason: Added info about tou-in
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Old 01-03-2013, 09:06 AM   #7
richardak
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Originally Posted by Alaskahack View Post
richardak

Have you checked with Jay about getting a automotive modification for a rear wheel

Make sure you get the toe-in correct. LOL long story, but make sure you get it right

Just a thought
I haven't given much thought to the rear wheel besides looking for a more aggressive tread and now looking at studding options. The older airheads use a double sided swing arm so there isn't much room fo a wider tire. As it is, there is less than 1/8" between the sidewall and the driveshaft.

I spent quite a bit of time on the toe-in since my bike, as do many others your GS included, has a larger section width tire on the rear so I couldn't simply put a straight edge against the motocycle tires. Maybe with a spacer it'll work. I ended up with a line on the garage floor and moving the rig so the center of the motorcycle tires were on the line. Repeated the whole process several times to ensure that the bike was on the line. But thank you for the reminder...
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Old 01-03-2013, 10:59 AM   #8
Tim McKittrick
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I have been using old block style trials universals as a basis for my "snow" tires. They are cheap, available in a multitude of sizes, and easy to stud. I suspect there are better options out there, traction wise- they do work, but they certainly aren't fantastic. A car tire conversion for the RT would be hard because of the swingarm design- if a GS style single sided arm could be retrofitted your options would open up considerably.

I have toyed with toe and lean a bit with my rig over the years and have found that bike lean has a greater effect on trim than toe- I have had the toe on mine vary by a few degrees and it's pretty hard to tell the difference. Lean seems to establish the "trim speed" at which the rig will run true without any steering inputs. I have mine set to "Trim" at about 50mph, so when running at highway speeds it'll take a bit of left rudder to keep it going straight, but it's really pleasant at 40-60 which is ideal for tooling about in the valley.

I suspect that toe-in will be more important with car tires- but lean should still establish the speed at which the outfit operates easily.
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Old 01-03-2013, 11:32 AM   #9
richardak
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Tim McKittrick View Post
I have been using old block style trials universals as a basis for my "snow" tires. They are cheap, available in a multitude of sizes, and easy to stud. I suspect there are better options out there, traction wise- they do work, but they certainly aren't fantastic. A car tire conversion for the RT would be hard because of the swingarm design- if a GS style single sided arm could be retrofitted your options would open up considerably.

I have toyed with toe and lean a bit with my rig over the years and have found that bike lean has a greater effect on trim than toe- I have had the toe on mine vary by a few degrees and it's pretty hard to tell the difference. Lean seems to establish the "trim speed" at which the rig will run true without any steering inputs. I have mine set to "Trim" at about 50mph, so when running at highway speeds it'll take a bit of left rudder to keep it going straight, but it's really pleasant at 40-60 which is ideal for tooling about in the valley.

I suspect that toe-in will be more important with car tires- but lean should still establish the speed at which the outfit operates easily.
The folks at DMC suggested I look for a trials tire but I wasn't sure whether they could be studded. I just got the rig together last Monday so I've just started looking for suitable tires. Apparently I don't multitask very well. Fortunately, lean is pretty easy to adjust and I was kind of thinking the same thing. 40-60 sounds like a good target around AK, especially in the Interior.

This is all new to me so I really appreciate the feedback.
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Old 01-03-2013, 12:10 PM   #10
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Wow shows how much I know about mototcycles

The reason I mention toe- in so much is because I had a lot of tire wear on the inside of my new sidecar tire.

I heard so much about drawing the lines on the floor and every thing I tried,I couldn't really get it right by myself. I finally figured out in order to have the straight lines I needed something long enough and straight. I ended up getting 8' metal studs and I then took all of my measure from the rear of the bike when your talking fractions of a inch, I really needed two people to finallize my measurements.

Tim I agree with you on the lean out, my car has has ECC (electric camber control) and I'm able to adjust my lean on the fly
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Old 01-03-2013, 12:30 PM   #11
Tim McKittrick
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I'd stick with a DOT approved trials tire and not use one of the competition units, as those are super soft (not to mention expensive) and have really pliable sidewalls- great for trials riding on a 140 pound machine but probably not suitable for a 700 pound outfit that'll do 70mph.

The IRC tr1 is cheap and I've had decent luck with it, or the Shinko Sr241. A little more upscale might be the Pirelli MT43, but it is bordering on a competition design, although it's still DOT approved.
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Old 01-03-2013, 01:32 PM   #12
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It is possible to put an automotive rear wheel and tire on the RT however it takes a custom wheel and the tire is a hard to come by size 125 15, Not really worth all the effort on this bike.
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Old 01-03-2013, 01:57 PM   #13
richardak
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Tim McKittrick View Post
I'd stick with a DOT approved trials tire and not use one of the competition units, as those are super soft (not to mention expensive) and have really pliable sidewalls- great for trials riding on a 140 pound machine but probably not suitable for a 700 pound outfit that'll do 70mph.

The IRC tr1 is cheap and I've had decent luck with it, or the Shinko Sr241. A little more upscale might be the Pirelli MT43, but it is bordering on a competition design, although it's still DOT approved.
I just ordered the IRC TR-1 rear tire from a local shop. They had never heard the term "trials tire" and just had me look through their catalog to find something. Thank you for the confirmation that I didn't make a stupid choice. For now, I'll just keep the Heidenau K60 on the front as it already has over 8k on it and is still has lots of rubber on it.
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Old 01-03-2013, 03:42 PM   #14
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I would think that a Shinko 700 would stud well.
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Old 01-03-2013, 11:11 PM   #15
Tim McKittrick
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Originally Posted by richardak View Post
They had never heard the term "trials tire" and just had me look through their catalog to find something.
I try not to let it get me down. Last summer I called the Yamaha dealer trying to find the correct timing spec for my 1975 DT175. When I asked how many mm BTDC the points were supposed to open (non advanced) I might as well have said "Blgraf fenharf gugen fard beedlebugges".
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