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Old 01-06-2013, 10:49 AM   #1
k12lts OP
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Oil pan gasket

I pulled the oil pan an a recently acquired 81 R100 to check out the inside of the engine. I'm ready to reassemble and the manuals (Clymer and Haynes) say to use sealant on the gasket but the original gasket came off dry.

Also, the prior owner replaced the push tube seals and the ones on the right side sealed fine but the left side both leak pretty bad. I can tell the seals look newer, can they be tapped in to be tightened up or do I need to pull that side an replace them?

What do the experts say??
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Old 01-06-2013, 11:10 AM   #2
Mark Manley
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I replaced the sump on several bikes with no sealant on the gasket and they have never leaked a drop, but I am not sure that I am an expert.
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Mark Manley screwed with this post 01-06-2013 at 11:11 AM Reason: more info
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Old 01-06-2013, 11:23 AM   #3
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Install it dry

I rub a bit of oil on both sides just prior to installing the gasket, mine have never leaked (knock on wood). Good call on pulling the pan to inspect the inside. On bikes that have low miles or have sat around along time there is usually a film of old oil that is best not circulated into the engine. Total cost about $7 - $9 dollars for piece of mind. ANd don't over tighten those little bolts either, does not take much to hold the pan on, you don't want to risk stripping a thread. Good luck!
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Old 01-06-2013, 11:58 AM   #4
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Thanks for the tips, dry was my first thought too.

The inside looked very clean, just a skim of stuff in the bottom of the pan that was easily wiped out with a paper shop towel.
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Old 01-06-2013, 12:03 PM   #5
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I have installed dozens and dozens of them with real good luck IMO. I put absolutely nothing on them. I clean the surfaces with a big flat Exacto blade. IMO the real deal is using a inch pound torque wrench and go round and round until they all click tight. Stripped sump bolts? I have never had a problem with it. Personally, I rarely see it. Then after a ride or two re-torque them the same way. Round and round until they all click at the same time. Then re-torque about once a year. Don't loosen them up and then re=torque. Just put the wrench on them and see if they click.
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Old 01-07-2013, 04:57 PM   #6
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Wanting to get my R100S oil temp. a little lower.
I'm currantly planning on installing a "Breil" type oil cooler, a ducted spacer which goes above the oil pan.
This will require 2 oil pan gaskets.
Not sure if I want to risk installation with no gasket sealants.
Anyone have thoughts on this?
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Old 01-07-2013, 05:04 PM   #7
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Personally, I use no sealant so they won't leak, not so they will.
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Old 01-07-2013, 05:09 PM   #8
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Quote:
Originally Posted by supershaft View Post
Personally, I use no sealant so they won't leak, not so they will.

I've never used sealants on oil pans either.
Why would using sealants make them more prone to leakage?
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Old 01-07-2013, 06:00 PM   #9
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The biggest reason IMO would be the gasket squeezing out. I guess next IMO would be that the gasket can't soak up enough oil like is is designed to do so it can't swell the right amount but I really don't know for sure. I have seen tons of them installed with sealant. I think they work better without.
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Old 01-08-2013, 11:44 AM   #10
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Quote:
Originally Posted by supershaft View Post
The biggest reason IMO would be the gasket squeezing out. I guess next IMO would be that the gasket can't soak up enough oil like is is designed to do so it can't swell the right amount but I really don't know for sure. I have seen tons of them installed with sealant. I think they work better without.

I purchased some "Hylomar" sealant from Hucky's last year and used it when sealing my front engine cover after changing the timing chain. It is a German made sealant that has some solvent type properties.
Very foul smelling stuff. It is supposed to be used very sparingly.
The material has to be applied and then sit for 10 minutes or so for the solvents to diminish according to the label. I've never used sealant of its' type before. Strange stuff. No leaks in any event from my one time use. Didn't want to chance a leak since the front cover is not a very friendly part to reseal.
Not sure if I want to use it on the oil pan. I've been plagued with oil leaks on this engine. Always seeing a "drip" from the oil pan rear. Finally found that the oil pressure sender was leaking, once it got worse and oil was traveling down to the rear of the pan.
I don't possess an inch lb. torque wrench anymore. I usually tighten the oil pan bolts in the proper sequence with a "nut driver type" tool so as not to over tighten them. Getting the torque correct is tough without a good inch lb. wrench. Used to have a high dollar Snap-on one but sold it as I never used it...then after getting into airheads 20 years ago, wish I would have kept it.
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Old 01-08-2013, 07:49 PM   #11
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I use to use Rolls Royce stuff. It came in a yellow and blue tune if I remember right. Since then I have used Durko for decades with real good luck. I have been told it is the same stuff as the Rolls Royce stuff which is also the same stuff as Yamabond. I install front cover gaskets clean with absolutely nothing on them for the same reasons I do the same thing with the sump gaskets. Personally, my front cover gasket did start weeping at around 70k miles unlike my sump gasket which was still sealing perfectly. As was my cylinder base seal and my pushrod tube seals. My head gasket did start leaking oil. They just do that sometimes. Nothing can be done about that AFAIK. The front cover gasket walking a bit was the cause of that. I suspect that had a little to do with me revving it way over redline all the time. I use Durko on base gaskets, cylinder bases, and on transmission covers since I don't use gaskets when I put them back together. That and oil pump covers is the only places I use sealant on airheads. IMO, I have had WAY better luck with oil leaks than many that I know of.

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Old 01-09-2013, 01:49 AM   #12
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I do my sumps with just a real light coat of fresh engine oil when I have used sealant in the past I've only put the glue on the sump pan side not the block side. This makes it easier to remove the pan later.
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Old 01-09-2013, 06:26 AM   #13
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Quote:
Originally Posted by bmwhacker View Post
I purchased some "Hylomar" sealant from Hucky's last year and used it when sealing my front engine cover after changing the timing chain. It is a German made sealant that has some solvent type properties..
I recently replaced my oil pan and used Hylomar. No leaks. It's great stuff because it does not harden. It stays tacky. I'm used to working on British bikes that are notorious drippers, so the Hylomar works wonders on them. I applied it on the BMW because the manual said... "it will leak" if sealant is not used. Ha! Maybe next time I'll try the dry method.
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Old 01-09-2013, 07:55 AM   #14
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The pan gaskets have a heat-activated sealant applied as a factory assembly aid since the extra step of applying liquid sealant is eliminated and presumably to cut down on warranty work (the old Butler&Smith "leaking, weeping or seeping" ploy proved to be BS) for leaky pans.

I use the belt-and-suspenders approach and apply a very thin coating ("a faint wipe") of RTV silicone sealant to the pna gasket on installation. It provides an extra marging of sealing, and also serves are a release agent so that the old gasket can be readily peeled off next time without scraping and cussing. The prevention of nicks and crapes on the pan matiing surfaces probably goes a long way to minimizing future leaks.

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