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Old 01-15-2013, 04:13 AM   #31
Rockmuncher
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+1

[QUOTE=kellymac530;20484610]I get so sick of people always saying dont ride your bike there...get a better bike....buy a lighter bike {KTm, XR, DR, KLR....}

What if the OP and others like me do NOT want a different bike?

I want to ride hundreds of miles on the hiway, and when I see something cool, I want to ride off hiway there, If there is mud on that trail or road, I will ride through it. If I fall I will have to pick it up. The OP is just looking for ideas on making that easier in tough circumstances. Not how to revamp his life to conform to what YOU think it should be.

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Old 01-15-2013, 04:45 AM   #32
bemiiten
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Couldn't find the link but someone makes a small, lightweight block and tackle that might help as long as their is something to hook it to. Other then that you need to find whats available in your surroundings ; Rocks , logs ECT...
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Old 01-15-2013, 04:55 AM   #33
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how to lift a motorcyle.

http://www.youtube.com/watch%3Fv%3DO...ZT6L2NcrEC0aOw
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Old 01-15-2013, 05:18 AM   #34
donmac
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I suspect there's a bit of CYA in Warn saying that the engine needed to be running. Given a healthy battery and a short time on the winch, I suspect it would be fine. I had a larger Warn on an ATV that I used often and a larger Warn 'winch in a bag' for my snowmobiles. I used the winch in a bag several times after getting my large 2-up touring sled uprighted and out - while out sledding by myself. No way I could have done that by myself. Note that the sled engine was not running when it was upside down and being uprighted by the winch. ;)

The concern about mounting the weight high is not a concern with that portable setup - you'd leave the winch at the anchor point while in use, not on the bike. Storage would be at the bottom of you pannier.

If I did a lot of solo snow/sand/mud riding with the GS I'd grab one of these portable winches and a spare battery. However, based on your riding style (and mine) it would probably be way overkill.
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Old 01-15-2013, 09:41 AM   #35
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Quote:
Originally Posted by tagesk View Post



[TaSK]
Looks like no traction at all. How did the rest of that day go?
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Old 01-15-2013, 09:45 AM   #36
tagesk
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Looks like no traction at all. How did the rest of that day go?
Ride Report in my Riding in Tuscany-thread, here.

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Old 01-15-2013, 11:17 AM   #37
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Thanks! Looks like a good read
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Old 01-15-2013, 11:37 AM   #38
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I know they make sand anchors for self extraction of trucks, maybe something similar could be used for a bike in the mud? It could provide an anchor point for a block and tackle.

http://www.pullpal.com/aboutPP.html
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Old 01-15-2013, 12:56 PM   #39
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A rope puller doesn't have the same line length limit a comealong does, your only limit is the amount of rope you're willing to carry.

The best mud extraction technique I've come across is the flop and spin or flop and drag, where the jug is supported by a mass of branches and the bike is sufficiently elevated on its side so the wheels are out of the rut they made. You can then drag it sideways and either spin to go out or continue flopping and spinning until you reach firm ground. Instead of relying on found branches or rocks to support the jug, a 1'x2'x.75" slab of UHMW Poly would make a nice (if rather short) sliding surface. The plastic is very slippery, it wouldn't take much effort to haul the head across it.
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Old 01-15-2013, 01:27 PM   #40
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would you consider taking along a pillion?
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Old 01-15-2013, 02:09 PM   #41
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Puller Looks Promising

Quote:
Originally Posted by Twilight Error View Post
A rope puller doesn't have the same line length limit a comealong does, your only limit is the amount of rope you're willing to carry.

The best mud extraction technique I've come across is the flop and spin or flop and drag, where the jug is supported by a mass of branches and the bike is sufficiently elevated on its side so the wheels are out of the rut they made. You can then drag it sideways and either spin to go out or continue flopping and spinning until you reach firm ground. Instead of relying on found branches or rocks to support the jug, a 1'x2'x.75" slab of UHMW Poly would make a nice (if rather short) sliding surface. The plastic is very slippery, it wouldn't take much effort to haul the head across it.
Weight is perhaps 8+lbs with extra rope [comes with only 25 feet]...what I have no experience with is how much leverage do you have with such a "come along". I mean could you pull on the handle and drag a 564 lb bike up a dirt bank? Or even a bike mired in deep mud.

Since this is about mud or ice this spin option is a method to inch your way out...but again up a bank, I doubt I could spin it. Even with plastic board I doubt I could drag my bike.

The anchor mentioned in other post is heavy...lightest version is 24 lbs and of questionable use on a variety of surfaces. You can improvise a "deadman annchor" if conditions are just right but still need a pulley system or winch.

The suggestion of bringing a Warn and extra battery [yes the Warn will kill a BMW GSA battery is very short order; I gave the Tech the GSAs battery specs] is not feasible in my world. But if you are willing to cart that weight, then yes it would be an option.

All this brings me personally full circle to a set of double pulleys, static climbing line, prusik lines, flat strap and hopefully a stout anchor to attach the line to. Read "tree" or "boulder/rock outcropping". Regardless of the system of pulling [winch, come along or pulleys] if you don't have a reachable anchor that will take the load, you don't have a system that is functional. You be stuck!
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Old 01-15-2013, 02:24 PM   #42
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Maybe something small like this to tie off to?
http://www.amazon.com/Beach-Umbrella.../dp/B0006GSLDG
Then use a pulley system?
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Old 01-15-2013, 04:19 PM   #43
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Warn winches has a new portable winch for us adv guys. Check out there website you can watch a video. It's pretty cool!

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Old 01-15-2013, 08:19 PM   #44
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Fiend138 View Post
Warn winches has a new portable winch for us adv guys. Check out there website you can watch a video. It's pretty cool!

Sent from my Nexus 7 using Tapatalk 2
http://www.warn.com/adventuretouring/XT17_winch.shtml

The video:
http://www.youtube.com/watch?feature...&v=d0Yr6wCBtOk
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Old 01-16-2013, 11:15 AM   #45
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At the risk of opening myself up to much derision again, here is my solution from a few years ago.

I still carry this jack in the bottom of my top case. I have probably dropped by GSA about 20 times off road in the last few years, and since I have been carrying this jack around I have never had to use it in order to pick up the bike. I will say that is seems mysterious to me why sometimes the GSA is easy to pick up and other times it is much more difficult. The time in the snow pictured below was one of the difficult times, so I do think traction has lots to do with it. I suspect it would be difficult to pick up in a field of wet clay. And I think all bets are off for most of us if we have a broken leg or seperated shoulder and have to pick the bike up solo.


Quote:
Originally Posted by SocalRob View Post
Mods - I'd like to see this in GSpot at least for a while as I think the GS/GSA's are about the only dual sports heavy enough to need one of these.

I was at DeansBMW's place in Show Low Arizona last Monday and decided to try out the new jack I recently picked up for my GSA. I have dropped the bike a couple of times and not been able to pick it up by myself, which really has me concerned about taking dirt roads when riding solo.

This was my last solo ride up Lynx Road in Angeles Crest. I was having a hell of a time trying to get the bike up when a 4x4 truck driver came by to help.


So I started thinking that I would like a light weight motorcycle equivalent to a high lift jack I've used for off road driving. I finally found this site which I thought would fit the bill:

http://snowbuddy.com/whysnowbuddy.html Edit May 2010- looks like this web site has been hacked. See post 67 of this thread for a recent phone number that I hope still works.




The owner of the site has designed these jacks for snow mobiles (snow machines for the Alaska crew). He sent me a lightweight model that he first made for snowmobiles that he decided was just a bit too lightweight for dead lifting and pushing over a snow mobile. He sent me the light weight model with a cordura bag that is great for storage, and also is great to use as a barrier between the bike and the lift cable. For a reduced price (I think about $130) I was sent the full snowmobile jack minus the foot plate and first half a bar, the foot plate being designed for snow.

As the jack is made out of 1/2 inch square bar stock (aluminum), I had Dean's welder buddy in Alpine TX (we were in Alpine over the weekend) make up a base foot and about a 10" long 3/4" steel bar with holes drilled. I figure if I need a bit more height on the jack I can get a pin to go through the holes on the 3/4" bar so the 1/2" jack bar slips in and sits a bit off the ground.

I gently let my GSA down. The bike is a R1200GS ADV with about 6 or 7 gallons of gas and the cases and top box stuffed full for a week trip, I'm guessing mybe as much as 650 lbs.







Here is the jack, actually a snowmobile jack modified with a different foot assy by Don Holms (great welder) at Starsovertexas in Alpine Texas.



The best results were hooking its attaching loop to the cylinder crash bars, which Dean figured out.









After figuring out the best way to place the jack I was able to ratchet the bike up without too much effort.







Sucess.



A happy man, able to pick up my loaded ADV by himself. When the bike was laying down in the dirt, I could not even budge it the slightest with any convential method.



The jack worked great using the Adventure tank/engine bar as a lift point. Dean helped me figure out that the best lift point for a GSA is towards the front, and by using the tank bar you get a moment arm off the centerline of the bike.

Use the right lift point, use the jack carefully and correctly, and it was pretty easy to get the bike up to a point where I could push the bike the rest of the way up using the butt to seat, hand on bar end and passenger handle (the way the woman rider has people pick up bikes in the video floating around the web).

I think even with some injury it would be possible to get the GSA up with this jack. I have not tried it, but the hand grip (handle bar) might also be a good lift point. Also, I did not have to take the cases off the bike to lighten it up. I'm sure I had 100 lbs in cases and contents, and about a half tank of gas. You have to be a stronger than average guy to pick up a GSA single handedly even when pretty empty, much less with a load.

The jack inside its cordura case will fit in a GSA top box, although it has to be diagonal in the box. I believe the jack bars are 15 inches.

The guy making the jacks is sort of out of the business and is selling off his stock. If this is of an interest I would check it out sooner than later. BTW, I turned down the jack seller's offer for any deals on my jack if others buy, I just wanted to figure something out. The one thing I do not like about the GSA is that I no longer felt comfortable travelling on dirt in back country by myself. This jack cures this problem. For that, its a cheap $150 or so.
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