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Old 01-17-2013, 06:10 AM   #16
cobrat
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Before I bought my new F250, I was shopping the used SD market and found several very nice examples of the '06 and '07 vintage that were in your price range. The 5.4 gas engines are solid, the transmissions also. Not particularly powerful, but get the job done.
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Old 01-17-2013, 06:17 AM   #17
Gummee!
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ducnut View Post
Or, a completely stock Superduty 4X4 with a 7.3L Powerstroke and service records.
That mythical beast?! Good luck!

I'll second the diesel recommendation. There's something to be said for having more truck than you need. Actually, there's lots of things to be said for having more truck than you need. Bigger brakes, stouter running gear, etc etc etc.

On road trips, I'd get 20-22 in my PSD if I kept my foot out of it. 14-17 around town. My truck had 4.11s in the back and was geared to tow at 55mph. Anything over 62-65 and it wasn't happy any more. Towing the ex's Camaro with a GS-Adv (and packed with all our worldly possessions) in the bed I'd get 10-12 at 65mph with the cruising control set.

Last time I went XC it was in a gasser 2500 Chevy. At 75-80 the dash display said 11-12 with a dirt bike in the bed.

I wish they'd make a diesel 1/2ton. ...sadly, I don't see that happening any time soon.

Good luck!

M
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Old 01-17-2013, 06:18 AM   #18
Yooper_Bob
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I have a 16' enclosed v-nose tadem axle snowmobile trailer that I pulled with my 2004 GMC 2500HD 4X4 Crewcab (gas) for the past 8 years.

Just got a new (to me) 2011 Tundra Crewmax 4X4 with the 5.7.

The Tundra blows away the crappy GMC away when it comes to towing my trailer. The Tundra has way more power/torque than the GMC ever had. Pulls the trailer with ease...plus, the Tundra's 6 speed transmission is much better at keeping the engine in the "sweet spot".

The GMC was constantly shifting, and would rev up to redline trying to make some of the hills I regularly drive...the Tundra pulls the trailer up the same hills with much less changing of gears, and with much more ease.

My vote would be get the Tundra!
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Old 01-17-2013, 06:18 AM   #19
Grreatdog
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Our Titan 4x4 crew cab is definitely a gas hog. It hasn't been bad on reliability. It has been to the shop a few times but never anything major. Mostly cooling system issues. But the damned thing uses more gas than our E-350 van. It mostly sits in the parking lot because it costs so much to run.

By far our 08 and 09 F-150's have been the best trucks in our lot. Both are in commercial service five days a week hauling three guys and about a 1000 pounds of gear. Neither truck has ever had a single issue. Not one. So far nothing but routine maintenance and one headlight bulb.

Our next full size work truck will be another F-150. I don't even see the point in the Eco-boost much less diesel unless your trailer is crazy heavy. The small V8's in our F-150's get the job done with no fuss. Granted they aren't heavily loaded in daily use. But they pull my 4000 pound boat like it isn't even back there.

For the company, Toyotas are not a consideration due to price. We can pick up nice white commercial F-150's for way, way less money than a Tundra. No matter how good they are we just aren't paying that premium. As for myself...... two 4Runners and a 4x4 pickup.
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Old 01-17-2013, 06:25 AM   #20
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I have an 08 Ford F250 SuperDuty 4WD with the 6.4 diesel. It's used exclusively to pull a 30' heavy gooseneck trailer. It's been a good truck and pulls well. I did buy a factory extended warranty as the repair cost, if need, are very high.
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Old 01-17-2013, 07:23 AM   #21
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Are you referencing engine RPM or Turbo RPM, all turbos spin fast that is how they work. The Ecoboost isn't particularly a high-rpm engine it produces power very similarly to a Hemi.

Check it here. http://www.edmunds.com/car-reviews/t...no-tested.html

I had a 300ZX TT that I dogged the SHIT out of for 125,000 miles when I sold it. I never had any other issues than burning up tires and beating up suspension parts. I only really ever had it tuned a bit, it was all stock in the drivetrain.


Yes, the turbos.
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Old 01-17-2013, 08:33 AM   #22
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I'm going to expand on the trailer comparison. I'm using Haulmark, as an example, as they have a wide variety and are steel-based like what most people buy.

5'X8'X5'6" is 935lbs wiwth a GVWR of 2980lbs.
6'X12'X6' is 1325lbs with a GVWR of 2980lbs.
7'X14'X6' tandem is 2125lbs with a GVWR of 7000lbs.

As you can see, the tandem is more than double the weight of the 5'X8'. This is not only because of the additional axle, it'll have brakes on at least one of those axles, heavier frame, heavier floor construction, and heavier ramp door (if equipped). This is so it can handle the heavier loads it's designed to carry. The additional axle means extra rolling resistance of two more tires and tire scrub when turning. The longer trailers are, usually, taller, which means more wind resistance. All this, combined, is why a tandem pulls harder.

Here's what I've experienced in leaf-spring versus torsion-spring axle. A leaf-spring axle rides far more harsh. I have a 5'X8', leaf-sprung lawn trailer that rides far more harsh and noticeable than my 7'X12' torsion-sprung box trailer, which is three times heavier. In a shorter 14' tandem, like you're considering, a leaf-sprung trailer will exert a lot more tongue weight. With a torsion-sprung trailer of that length, the axles carry their weight individually. The front axle will, generally, support the front of the trailer with the tongue jack fully raised. The US Cargo tandem I used to pull could be moved by one person. I could push down on the tongue and pivot the trailer on the front axle, to maneuver it into place. With a leaf-sprung tandem, the axles share the load, as they're connected by a rocker between the two leaf springs and the weight "pivots" on that rocker (think of a see-saw). Therefore, it'll exert a lot more tongue weight. The torsion-sprung trailer will pull much nicer and put much less load on the tow vehicle. However, because they don't exert a lot of tongue weight, they will cause a 2WD truck to get stuck much easier. I've been stuck in someone's backyard, on wet grass. We had a 5'X8' leaf-sprung, 7'X14' torsion-sprung, and 8.5'X24' leaf-sprung. I always took the torsion trailer, because it pulled so much nicer.

Many inmates are posting what their trucks have towed. That's fine. But, when you pull a trailer, everyday, as part of your living, that's a totally different scenario. There are many forums (like here) on people who tow for a living. You won't find many doing it with a gas, 1/2T truck. For longevity and profitability, it's difficult to beat what a HD diesel pickup offers. As mentioned, the older, non-EGR/emission diesels are the way to go, as they're less complex, more reliable, and more fuel efficient. I suggested a 4X4, because the Dodge and Ford are solid front axle, which means better tire wear, when being used as a tow vehicle, and less chance of getting stuck (annually, one tow bill will be more than the extra fuel useage of a 4WD). Lastly, if you're not doing your own routine maintenance, learn how. A diesel means more oil, a little more expensive filter, and a regular changing of the fuel filter (thanks to ULSD fuel). But, as mentioned, the intervals will be further apart and you're not killing the truck while using it.
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Old 01-17-2013, 08:36 AM   #23
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Avoid the Ford 250s with the 6.0 diesel like a plague. They are know for head problems, and it is not a cheap fix.

If you are thinking about a Ford diesel, here is a good link.

http://powerstrokehelp.com/7.3liter/7-3_main.asp

I have the 5.4 in mine. It is a 2004, and when I bought it the 7.3 was no longer available so I went with the gas instead.

Has 140 thousand on it, and only thing I have done on it is routine maintenance, 2 fuel pumps, an alternator, and ball joints. Other than that it is still running great.
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Old 01-17-2013, 08:47 AM   #24
ducnut
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Avoid the Ford 250s with the 6.0 diesel like a plague. They are know for head problems, and it is not a cheap fix .
For sure, a POS!!!!!

Quote:
Originally Posted by liquidsmile View Post
I have the 5.4 in mine. It is a 2004, and when I bought it the 7.3 was no longer available so I went with the gas instead..
We had one 5.4L. The only thing we did was routine maintenance and had to replace the timing cover gaskets. The two 6.8L only needed routine maintenance. The 5.4L only got 1-2mpg better mileage and was definitely working harder.

Quote:
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Has 140 thousand on it, and only thing I have done on it is routine maintenance, 2 fuel pumps, an alternator, and ball joints. Other than that it is still running great.
Ball joints are a given, on the Superduty. But, they're not hard to change.
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Old 01-17-2013, 11:59 AM   #25
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With your budget I would rule out diesels as they will have a million miles and run into the ground. My dads had a few f250 with the5.4 and its no power house but will get the job done.
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Old 01-17-2013, 12:17 PM   #26
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I had a lb7 duramax with 200 k that was reasonably easy on the wallet. I sold it because the injectors worried me and the repair bill is huge. I probably got 18 mpg running a tune and being easy on it. Sold it to buy an fj cruiser which I liked but it got the same mpg and lost the bed etc

I wanted another truck and thought about a newer diesel but just didn't make sense with the difference in fuel prices. Around here it's an $0.80 spread. My 07 tundra gets 15.6 mpg so it's cheaper to run.

I've had my tundra for a few weeks now and it's sweet. it hauls ass very comfy and the buy in was much cheaper than a comparable diesel. Mine is the co crew cab limited with leather navigation etc.

I don't haul trailers alot so I can't comment on towing mileage. I did look at the titan briefly but didn't like the interior and I drive a lot so it was important to me. I think the tundra looks nice too.
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Old 01-17-2013, 12:34 PM   #27
Bullwinkle58
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I have an '08 4wd Titan. The axle issues were fixed in 08. I only have 65k on mine, but it's a good truck & hasnt given me any trouble. The drivetrain is solid. I liked that you can get the crew cab with a longer bed than 6 1/2' (mine is 7'3") and I can close the tailgate with 2 bikes in the bed. I have a few complaints though. The paint is not very durable...it scratches easy. There is too much plastic on the truck & the cowel in front of the windshield discolors quickly. Also the OEM brake rotors warp easily.
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Old 01-17-2013, 12:54 PM   #28
_cy_
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Originally Posted by liquidsmile View Post
Avoid the Ford 250s with the 6.0 diesel like a plague. They are know for head problems, and it is not a cheap fix.

If you are thinking about a Ford diesel, here is a good link.

http://powerstrokehelp.com/7.3liter/7-3_main.asp

I have the 5.4 in mine. It is a 2004, and when I bought it the 7.3 was no longer available so I went with the gas instead.

Has 140 thousand on it, and only thing I have done on it is routine maintenance, 2 fuel pumps, an alternator, and ball joints. Other than that it is still running great.
if you are committed to yanking a trailer a large % of your driving time. hands down go with diesel!

mid-size gas trucks suck at mileage when towing any kind of loads. extra wear and tear on a gasoline motor exceeds diesels by a mile. mileage for a 12v Cummins is 20-24 mpg... yanking a trailer loaded with 15k+ lb, 16 mpg.

pretty bias but IMHO the absolute best small truck on the road is 12v Cummins Dodge made 1994-98.5. with 1996 being the most trouble free. ask any long time Dodge dealership mechanic and they will tell you... once they sent out 96 12v Cummins... they never saw it again.

main drawback to 12v Cummins is... a low mileage mint condition 12v are like hens teeth to find. then expect to pay same as a much newer Cummins truck.

took me almost 3 years to find my 96 12v Cummins, 4x4 2500 extend cab, 5sp with 67k miles in like new condition. paid out the nose for it... best truck I've ever driven.

that was 5 years ago, now at 110k miles... besides filters, the only thing done was a full ceramic clutch I installed about 35k miles back. reason that was done was to make sure clutch could handle the very lightly modded 400hp output.

besides new full ceramic clutch ($355 Oriellys), next to zero maintenance costs for last 50k miles with my 12v Cummins.

o0pss... forgot to add $500 for factory takeoff wheelset with zero miles from a 2012 2500 Cummins truck found on Craigslist.
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Old 01-17-2013, 01:34 PM   #29
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Good luck finding a 6.4 diesel or an Ecoboost for $15~20k that is in good shape.
don't forget, the OP has a budget.
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Old 01-17-2013, 03:52 PM   #30
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The budget isn't that big of an issue. My stepdad owns a car lot and runs across ridiculous deals all the time. Passed up a cherry '08 Silverado LTZ for $8800 this summer because at that time I was hell bent on ditching the trailer and getting a Sprinter.
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