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Old 02-16-2013, 09:26 PM   #1
PeterHOz OP
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F800GS rear brake fluid gone...

Noticed that the rear brake pedal was being pushed down further than I remember a week or so ago. Today - the pedal stops against the mecahnical limit, and no fluid in the holder, so no rear brakes effectively. Anyone have the same issue? No sign of dripping of fluid in on the floor of the garage, nor anything from the quick inspection I did on the lines.

As I am not comfortable riding the bike without rear brakes I want to know how to replace fluid & get it working again so that I can get it to the dealer.

So I tried to buy the Haynes service manual online - but they will not sell it to anyone outside the US and Canada in soft copy. So not sure how to do that on a ABS model.

All help will be appreciated..

Pete - Sydney, Aus
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Old 02-16-2013, 11:19 PM   #2
Bayner
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I don't want to sound harsh, but if you don't know how to top up the fluid and bleed the brakes you're better off to not touch them.
Hopefully someone from your neck of the woods will chime in and offer to show you first hand. Brakes are not something you should be "guessing" on.
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Old 02-17-2013, 01:31 AM   #3
PeterHOz OP
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Bayner View Post
I don't want to sound harsh, but if you don't know how to top up the fluid and bleed the brakes you're better off to not touch them.
Hopefully someone from your neck of the woods will chime in and offer to show you first hand. Brakes are not something you should be "guessing" on.
Exactly why I am posting this - I don't want to guess.
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Old 02-17-2013, 01:35 AM   #4
rescueMAN
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the more problems I hear about the F800GS,,,, the less I want one!
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Old 02-17-2013, 01:53 AM   #5
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Originally Posted by rescueMAN View Post
the more problems I hear about the F800GS,,,, the less I want one!
After having one for over 4 years - with this being the only issue so far, I don't think I agree with you...
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Old 02-17-2013, 02:47 AM   #6
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BWAHAHA! Welcome to the world of Interwebz Forums. Want to find a crappy product? If there is a forum for it, it's full of crappiness about it.

Quote:
Originally Posted by rescueMAN View Post
the more problems I hear about the F800GS,,,, the less I want one!
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Old 02-17-2013, 03:38 AM   #7
rescueMAN
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True.
Looking around the various threads, there's the alternator (34,000 and it gives way), front mudguard fetching people off, valves and pistons burning out from using low grade and ethonol fuels in remote countries, now this.
Just saying
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Old 02-17-2013, 08:15 AM   #8
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Quote:
Originally Posted by rescueMAN View Post
True.
Looking around the various threads, there's the alternator (34,000 and it gives way), front mudguard fetching people off, valves and pistons burning out from using low grade and ethonol fuels in remote countries, now this.
Just saying


Read further, there are many more people happy and problem free with theirs.

The "problems" generate a lot more internet noise.
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Old 02-17-2013, 09:20 AM   #9
ebrabaek
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Quote:
Originally Posted by PeterHOz View Post
Noticed that the rear brake pedal was being pushed down further than I remember a week or so ago. Today - the pedal stops against the mecahnical limit, and no fluid in the holder, so no rear brakes effectively. Anyone have the same issue? No sign of dripping of fluid in on the floor of the garage, nor anything from the quick inspection I did on the lines.

As I am not comfortable riding the bike without rear brakes I want to know how to replace fluid & get it working again so that I can get it to the dealer.

So I tried to buy the Haynes service manual online - but they will not sell it to anyone outside the US and Canada in soft copy. So not sure how to do that on a ABS model.

All help will be appreciated..

Pete - Sydney, Aus
Lets keep this on the subject. The OP asked about the rear brakes, not how to flog the design.....
Pete.... As your brake pads wear down the calipers ( small pistons that move them as you push the brake lever) cylinders are now protruding further. The increased void is filled with more brake fluid, and you will see the level go down a little. As you replace the brake pads you squeeze the pistons in the caliper back in, and fluid returns to the reservoir. it is not something that just happens overnight, and, if that is the case with yours, I would look for a leak. Simply follow the brake line back, and look for saturated areas. Then inspect the brake disc. You can use a sheet of clean paper towel, to swipe the disc. If it has anything other that a little dust.... ie. damp.... anything indicating liquid is present, then you need to investigate further. Biggest thing here, is to look for leaks.
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Old 02-17-2013, 10:00 AM   #10
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Hey rescueMan, when you find the perfect bike to add to your perfect life, let us know and we'll buy one too.

PeterHOz, there is no mystery to bleeding the abs models. It's basically the same and I've done it numerous times. As mentioned, start with finding out where the fluid went first. No point filling a bucket with a hole in it. How much brake pad is left? If you're just looking to get it to the Dealer then it may be best to ride carefully without the rear. How far? I rarely use my rear brake on the street anyway. Keep the speed down.

A tip for the novice and experienced alike:

On both front and back brakes, the first few mm of travel on the master cylinder piston is "open loop" mode if you will. Thats why you see a spout of brake fluid going straight up into the reservoir initially. That is to bleed any air out of the cylinder before building pressure. On an empty reservoir, air is definately in the cylinder. What you do is "tickle" the lever/pedal that first bit of travel repeatedly until no more air is coming out. That way you start out with a fully primed master. Then forcefully bleed out the air at the caliper end the normal way. Air rises of course but if you blast the fluid through it will carry much of the air with it. There is an app on the BMW computer that will cycle the abs pump in a weird way to bleed itself but I've never done it to any F bike because it wasn't needed.

Good luck down there.
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Old 02-17-2013, 12:01 PM   #11
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Reaver View Post
On both front and back brakes, the first few mm of travel on the master cylinder piston is "open loop" mode if you will. Thats why you see a spout of brake fluid going straight up into the reservoir initially. That is to bleed any air out of the cylinder before building pressure. On an empty reservoir, air is definately in the cylinder. What you do is "tickle" the lever/pedal that first bit of travel repeatedly until no more air is coming out. That way you start out with a fully primed master. Then forcefully bleed out the air at the caliper end the normal way. Air rises of course but if you blast the fluid through it will carry much of the air with it. There is an app on the BMW computer that will cycle the abs pump in a weird way to bleed itself but I've never done it to any F bike because it wasn't needed.

Good luck down there.
Thanks Reaver,

I will follow this and get the brakes to a point that I feel comfortable riding it to the dealer, which is about 35 km away (have to go in city traffic so not keen to do so without brakes...)

Pete
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Old 02-17-2013, 12:12 PM   #12
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[QUOTE=Reaver;20745520]Hey rescueMan, when you find the perfect bike to add to your perfect life, let us know and we'll buy one too.

They're out there I'm sure, my Suzuki 95' 600 Bandit does a fine job of it, and 78' 600 BM, but the 800 BM I have,,,, lets see.
I'll butt out, I can see I'm getting the indoctrinated angry
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Old 02-17-2013, 12:22 PM   #13
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Not angry, just tired of the same 'ol comment. In life, one can always find a reason to not do/buy something. The true reason is usually kept hidden. No worries.

BTW, any bike with a carb is not perfect! At least not in my variable altitude life.

Ride safe.
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Old 02-17-2013, 12:32 PM   #14
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There are a lot of posts on F800 "problems". Far more posts than actual problems. , Many are posted by people like yourself who do not know what they are talking about or just want to get their jibes in. What is really annoying is haters who like to count the number of post without really reading them.

To the OP, the first thing I would look at is, are your pads worn?. Located right on top of the rotor within easy view.

If you don't know how to bleed a brake. first add some fluid. Pump the brake pedal a few times and hold the peddle down. On top of the brake slave cylinder at the disc, there is a nipple with a nut on it. There is a rubber cover on it. Open it up while applying pressure on the peddle. Then tighten it up and repump. Repeat as needed.

As long as the bleed nipple is closed while pumping you should begin to feel the brake pedal returning to normal. Once that happens apply pressure and see if the pedal remains firm.

If it does, it should do to get you to the dealer.

I have never had ABS, I thought on the older BMW's there was another cylinder for ABS? Where is the pump on this bike?
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itsatdm screwed with this post 02-17-2013 at 12:52 PM
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Old 02-17-2013, 01:47 PM   #15
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+1 on what Ebrabaek said!

As my pads wore out in the back, the fluid level dropped significantly. I replaced the pads, and the level went back up to the max level. Simple test for you: go out to your bike and separate the pad away from the rotor (using your fingers if you are a man, or gently with a screwdriver if you keep tampons in your purse, next to your vagisil). Look and see if the level increased in the cylinder If yes, you could be alright, and coming up on a needed pad change. If no, you may have a leak...but I'm no mechanic...nor do I have any mechanical ability.
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