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Old 01-29-2013, 06:57 AM   #16
Bill Harris
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Oh noes, Paul...



I'm with HWG on this-- a faint coat of silcone sealant both sides. Belt-and-suspenders-- may not be absolutely necessary, but it doesn't hurt. And the silly-cone serves as a release compound-- the old gasket peels off with no scraping or cussing.

Tighten the oilpan bolts with a short 3" 'palm ratchet', tighten x-pattern starting in the middle and working outwards. Recheck after a couple of heating-cooling cycles.

Of courser, YMMV. Ride safe and keep the shiny side up.

--Bill
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Old 01-29-2013, 09:59 AM   #17
Airhead Wrangler
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Mine uses "over-torque-proof" fasteners aka flathead screws:



I used a thin smear of Dreibond on both sides of BOTH gaskets and assembled it, let it set up for a bit, and then torqued it, going around a few times.
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Airhead Wrangler screwed with this post 01-29-2013 at 10:49 AM
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Old 01-29-2013, 10:19 AM   #18
DoktorT
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I decided to put the 81 on pan on my earlier RS. New pan, new gasket, clean and dry. After setting the bolts after a few rides, all seemed OK but within a few weeks I could see it was weeping more than it should.

Next maintenance inspection I pulled the pan. Flange looked fine and proved dead flat, but you could see the image of the final finishing process. I hit the flange with some 400grit and a palm sander. It now was flat matte homogenouse. Put it back on dry. Issue resolved. No weeping at all.

Next time you have the pan off, just go ahead and do treat the surface to insure a perfect seal.

Then let the engine drip overnight or several hours and mop it all up around the lower flange. Now take a flat file and just stroke it around the perimeter enough to see if highlights appear around any stressed holes. Proof positive of over tightening at some times in the past. Takes nothing but the right sized piece of wood and abrasive to make that a perfect surface again as well.

Refining these details is what is meant by enhanced specifications. You spend the extra time to make things better than the factory specs could. You tend to get overall better results than stock in this way.

Rare is the mechanic that will demand from his client the extra 20 minutes or so to do this better work for such as a leaky pan gasket replacement. My clients always knew it they wanted cheaper, it was available everywhere. They came to me because I resolved long standing problems with techniques as simple as abrasives and time, efficient and effective with skill. Now his garage baby doesn't drip anymore.

Refined results can only come from refined procedures. If you can do these things yourself, you can make the machine better in many ways as you do your scheduled maintenance and repairs.
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Old 01-29-2013, 10:44 AM   #19
craydds
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Quote:
Originally Posted by DoktorT View Post
Rare is the mechanic that will demand from his client the extra 20 minutes or so to do this better work for such as a leaky pan gasket replacement.

Refined results can only come from refined procedures. If you can do these things yourself, you can make the machine better in many ways as you do your scheduled maintenance and repairs.
++1 !!! Methinks it rare to find anyone that will take the extra time to do a little extra work to make it RIGHT. I will re-do something if necessary until it is RIGHT ON.
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Old 01-29-2013, 11:10 AM   #20
headtube
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I use Hylomar. It works very well on all gasket surfaces where oil pressure exists. It does not dry but stays tacky (non-setting). This makes it very easy to clean up with rubbing alcohol the next time you disassemble.

If your oil pan is lightly warped you can "glass it". A large piece of flat glass with some 400 / 600 grit wet paper taped firmly down is a good base to start sanding that oil pan flat. Lightly press the pan in a figure 8 motion onto the paper. You'll soon see the high / low marks on the pan. Continue to sand till the entire piece is flat. This will not take long. Just remember... keep that pan flat when sanding.
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Old 01-29-2013, 11:50 AM   #21
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I forgot to mention in my advice that I do use silicon on the degreased threads of the bolt where the threads goes all the way through into the sump. Other than that, I think dry gaskets and using a inch pound torque wrench is the most refined method regardless of cost or time.
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Old 01-29-2013, 12:02 PM   #22
craydds
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I do use silicon on the degreased threads of the bolt where the threads goes all the way through into the sump.
Do you think teflon tape might work to help seal those bolts?
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Old 01-29-2013, 01:01 PM   #23
supershaft
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I use liquid tape on final drive threaded rings with real good results. I have never had the need to try it on the sump bolt. Silicon has worked perfect for me so far. I have seen so many techniques not work that when I come across one that does I usually just stick with it.
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Old 01-29-2013, 01:22 PM   #24
craydds
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Originally Posted by Airhead Wrangler View Post
Mine uses "over-torque-proof" fasteners aka flathead screws:



I used a thin smear of Dreibond on both sides of BOTH gaskets and assembled it, let it set up for a bit, and then torqued it, going around a few times.
Nice bike, AW. All is very clean. I like the Enduralast.
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Old 01-29-2013, 02:31 PM   #25
Airhead Wrangler
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Nice bike, AW. All is very clean. I like the Enduralast.
Thanks, but it's only clean because it hasn't been run yet. It's never going to be that clean again.
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Old 01-29-2013, 03:26 PM   #26
supershaft
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Thanks, but it's only clean because it hasn't been run yet. It's never going to be that clean again.
I'm a big fan AW but don't let me down now! I'm beggin' ya not to be yet another GS rider that never washes his bike. Real dirt bikes get washed. Real dirt bikes get maintained. You can't properly maintain a dirty bike. Go to any national or even amateur MX and look at the bikes before the race. They are spotless. Every weekend! Not washing your your bike so as to I guess prove that you have actually ridden it in the dirt ruins it before it's time on numerous different fronts.
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Old 01-29-2013, 04:18 PM   #27
robtg
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I'm a big fan AW but don't let me down now! I'm beggin' ya not to be yet another GS rider that never washes his bike. Real dirt bikes get washed. Real dirt bikes get maintained. You can't properly maintain a dirty bike. Go to any national or even amateur MX and look at the bikes before the race. They are spotless. Every weekend! Not washing your your bike so as to I guess prove that you have actually ridden it in the dirt ruins it before it's time on numerous different fronts.

I agree with that 100%. I have found broken frames, cracked cases, and all kinds of problems just by washing a bike after being ridden off road.
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Old 01-29-2013, 06:12 PM   #28
Airhead Wrangler
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Don't get me wrong, I don't plan to cover it in crud and leave it. I wash off loose dirt and grime, but I don't get too anal about polishing every nook and cranny - not as some kind of proof that it gets ridden, more that I just don't have the time. I fully agree with what you're getting at though.
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Old 01-29-2013, 06:59 PM   #29
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Man you guys are anal. It's British Motor Works, right? Well British bikes leak, end of story.

Oh and Stagehand to the bike-wash station courtesy phone, plz


After years of futzing w/ all the sealant solutions mentioned here, i went w/ ol' Snowbum using a dry/new/stock sump gasket and wrist-torque w/ a 1/4 inch short ratchet. Bone dry on 2 motors that are ridden in dirt heat cycles
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Old 01-29-2013, 07:00 PM   #30
supershaft
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Yea! A lot of people let the crud cake. And then want me to work on it. Not only does it need to be cleaned before it can come apart but how long has it been since it has been looked at? You shouldn't let a bike go that long with out looking at it. The bike I mean, not the crud.
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