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Old 06-06-2013, 08:22 PM   #76
easygojoe
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Location: Beautiful Southern Oregon
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Puke Over the Siskiyou's and back

A little two wheeled therapy, over the siskiyou's and back on dirt. To check out a free Forest Service Campground I had heard about. It was on the other side of the mountains (and the other side of the state line for that matter), but it gave me the opportunity to try out my new Wolfman enduro bag, my 12v charger, and my new AGV sport riding pants. They all passed the test. The bummer was that I forgot to grab my GPS. I had to rely on Google Maps on my phone which I highly DO NOT RECOMMEND. Once you lose Data, you are screwed.




Anyway, the little red beast did well, even on the seven or ten miles of Interstate I was forced to ride.


Forgive the terrible grainy cell phone pic of Mt.Shasta. It's awesome, the pic is not.

I love the siskiyou Crest. One way the Applegate, the other the Klamath. Here is the Pacific Crest Trail, one way Canada, one way Mexico.


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Old 06-07-2013, 05:05 AM   #77
callison
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EJK Update

My experience using the EJK so far as been nothing but positive.

One of the sales reps sent me an email asking for feedback on the unit and I mentioned, inspired by the unit LostRider is running on his LRP, that it would be nice if I could switch between a fuel efficient map and a performance map on the fly.

The rep replied with the following:
Quote:
I talked with our techs about your questions/concerns. We have come up with a couple of possible options for you. First, let’s address the desire for better fuel economy while maintaining performance. The EJK Gen 3 fuel controller that you have has what’s called a “stealth circuit” built into it. What this means is, if you disconnect the ground wire, you will be sending a stock ECU signal through the controller. What we think would work best for you would be to hook up a switch to your ground wire. This would allow you to switch the controller off while riding to the trail. When you get to the trail, flip the switch on and you will have all of the performance you want, back and in your control.
This is good news for me since the western Carolina mountains about two hours away via the back roads and finding a place to refuel in the national forests can be problematic.

Cory
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Old 06-07-2013, 06:04 AM   #78
tilliejacques
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Quote:
Originally Posted by easygojoe View Post
I love the siskiyou Crest. One way the Applegate, the other the Klamath. Here is the Pacific Crest Trail, one way Canada, one way Mexico.

as you say you can take the Pacific Crest Trail to Canada or Mexico, but from the trail sign in your pic, only hiking or horseback? what a bummer!

but very nice to hear the LRP did well!

cheers
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Old 07-06-2013, 01:31 PM   #79
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Lost Rider View Post
Can you tell me more about those handguards and folding mirrors?

Also, what do I need to put in a fenderbag like yours in order to fix a flat? I like the idea.
Total noob to off roading. I have a Kawi ER6n that I ride around town, but don't know much about working on bikes and fixing flats ect.

I just put $500 down as a deposit on a CRF250L. The dealer said there were 10 people ahead of me on "a list" to buy CRF250L's. I asked him, "did any of them put money down?" He said, "no." I asked, "would putting down a $500 deposit get me the next one through your door?" He said, "yes." So I slapped down my VISA right on the spot. hahaha....

What are the FIRST couple things I should buy, if you could boil it down to the essentials to "get started?"

I'm thinking, handguards and fenderbag for handling flat tires...

What are your thoughts?

greg1 screwed with this post 07-06-2013 at 01:42 PM
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Old 07-06-2013, 02:07 PM   #80
Avi8tor
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Quote:
Originally Posted by greg1 View Post
Can you tell me more about those handguards and folding mirrors?

Also, what do I need to put in a fenderbag like yours in order to fix a flat? I like the idea.
Total noob to off roading. I have a Kawi ER6n that I ride around town, but don't know much about working on bikes and fixing flats ect.

I just put $500 down as a deposit on a CRF250L. The dealer said there were 10 people ahead of me on "a list" to buy CRF250L's. I asked him, "did any of them put money down?" He said, "no." I asked, "would putting down a $500 deposit get me the next one through your door?" He said, "yes." So I slapped down my VISA right on the spot. hahaha....

What are the FIRST couple things I should buy, if you could boil it down to the essentials to "get started?"

I'm thinking, handguards and fenderbag for handling flat tires...

What are your thoughts?
Those are highway dirtbike hand guards. Quite speedy, but very nice. I bought mostly for the switch and outlet mounts on the center clamp. If you want to keep it real, just get yourself some Cycra or Tusk hand guards and call it good. The bike doesn't really "need" anything to ride it off road. Hand guards and skid plate and some kind of bag for gear is what I would start with.
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Old 07-07-2013, 11:57 PM   #81
Woody2627
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Quote:
Originally Posted by greg1 View Post
Can you tell me more about those handguards and folding mirrors?

Also, what do I need to put in a fenderbag like yours in order to fix a flat? I like the idea.
Total noob to off roading. I have a Kawi ER6n that I ride around town, but don't know much about working on bikes and fixing flats ect.

I just put $500 down as a deposit on a CRF250L. The dealer said there were 10 people ahead of me on "a list" to buy CRF250L's. I asked him, "did any of them put money down?" He said, "no." I asked, "would putting down a $500 deposit get me the next one through your door?" He said, "yes." So I slapped down my VISA right on the spot. hahaha....

What are the FIRST couple things I should buy, if you could boil it down to the essentials to "get started?"

I'm thinking, handguards and fenderbag for handling flat tires...

What are your thoughts?
13t front sprocket. :
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Old 07-15-2013, 04:24 PM   #82
easygojoe
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Woody2627 View Post
13t front sprocket. :
That 13t front sprocket is on my list.
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Old 07-15-2013, 04:30 PM   #83
Kennon
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@greg1

Zeta make good hand guards with fold out mirrors.
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Old 08-06-2013, 10:12 AM   #84
Wanderlustking
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Figured i'd bring this back to life.

So i was planning on posting much of anything atleast untill i was done with my trip but lots or rain and some flooding has grounded me here in Missouri for the day.

Im taking a pretty long trip from the 4 corners in Colorado all the way back to new york city on the CRF. with some decent detours along the way.

her is Eugene in all there glory. by the continental divide


What ive done is basically just add
wolfman luggage racks (both side and top)
universal windscreen from Amazon (spitfire i believe)
Zeta bar risers and bark busters
Drc replacement break light/license plate mount.
Seat concepts saddle.
An for luggage i used a wolfmen dry duffle medium (about 40L) and two pelican 1430 cases (under 20L) i got on the cheap.

Other than that the bike is completely stock as i got it.
I've got just under 3k on the odometer right now and 1k of that has been the last 3 days riding.

My only huge want (besides the personal ergonomic stuff like larger foot pegs and sheepskin) for the bike would be a larger gas tank. the 2 gallon fillups are really cutting into my travel time. An i really dont think the IMS 3 gallon would be much of an improvement for the cost. What i would really like some one to make would be a 5ish gallon tank like IMS makes for the WR.

Other than that the bike has sailed along with no problems and does pretty decent in the dirt considering the weight.
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Old 08-07-2013, 04:03 AM   #85
easygojoe
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That's a nice looking rig!
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Old 08-11-2013, 11:49 AM   #86
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Quote:
Originally Posted by greg1 View Post
Can you tell me more about those handguards and folding mirrors?

Also, what do I need to put in a fenderbag like yours in order to fix a flat? I like the idea.
Total noob to off roading. I have a Kawi ER6n that I ride around town, but don't know much about working on bikes and fixing flats ect.

I just put $500 down as a deposit on a CRF250L. The dealer said there were 10 people ahead of me on "a list" to buy CRF250L's. I asked him, "did any of them put money down?" He said, "no." I asked, "would putting down a $500 deposit get me the next one through your door?" He said, "yes." So I slapped down my VISA right on the spot. hahaha....

What are the FIRST couple things I should buy, if you could boil it down to the essentials to "get started?"

I'm thinking, handguards and fenderbag for handling flat tires...

What are your thoughts?


Like stated those are HDB hand guards, virtually indestructible and worth the investment IMO. I've broken various other brand guards, namely the mounts that clamp onto the bars type so in the end the HDB would have be cheaper to start with.
Add in the integrated mirrors and turn signals and it kills 3 birds with one stone plus having a place to put switches or other doodads is the bonus.
Hand guards, and a skid plate are a given, along with some sort of folding mirrors since the OEM ones have a good chance of getting broken or breaking other things like the perch or twisting the levers out of the protection of the guards and breaking them when you go down. Putting on 1 1/8 handlebars using adaptors is also a good idea since the OEM bars are thin and weak. We use ROX risers to adapt from 7/8 to 1 1/8, which also puts the bars in a far more comfortable position for standing, what you should be doing when riding dirt. We have Protaper KX High bars, ordered with the HDB kit with the inserts already mounted. Lots of choices for bars though, and the HDB kit comes with what you need to mount the bar end inserts.
A 13t sprocket also helps quite a bit for trail riding without making the unusable on the highway Rim locks are wise if you want to air down the tires (like you should) when on dirt. Air back up when on pavement to help your tire last longer. Be sure to balance the wheels though once you add rim locks, highway riding can become unstable or annoying with vibrations from the unbalanced weight.

A radiator guard is also a wise investment both to keep from getting stranded on the trail or a costly replacement of the Radiator.

As a new DS rider inevitably the bike will get dropped so besides getting it setup to fit YOU (risers, bars, seat, what ever makes you comfy) some protection and changes to the weak points that will take the brunt of the hits is good in the long run instead of breaking stuff.
It seems like I listed a lot, but with these investments to the weak/vulnerable points of the bike it will be as strong as it can get and take lots of use, most bikes need the similar protection so it's not really a Honda problem, just the way it is when it comes to DS riding. This comes from my experiences and mistakes in the past as I learned what I/we needed, of course YRMV.


The fender bag is a Moose racing one, you'll want to cut a few knotches in the fender to keep it from sliding forward. I can post up more pics if needed. Besides a tube patch kit I keep a 21" tube (can be used in rear wheel temporarily) and a Slime Top Off air pump along with some Motion Pro tire spoons, one of which is the 24mm combo wrench to remove the rear tire, the other is a 12mm combo to loosen the pinch bolts on the forks. Add in a 17mm wrench and standard tire lever to complete the kit. I also carry an Enduro Star Trail Stand to make things easier while fixing a flat on the trail since many places we ride wont have wood or even rocks to prop up the bike.
You'll need to swap the plug on the Slime pump, a very common way would be to get a SAE harness wired direct to the battery and then get another SAE plug in the towing section of any autoparts store to put on the pump, cutting the cigarette plug off. You'll also be able to use a battery tender or jump start your or other bikes through this plug if needed.

Having the right tools is only half the battle though, knowing how to use them is the other important part. Once you get your kit sorted I recommend researching the how-to's that are all over ADV and find a method that works for you, practicing with the tools you carry on the trail at home is time well spent, it gets much faster with practice. I change all our tires with my trail tools at home all the time to improve my skills and test out my kit regularly. It's easier to have a dealer change them, but nothing is learned that way. Changing a tube/tire in 10 minutes becomes easy.


Don't forget proper dirt riding protection for yourself while you're at it if you haven't already, lots of threads in Equipment to scour...

Good luck!







Wanderlustking:

Awesome to see folks out traveling on the LRP, I'm envious!

Looking forward to more info on how the whole trip went for you, I agree a much bigger tank is needed for ADV riding, 3 gallons isn't going to cut it, 5 would be great. Ride on and stay safe!
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Old 08-12-2013, 09:05 AM   #87
callison
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I have to agree with Lost Rider. Doing your own maintenance is a great idea. I'm sitting at around 6k miles right now, the weather has been less than stellar around my area so I've taken the opportunity to tear the my bike down, recheck the valve clearance, service linkage/swing arm, check seals and everything else the manual recommends at the 5K service. Here's what she looks like right now while I'm waiting for new valve shims to arrive, please excuse the mess, I'd rather ride than clean my garage:



I've mounted and balanced my own tires, getting ready to replace the front one if anyone has any recommendations, I've got a D606 on the back right now.

The HDB hand guards are top notch, I ordered the folding mirrors with mine and couldn't be happier. My bars are CR High Bend.

While going over the bike I noticed that I bent the lower portion of the radiator, not sure if you can tell in the picture. I'll be placing an order for a guard in the next couple days. Aside from that, everything seems to be holding up fairly well. I've saved several hundred dollars doing all the work myself and have a good understanding of how to fix the bike should the unfortunate happen while out on the trail.

Being self sufficient is the goal for me, I don't want to have to rely on anyone or be a pain in anyone's ass when I'm riding with a group.
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Old 08-12-2013, 10:11 AM   #88
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Right on Cory!
You nailed it on the head besides saving money gaining intimate knowledge of your bike is priceless when stuck on the trail!

I need to take the rear end off and grease it up too...
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Old 08-16-2013, 10:00 PM   #89
EEKAMOUSE
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Callison MT-21 I love it in combo with the D606 rear JMO.
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Old 08-22-2013, 09:11 AM   #90
roadspirit
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Hello ADVers

What are your opinions about choosing the Little Red for a big one, a long long overland trip? For months and for thousands of miles away from home? Like going from Europe to the whole tour of Central Asia, from Siberia and Mongolia, to the Stans, to India and Nepal and back ?

Apart from adding all necessary farkles, the main things in question here are ease of DIY maintenance and reliability in the long run.
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