ADVrider

Go Back   ADVrider > Bikes > Orange Crush > Ridiculous streetbikes with 6 CPUs and too much horsepower (1050/1190/1290cc)
User Name
Password
Register Inmates Photos Site Rules Search Today's Posts Mark Forums Read

Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread Display Modes
Old 03-27-2015, 06:53 AM   #1
Tragic Overlander OP
Adventurer
 
Tragic Overlander's Avatar
 
Joined: Aug 2008
Location: Rocky Mountains
Oddometer: 226
Building my 1190R and first ride impressions

After owning 2 KTM 990’s in the past 7 years, and putting on around 60k on them, it was time to upgrade to a new bike. I had absolutely loved both 990’s, and so it was a no brainer to get another KTM. I have been watching with great interest the progress of the 1190 since its release in 2013, and had always thought that I would buy one, but give them a couple of years to sort out the inevitable bugs. On paper, the 1190 seemed to me to be a great design, and most things I had read about them have indicated that is a good bike.Thank you to all those that have contributed your thoughts and experiences - as usual, this forum provides a huge wealth of knowledge and information.



Of course, it is not perfect, and lets face it, all big adventure bikes are a bit of a compromise. There is no doubt that there have been some issues with this bike over the last couple of years, and supposedly KTM has made a little progress with the 2015 model. The only issue that I am really concerned about is the air filter – which I am not convinced has been rectified in the latest model.




I tend to do quite a lot of off road touring quite often with fairly technical riding (lots of rocks and sand), so the choice between the standard and the R model was easy. So I am now the proud owner of a 2015 1190R. My last big bike was a 2011 990R which was set up perfectly for what I wanted – practical protection, flexible luggage options, dialed in suspension, and good ergonomics. Learning about what suits me over the last few years, I have set about building the best bike that I can in the last couple of weeks.
I am focused on 3 main criteria initially:

Protection
Performance / Reliability
Ergonomics / luggage.

Since I have been buried in snow for the winter, I had a bit of time to work on the bike. Here is a list of stuff that has gone on the bike so far:

BRP Steering damper mounting kit (damper borrowed from old bike)
Black Dog Cycle Works - platform LOW footpegs for KTM V2
KTM Heated grips
Fuzeblock FZ-1
Altrider skid plate - black
OEM luggage racks
KTM storage box
GPS Mount bracket
Touratech ss headlight guard
Akropovic slip on pipe
Sidestand switch removal
Rottweiler air intake system - stage 3 kit, and pre-filter,
Rottweiler SAS emissions removal kit – stage 3
Black Dog Cycle Works radiator guard
Black Dog side stand footprint extension
Altrider rear brake master cylinder guard
Fork socks
Fork bleeder valves
OEM 16t countershaft sprocket
Black Dog Cycle Works Oil cooler protection
Altrider rear luggage rack
Kriega Overlander 60 soft pannier system (with 1 gal fuel and 1 gal water Rotopax)
Flex Bars
Cycra hand guards
Double Take mirrors
Cyclops LED replacement headlight bulbs.
Baja Squadron LED driving lights.
Slavens Mule cool rear brake cooler
Slavens High fender adaptor
KTM 2012 690 super moto front fender
Wolfman tank bag

Yes, it is an obscene amount of money to make an already expensive bike work well for my needs, but I justify it (to myself anyway) by hoping I will get many years of trouble free riding…..blah, blah, wish, hope….

There are a couple of other items that I will tackle after I have ridden it on a few big rides:
Suspension: I suspect that I will at least have to go up a spring rate or two (to handle my rather large carcass) and will then decide if I need to re-valve as well.
Seat: I am a big fan of Renazco seats and will probably end up asking James to build me one for this bike, but I want to see how the stock seat goes for a while first.
Tires: The bike came stock with TKC 80 tires front and rear. I have always hated these tires on my 990’s and swore that I would never again use them. This being said, I have lots of friends that love them – so I will give them a go and see if I can be swayed.
Wheels: I am not convinced that this tubeless set up will work well for me as I tend to do a lot of off road riding. I am concerned about the rims as well. It is really hard for me to justify another $2k on a dedicated set of tubed off road wheels – but I am considering it. Again, I’ll just see how it goes for the first year.

Let the farkling begin. Where to start? mmmm……
__________________
You know you're out of your depth when your GPS tells you "after 300 feet, stop and let me off!"
TAT 2009 http://advrider.com/forums/showthread.php?t=527358
ALASKA 2011: http://advrider.com/forums/showthread.php?t=707925
HOW 2013: http://advrider.com/forums/showthread.php?t=930423
Tragic Overlander is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-27-2015, 08:08 AM   #2
Tragic Overlander OP
Adventurer
 
Tragic Overlander's Avatar
 
Joined: Aug 2008
Location: Rocky Mountains
Oddometer: 226
I began with wheeling this beast onto my lift. Of course, I spent quite a while just looking at it and drooling. IMHO It is a really nice bike!




Enough procrastinating. Started by switching out the countershaft sprocket for a 16. This required a bit of work as the stock 17 is very snug and quite difficult to remove. The 16 fits in quite easily (sorry – I forgot to take pics of this step).

I then removed the fuel tank. This is not as easy as it should be – it’s like a bloody puzzle. Not thinking too much about, I just threw the 47,372 screws, bolts and miscellaneous plastic pieces into a bag. Then it dawned on me that I am going to have a hard time remembering where everything goes and in what order. Oh well…..I’ll worry about that later. I disconnected the fuel pump power, fuel lines and breather pipes, then removed the tank. I thought quick access to the 990 air filter was a PIA – but this is not going to be easy either.






With the tank off, it became pretty evident to me that KTM have spent a good amount of time redesigning the bike to make maintenance a bit easier. The fact that there is only 1 fuel tank helps. Changing the oil will be much easier. Radiator access, clutch access etc is also easier. The battery and fuses are up high and also have much easier access. Despite this though, the wiring and multitude of sensors is quite daunting for someone as “electronically challenged” as myself.


Running out of time for tonight, I started with some easy stuff. I removed the OEM silencer and replaced it with a shiny new Akropovic slip on. This unit looks to be of high quality, and comes with a fancy carbon fibre heat shield. I had another Akro on my 990R (2 into 1) and never had any problems. I did notice that there is a bit of weight saving with this unit, although I did not take the time to weigh either of them. I am also expecting a slight performance gain from this new pipe. No problems removing the old unit, or fitting the new unit.






Since I was working on the rear, I also installed the OEM luggage racks. I decided to go with the OEM racks so I could use them with either the new Kriega soft luggage or hard bags (possibly in the future for bigger road rides). I realize that this is a topic that has been discussed over hundreds of pages, but I really like riding with soft bags on off road rides. Once I worked out the pieces, it all bolted up easily. I used red loctite on all bolts.






Not sure if this is really practical or just bling, I also bought and installed a little storage tray which fits over the pipe between the luggage rack and the body work. It appears to be a handy device located in an otherwise useless waste of space, but I am a little wary about how hot it might get. Only one way to find out.
__________________
You know you're out of your depth when your GPS tells you "after 300 feet, stop and let me off!"
TAT 2009 http://advrider.com/forums/showthread.php?t=527358
ALASKA 2011: http://advrider.com/forums/showthread.php?t=707925
HOW 2013: http://advrider.com/forums/showthread.php?t=930423
Tragic Overlander is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-27-2015, 08:36 AM   #3
ABuck99
0.0
 
ABuck99's Avatar
 
Joined: Feb 2009
Location: Georgia
Oddometer: 606
Hmmm that looks useful. I'm looking forward to breakfasts cooked on your new portable cook top on the IDBDR this fall. Could you add to the menu western omelets, and pancakes & bacon please.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Tragic Overlander View Post


Not sure if this is really practical or just bling, I also bought and installed a little storage tray which fits over the pipe between the luggage rack and the body work. It appears to be a handy device located in an otherwise useless waste of space, but I am a little wary about how hot it might get. Only one way to find out.
__________________
KTM: 06 KTM950S & 10 KTM450EXC
ABuck99 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-27-2015, 08:39 AM   #4
Tragic Overlander OP
Adventurer
 
Tragic Overlander's Avatar
 
Joined: Aug 2008
Location: Rocky Mountains
Oddometer: 226
Quote:
Originally Posted by ABuck99 View Post
Hmmm that looks useful. I'm looking forward to breakfasts cooked on your new portable cook top on the IDBDR this fall. Could you add to the menu western omelets, and pancakes & bacon please.
Certainly sir! I am trying to work out how to bolt on an espresso machine
__________________
You know you're out of your depth when your GPS tells you "after 300 feet, stop and let me off!"
TAT 2009 http://advrider.com/forums/showthread.php?t=527358
ALASKA 2011: http://advrider.com/forums/showthread.php?t=707925
HOW 2013: http://advrider.com/forums/showthread.php?t=930423
Tragic Overlander is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-27-2015, 08:56 AM   #5
Tragic Overlander OP
Adventurer
 
Tragic Overlander's Avatar
 
Joined: Aug 2008
Location: Rocky Mountains
Oddometer: 226
Now onto the air box. I have been reading with interest all the issues about the OEM system and blown motors. Despite assurances that the 2015 air box has been reinforced and sealed at the factory, I was not willing to risk it. I decided to buy a Rottweiler stage 3 kit which included a new base plate adaptor, duct bracket, open style filter, rear velocity stack, and fuel dongles. I did not know anything about the Powercell unit until after I had purchased the Rott, but I am happy with my purchase.





The install was relatively easy, and the video on the Rottweiler site was helpful. Once the OEM air box was removed, installing the new base plate was fairly simple. The newer plastic heat deflector fit nicely, but it did take a bit of time for me to work out exactly how it fit – did I mention that I am not very smart?


About half way through the process, I started the SAS removal and canisterectomy. It was quite shocking how much stuff can be removed.



Of course, I was very thankful that Rottweiler had done all the work and added fuel dongles etc because the ECU has so many sensors, that figuring it out yourself would be a long and arduous endeavor.



Removing the charcoal canister from the tail creates a nice space for tool and electrical storage that is easily accessed.



Here came the tricky bit. As part of the stage 3 kit, some new tubing is included for synchronizing the throttle bodies – something I thought might be beneficial at a later date. The video on the Rottweiler site shows the process of how to install these tubes onto a RC8 street bike, but conveniently skips right by how to access the breather nipples on both cylinders on the Adventure. If I had to do this again, I would probably just cap off the existing breather hose after both hoses T together. Of course, I dutifully removed both hoses from the nipples before I worked out how difficult it would be to install the new tubes – there is just no room to work.



This became one of those “true character” tests for me. I kicked, screamed, invented many new swear words and generally threw a couple of childish tantrums before I managed to get a new tube onto both cylinder heads with the help of very long needle nose pliers, screwdrivers, and anything else that would help install the supplied clamps onto the hose. Eventually I got it done, but I am still a little unsure that the clamps are snug, or that I didn’t tear the hose during the process. I am sure that there are other guys that could do this easily, but overall, I think this step took me at least 3 hours.



I double checked that everything that needed resistance had a dongle and vacuum lines were securely plugged, and then moved back to the air filter. Heat shield went on, then the new velocity stack. Apparently, this new stack is a little shorter than the stock one, so if you don’t buy it separately you would need to cut down the OEM stack in order for it to fit correctly.



I then test fitted the new filter and it was nice and snug. Filter off and oiled, then reinstalled. I also purchased a pre-filter which I also oiled and installed.

__________________
You know you're out of your depth when your GPS tells you "after 300 feet, stop and let me off!"
TAT 2009 http://advrider.com/forums/showthread.php?t=527358
ALASKA 2011: http://advrider.com/forums/showthread.php?t=707925
HOW 2013: http://advrider.com/forums/showthread.php?t=930423
Tragic Overlander is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-27-2015, 09:20 AM   #6
PS-RagE
Studly Adventurer
 
PS-RagE's Avatar
 
Joined: Oct 2009
Location: North
Oddometer: 642
Nice!

I was not happy with the stock seat at all. With that dished out section, some engineer at KTM is telling you where your ass should be placed - I disagreed and a Renazco was high on my list
__________________
A. Dale McLean
aka PS-RagE

2007 Beta REV3 270
2012 KTM 350 EXC-F
2014 KTM 1190 Adventure R
PS-RagE is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 03-27-2015, 09:33 AM   #7
ZeZeZoom
Studly Adventurer
 
Joined: Sep 2014
Location: Lisboa, Portugal
Oddometer: 549
Congratulations on your new bike! I wish you many pleasant rides with it.

Amazing tutorial, I must say. I can't seem to find courage enough to even start dismantling my bike... so I hugely admire every one of you, inmates, that are brave enough to do it yourselves.
ZeZeZoom is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-27-2015, 10:39 AM   #8
Tragic Overlander OP
Adventurer
 
Tragic Overlander's Avatar
 
Joined: Aug 2008
Location: Rocky Mountains
Oddometer: 226
Quote:
Originally Posted by PS-RagE View Post
Nice!

I was not happy with the stock seat at all. With that dished out section, some engineer at KTM is telling you where your ass should be placed - I disagreed and a Renazco was high on my list
Agreed. After the first ride my ass was numb on the slab ride, and it was too low and restrictive in the technical stuff. It will be replaced!
__________________
You know you're out of your depth when your GPS tells you "after 300 feet, stop and let me off!"
TAT 2009 http://advrider.com/forums/showthread.php?t=527358
ALASKA 2011: http://advrider.com/forums/showthread.php?t=707925
HOW 2013: http://advrider.com/forums/showthread.php?t=930423
Tragic Overlander is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-27-2015, 10:43 AM   #9
Tragic Overlander OP
Adventurer
 
Tragic Overlander's Avatar
 
Joined: Aug 2008
Location: Rocky Mountains
Oddometer: 226
Quote:
Originally Posted by ZeZeZoom View Post
Congratulations on your new bike! I wish you many pleasant rides with it.

Amazing tutorial, I must say. I can't seem to find courage enough to even start dismantling my bike... so I hugely admire every one of you, inmates, that are brave enough to do it yourselves.
Thanks. I must admit that I procrastinated for a long time before I got stuck into it. Once I got started it was all down hill
__________________
You know you're out of your depth when your GPS tells you "after 300 feet, stop and let me off!"
TAT 2009 http://advrider.com/forums/showthread.php?t=527358
ALASKA 2011: http://advrider.com/forums/showthread.php?t=707925
HOW 2013: http://advrider.com/forums/showthread.php?t=930423
Tragic Overlander is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-27-2015, 11:06 AM   #10
Tragic Overlander OP
Adventurer
 
Tragic Overlander's Avatar
 
Joined: Aug 2008
Location: Rocky Mountains
Oddometer: 226
Next came the new skid plate. I have to say that I was impressed with the quality of this unit from Altrider. I had a BDCW unit which saw duty on my 08 990 as well as the 11 990R and it survived well for over 60,000 miles. It took a beating and had many battle scars to prove it. To say that I was impressed with the BDCW skid plate would be an understatement, and I was very tempted to buy another one. But the Altrider plate caught my attention because it appeared to allow a little more breathability, and was quite a bit cheaper. I had no experience with Altrider products, so I thought I would give it a try. It is a very solid piece of kit. The fit and finish is excellent. Everything lined up perfectly, and it does seem to offer some protection for the side stand mount. The difference between this skid plate and the stock unit is laughable.






I also removed the stock foot pegs and installed some much bigger ones from BDCW. Apart from giving a much bigger platform to stand for long periods, these pegs are also slightly lower. Combined with the rise at the bars from the steering damper, I think the ergonomics will be much better suited for me.




I also removed the stock front fender and installed some Shock Sox.




While I was at it, I removed the stock steering damper and plastic radiator guard.



The aluminum radiator guard from BDCW went on easily.



The High Fender kit from Slavens Racing included instructions to relocate the horn. This was simple, but it is fairly flimsy. The fender mount went on easily. A white Acerbis fender came with the kit and I was a bit disappointed – the color did not match the OEM plastics, and it just felt cheap. The bolt holes also had to be drilled out – no big drama, but I just wasn’t all warm and fuzzy. I ordered a OEM 690 SMC white front fender (part # 7730821000028) – the same one I had for the last couple of years on my 990R.



I removed the stock rear luggage rack – as well as the castration tools (grab handles), and installed the new Altrider unit. Again, the fit and finish was excellent, and I think the platform will be just big enough for extended touring. This unit also allows for plenty of adjustability including Rotopax mounts.



I also installed a guard for the rear brake master cylinder – again from Altrider. I had previously had a similar guard from Touratech on both 990’s – which were flimsy crap. This unit is much more solid.



The side stand safety switch was disconnected (but left in place for redundancy), and a switch dongle installed. This may seem a bit over the top, but I have had personal experience with these sensors failing (which resulted in a 990 being stranded in Alaska for a few days before a new part was sourced). Unfortunately, this newer technology of ECU’s and Canbus systems means that wires cannot just be crossed in order to bypass a switch.

__________________
You know you're out of your depth when your GPS tells you "after 300 feet, stop and let me off!"
TAT 2009 http://advrider.com/forums/showthread.php?t=527358
ALASKA 2011: http://advrider.com/forums/showthread.php?t=707925
HOW 2013: http://advrider.com/forums/showthread.php?t=930423
Tragic Overlander is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-27-2015, 11:25 AM   #11
frqflyr
n00b
 
Joined: Mar 2015
Location: san clemente, ca
Oddometer: 2
subscribed
frqflyr is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-27-2015, 11:30 AM   #12
georgee2
Curious George
 
georgee2's Avatar
 
Joined: Nov 2006
Location: North Platte, Nebraska
Oddometer: 16
Nice write-up Dave. It certainly gives me an idea where to start on mine as I must admit I haven't been giving the 1190 forums the due diligence required to make informed decisions about the needed mods.

I'm thinking I should have the bike around early April so will probably do the airbox mod in my RV at Moab. As it certainly wouldn't hurt to have someone standing by who's "been there, done that" I may enlist your help if we get a little extra time during the RMAR Rally. Everything else will have to wait for a proper shop environment when I get home in May.

Looking forward to riding and camping at Westwater next week. Don't forget the Bundaberg ! !
__________________
If it's worth doing, it's worth doing to excess!
georgee2 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-27-2015, 11:36 AM   #13
Tragic Overlander OP
Adventurer
 
Tragic Overlander's Avatar
 
Joined: Aug 2008
Location: Rocky Mountains
Oddometer: 226
The next project was installing the new BRP steering damper mount. This unit is nice, and does not require a whole new triple clamp.



It bolted straight on easily and also provides additional vibration dampening through plastic polymer inserts. I ended up going with the blue polymers which are a little softer.



I also installed some fork breather valves. My old Scotts damper mounted perfectly. Good to go.



I then added my old Flex bars, and went about reinstalling the controls.



The new KTM heated grips are much easier to install than the older ones (set screws in stead of glue), and plug right into the ACC plug. This means they can be controlled from the main computer – including heat adjustment. I now have this setting programmed into my “Favorites”.



Cycra hand guards were then attached, as well as ram mounts for the Doubletake mirrors.




Once the bars were finished, I removed the head light and wind shield, and added a GPS mount.



I think this is a KTM hard part? It was a little fiddly to install, and I am a bit nervous that it will vibrate a lot, but will have to wait until I actually get to ride the bike to find out. I have previously always just used a RAM ball mount screwed onto the dash, and have never had a problem. The Garmin Zumo 660 mounting plate fit nicely and I chased the wiring back towards the back of the bike.
__________________
You know you're out of your depth when your GPS tells you "after 300 feet, stop and let me off!"
TAT 2009 http://advrider.com/forums/showthread.php?t=527358
ALASKA 2011: http://advrider.com/forums/showthread.php?t=707925
HOW 2013: http://advrider.com/forums/showthread.php?t=930423
Tragic Overlander is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-27-2015, 12:18 PM   #14
Tragic Overlander OP
Adventurer
 
Tragic Overlander's Avatar
 
Joined: Aug 2008
Location: Rocky Mountains
Oddometer: 226
The next major step was the lighting. I was not very impressed with the light from the stock head lights, and decided to go with a Cyclops LED replacement bulb set. I took my time understanding the wiring and installation process. Once I had it figured out in my head, I set about organizing the harness.




Ostensibly, this is really a plug and play scenario, but it did take a bit of working out where everything would go. The initial seal of the bulbs was a little loose, so I replaced the gasket with the extra units supplied, and it fit perfectly.




I riveted the heat sinks in place as per the instructions and then hooked up the harness. Miraculously, the headlight fit back into the housing – although it is quite snuggly.


I also ran the harness and switch for the Baja squadrons at the same time. I put the tank back on and turned on the ignition – voilla. Everything works. The bulbs are a substantial improvement.



I then installed the Touratch head light guard. I was not really happy with this – it looks pretty trick, but I suspect it will flex and rub. Again, need to wait until the first ride.



Since I was messing with the tank, I slid on the white tank cover and was not surprised to see that it did not fit with the steering damper installed.



I hated to do it, but I took to it with the dremmel. Not pretty, but it works. I’ll hopefully clean it up a bit later.




While I was making a mess with the dremel, I thought it would be a good time to hack up some fork guards. Again, not ideal but it will be fine for a while. I wish someone would come up with a bolt on product designed for the 1190 high fender modification……..





__________________
You know you're out of your depth when your GPS tells you "after 300 feet, stop and let me off!"
TAT 2009 http://advrider.com/forums/showthread.php?t=527358
ALASKA 2011: http://advrider.com/forums/showthread.php?t=707925
HOW 2013: http://advrider.com/forums/showthread.php?t=930423
Tragic Overlander is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-27-2015, 12:31 PM   #15
Tragic Overlander OP
Adventurer
 
Tragic Overlander's Avatar
 
Joined: Aug 2008
Location: Rocky Mountains
Oddometer: 226
OK. Now for the electrical add on’s. I have decided to run all auxiliary items through a Fuzeblock. This is a nice set up, and allows certain items to be switched, and others to have constant power – depending on needs. You can add different sized fuses depending on demand as long as you don’t exceed the maximum 30A for the unit.



As others have noted, the circuit board is a little exposed, so I taped over it with 3 layers of electrical tape and softened it up with a hair drier.



I located the switched ACC wire at the rear and hooked it up to the switched power on the Fuzeblok.



I taped everything and then added a sheath for protection and zip tied so everything is clean and tight.



I then added battery charger (unswitched), GPS, heated vest, driving lights – all switched with the ignition. I also removed the various in line fuses for these items – it will be nice to have all the electrical circuits in one box. This leaves 2 spare circuits for future use. I might add a USB outlet somewhere on the rear so I can charge stuff while in the luggage when I get a chance.




Of course, after everything was zip tied into place, I realized that I had located the fuzeblock right where the seat base squeezes into the sub frame. After kicking a few things around the shop, I rewired a few things, tidied up some loose ends and it all fits nicely – including tools, spare wire, power tester, fuses etc.





This is all the stuff that came off the bike.
__________________
You know you're out of your depth when your GPS tells you "after 300 feet, stop and let me off!"
TAT 2009 http://advrider.com/forums/showthread.php?t=527358
ALASKA 2011: http://advrider.com/forums/showthread.php?t=707925
HOW 2013: http://advrider.com/forums/showthread.php?t=930423
Tragic Overlander is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Share

Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

.
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is On

Forum Jump


Times are GMT -7.   It's 10:34 PM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.5
Copyright ©2000 - 2015, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
Copyright ADVrider 2011-2015