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Old 02-16-2013, 12:29 AM   #1
kevinj OP
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broke off something - how to get it out?

||| EDIT : PROBLEM SOLVED |||

Hi everyone,

I messed up what should have been a simple maintenance task and am hoping for suggestions on saving the day. Keep in mind you're talking to a newbie here.

I was replacing the secondary spark plugs on my 2006 bmw r1200gs. They're underneath the cylinder heads and it's a bit clumsy to get to them. I must have overtightened one because I broke it off. The photo shows 1/ on the right: the intact old spark plug that I removed, and 2/ on the left: the broken new spark plug. The missing piece is still in the bike and obviously I'll have to get it out somehow.

But how? Is there a tool to do this? Or am I really in trouble?

Thanks very much,


Kevin


kevinj screwed with this post 02-17-2013 at 03:29 AM Reason: marking thread as solved
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Old 02-16-2013, 01:24 AM   #2
darkstarmoto
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Wow..that's odd. I've never seen a spark plug shaft broken off. If it's current just and open hole with the steel sleeve of the plug shaft you may be able to get a screw extractor of the correct size to try and remove it.

In the case of a broken screw or bolt you would have a solid shaft of metal in a hole. You would then drill a hole of the correct size and insert the extractor which I kind of a reverse threaded screw/bolt. You screw it into the hole and as it drives in it is tapered, so eventually it gets tight. The reverse thread exerts torque in reverse which hopefully turns the original broken shaft out.

In your case you already have a hole in the steel sleeve....so inserting the extractor should be pretty easy. Just be careful as I assume the head is aluminum. I think you may be able to find a large enough set at something like Home Depot.

Here's a link to what I'm talking about: http://www.homedepot.com/webapp/wcs/...a#.UR9BZRG9Kf0

Best of luck!
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Old 02-16-2013, 03:07 AM   #3
mark1150
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In all of my years working on cars and bikes I've never seen this happen before, perhaps a lesson to us all.
I remember sometime last year talking to friend who had an 800GS, and the subject of copperslip came up.
He swore blind that modern plugs don't need it, where as I said they should, I was called "old skool", I was wondering whether copperslip is recommended on the 12?

Anyway back to the case in hand, an extractor should get it out as the poster above has said.
Wishing you the very best of luck with it, let us know how you get on.
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Old 02-16-2013, 05:41 AM   #4
FixxiT
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See it before

Defective plug. Be glad it happened with a new plug while installing & not from galled threads when removing an old plug.

The seperated threaded part should easily come out with the appropriate size e-z out
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Old 02-16-2013, 06:02 AM   #5
Firemanmike69
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As said before a large ez out should work you could also try needle nose pliers against the ground tabs an try to turn the insert out
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Old 02-16-2013, 07:12 AM   #6
Stan_R80/7
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I would apply some penetrating oil on the threads before trying to use an ez-out tool. The threads should rotate using a finger since there is no torque on the threads. Since that is not happening, the threads are sticking and penetrating oil will help. Patience is the main ingredient when using penetrating oil and waiting 48 hours after applying will provide better results. Also, based on the end of the spark plug threaded electrode it looks like a standard flat screwdriver would work to unscrew the plug metal. Good luck!
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Old 02-16-2013, 08:00 AM   #7
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I believe I'd try the screw drive method first as an easyout tends to wedge the area its expanding against the threads themselves when dealing with very thin material such as this. Use a magnetized srewdriver just in case one ot the electrodes breaks loose.
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Old 02-16-2013, 08:44 AM   #8
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With all due respect, if changing a spark plug got away from you, the remediation processwill certainly go worse. Get an accomplished mechanic to help you, or pay him to do it. BIGGER ($$$) things can go wrong, stop now and get help. Good luck
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Old 02-16-2013, 09:49 AM   #9
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Quote:
Originally Posted by concours View Post
With all due respect, if changing a spark plug got away from you, the remediation processwill certainly go worse. Get an accomplished mechanic to help you, or pay him to do it. BIGGER ($$$) things can go wrong, stop now and get help. Good luck
+2

Stop.


get someone with more skill,
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Old 02-16-2013, 10:10 AM   #10
It'sNotTheBike
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A torque wrench it could be a good investment for you if you don't yet own one.

And taking a shop class at a local community college would probably
also be a good idea. Working on things when you lack the knowledge
and skill to do the job properly can get expensive and more importantly
it can render the machine unsafe for road use which could affect your safety
and the safety of others on the road.


.

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Old 02-16-2013, 10:12 AM   #11
It'sNotTheBike
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Quote:
Originally Posted by concours View Post
With all due respect, if changing a spark plug got away from you, the remediation processwill certainly go worse. Get an accomplished mechanic to help you, or pay him to do it. BIGGER ($$$) things can go wrong, stop now and get help. Good luck


The above is VERY good advice and paying a pro to deal with the situation is
probably some of the best money you will ever spend.



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Old 02-16-2013, 11:01 AM   #12
Dirty in all
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That happens more than anyone here knows I guess. It's a defect in the plug. Get an easy out but dont let it slip or you'll get metal shavings and you dont want that. It shouldnt be hard to remove at all. The pressure is off the threads. Simple hand pressure is all you will need. Torque wrench on spark plugs? C'mon. Hand tight and quarter turn. Theres a crush washer on every single one of them, once it's crushed passed hand tight it's seated and not going to leak or come out. If it does just carry something in your tool kit. Stop freaking the poor guy out.
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Old 02-16-2013, 11:18 AM   #13
kevinj OP
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Thanks, everyone who took the time to read and/or respond. It's great to have a community where you can share a problem in the evening and find a bunch of replies waiting in the morning.

I'll definitely try the screwdriver/needle nose pliers recommendation. If that isn't enough, I'll think carefully about the extractor. Sounds simple but I can imagine more going wrong there, and I may indeed choose to have it taken in and fixed.

As for torque wrenches, I have them. I hand-tightened first, then put the torque wrench on and waited for the click, which didn't come (or at least the spark plug broke before I got there).
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Old 02-16-2013, 11:22 AM   #14
JimVonBaden
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IMHO, first put the piston at TDC, then work out the issue. Make sure your tool doesn't go in too deep. Anyhow, once out, use a vacuum on the hole to pull out any debris.

Jim
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Old 02-16-2013, 11:37 AM   #15
Chuck Pryce
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Ok, did you get it out?
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