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Old 02-18-2013, 12:44 PM   #31
Aventeren OP
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Location: Did It: US to Ushuaia, Argentina
Oddometer: 181
Thanks for the support, Britome. I REALLY appreciate it!

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Originally Posted by Britome View Post
You absolutely did the right thing in shearing the gears. Not only does it make sense financially but emotionally. You have to know when to throw in the towel and be done with the trip. To have a relatively more clear line to closure is very valuable. I just wish I had tangible help to give.
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Old 02-18-2013, 12:46 PM   #32
Aventeren OP
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Thanks for the support, strsout! I REALLY appreciate it! I know you're right, it just sucks right now.

Just one hell of a tope to hit at the end of trip.



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Originally Posted by strsout View Post
Aventeren,
I know right now it will not sound right, but by personal experience, ( I did Prudhoe Bay-Ushuaia in 2010) I know it will pass and only the good stuff will be with you. I had some major issues when arriving Ushuaia, after 32Kmiles of lot's of fun crossing all 3 americas in the long way around. Honestly, today I don't even remember then. And I spend a lot of cash I did not have after 6 months traveling... It will pass. :)
As you wrote, you did a lifetime trip. nothing will spoil it from you now.

And I'm sure we all here are glad you will make the ferry. Then you have 4 to 5 days to find transportation to Santiago.

Keep us posted.
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Old 02-18-2013, 12:47 PM   #33
Aventeren OP
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Got it, Rockmuncher. I'll respond shortly.

Thanks

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Sending a PM
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Old 02-18-2013, 12:51 PM   #34
Aventeren OP
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Thanks for the kind words, rdwalker! I REALLY appreciate it! I guess this is an excellent opportunity to build a little character!



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Originally Posted by rdwalker View Post
So true. It always gets better with each retelling. My K12LT left me once stranded (not as far as aventeren, just enroute to Gaspe, QC) - had to abandon the bike with failed FD. Returned a month later to pick it up and continue the trip.

I remember the exercise fondly - especially the aspect of regrouping myself and making emergency arrangements that worked out quite well. Made me proud of myself. Heh, heh.
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Old 02-18-2013, 12:55 PM   #35
Aventeren OP
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It was exactly this image that awoke me quite early this AM. I know that when I tear into this thing, that I very well may find the crown gear set gone. There is no question that this is a huge sh&* burger, I just don't know how big yet. Fortunately I made it about 650 km before the grinding and noises got too bad. Only time will tell what things look like on the inside.

I have a sneaking suspicion that I am soon to be staring at a new crown gear set.

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Beware..........

This lasted less than 30 miles from the first signs of failure to terminal damage.

The resulting damage..



And what it should look like

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Old 02-18-2013, 01:40 PM   #36
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Keep your eye on eBay and beemerboneyard.com for a used FD, it'll be cheaper than buying a new gear set.
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Old 02-18-2013, 01:46 PM   #37
LaurelPerryOnLand
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GB wasn't kidding!

# Part Number Description lb Qty Each
01 33 11 2 330 020 SET: CROWNGEAR SET - I=31:11=2,82 5.26 1 $597.32
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Old 02-18-2013, 02:00 PM   #38
Aventeren OP
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Last Update Before the Boat: Horatio from Patagonia Rider Saves the Day!

So there are certain things on this trip that I will remember. The places, the sights, the smells, etc. But more than not, I have a suspicion that it will be the people that stand out. Here's why.

Last night my final drive started screaming at me to stop 145 km from Puerto Natales in a little pueblo called Villa Tehuelche, which probably has 20 houses. The type of place you see all over Latin America. It was 11p.

I wobbled into town and road to the first light in the window. It was a store. I knocked. A guy named Miguel answered. I told him my story. I asked him if I could sleep on his floor. He clearly saw that I was in need of a helping hand. He rejected my offer to sleep on the floor and led me to his spare room. He asked for 5,000 pesos (~$10), and I gave him 8,000 pesos. He's a great guy, and he saved the night for me.

I shivered through the night in my long johns, hoody, puff jacket, down jacket, socks and fleece pants (that I bought in Cuenca Ecuador and are awesome and blue). All night I listened to the (normal) wind nearly rip the roof off. I awoke early to nightmare images of sheared final drive crown gears.

I put my boots on and walked around the Villa to see if anyone had a truck. I asked one set of guys who were on their way to work. I asked the next guy, literally as he was coming out of his house, and he said to meet him at the Municipal building. So I walked over to the municipal building, and it turns out that as luck may have it, he was the City Manager. His name is Rene and he is a bad ass. He made a few phone calls, and Carlos shows up and says that he knows a guy with a truck. Carlos makes a phone call. Then Carlos leaves. Rene says basically, "Relax. Wait here. We have a truck. It's going to take you to Puerto Natales." I immediately relaxed.

On top of all of that, Rene let me use his personal desktop computer with blazing fast internet to check in on email and ADV to see if anyone had responded. Again, Rene is a bad ass.

So remember all the way back in my first post, when I mentioned that Horatio with Patagoniarider.com? He has 18 or so 1150s because he loves them. I'm just about to shut the computer down, when I receive an email from Horatio. Horatio says he has all the parts, and he is putting them on a bus to Ushuaia. I immediately respond that I am in Villa Tehuelche, but Horatio has already left to put the parts on the bus. Just like that. I wait around for a few minutes to see if he responds back, he doesn't, so I log out.

About then, Juan and Jamie show up in the truck. Jamie talks a mile a minute and Juan is a mechanic with bear paws who is more quiet--just the kind of dude that I wanted to see. Juan and I jump back in the truck to go and look for a bank to back the truck into so that I can ride the bike into the truck. I had spied a place earlier, so he and I head there. We both like it, and so we go back to the bike. On the way over to the bike, we talk price--just the two of us. He starts with 200,000 pesos, which is over $400 US. I reply that is way too much, and that I did not have that much, which was true. I offer 50,000 pesos (which I later increased to 60,000 pesos after he countered with 120,000 pesos), plus I offer to fill his tank in Puerto Natales. Two handshakes later and the price has been settled: 60,000 peses plus a tank of gas (which ended up costing 25,000 pesos--all in about $180 US. I was happy).

I ride the bike over, he has the truck backed in when I get over there. I grab a thick board from a construction site next door to use as a ramp. I hand Jamie my phone to take photos. I run the bike up on the bank, Juan positions the board and I roll the bike into the truck. Juan ties the bike down because he's a bad ass, too. Jamie is asking me a million questions as we tie the bike down, and Juan just smiles. They are both great guys.

I tell them to head back to Rene so that I can thank Rene before I leave. No problemo. Claro. I bound into the Municipal building, and Rene is in a meeting on the phone. He motions me over, and I shake his hand. I don't let go after the first shake, which always grabs someone's attention, and look him straight in the eye and make sure he understands how gracious I was for his help. It was a cool moment, and the family that is sitting at his desk smiles at me as I left. Classic.

We then head back to Miguel's place, and I get to thank him, too. Miguel has this cool pampa-style red hat, which makes him even more of bad ass. He has a smile on his face, and I give him the "gracious" double handshake and I bound back off to the truck where Juan and Jamie are sitting there smiling. Off we go.

We talk in broken present tense Spanish (because I don't know past or future tenses) the whole way to Puerto Natales. It was awesome. Jamie is supportive of oil and gas (which there is a lot of down here), but hates logging. So we talk about that. We also talk about the number of sheep (ovinas I think), and how big the ranches are. We talk about how big the fish are in that creek. We talk about how Juan makes the best asado in the whole country. We talk about how Chile and Argentina fought a battle at the frontera (border) near Puerto Natales, and how the damn British are only holding on to The Malvinas (Falkland Islands) because there is oil there. And the wind. I just can't properly communicate how the wind blows down here. It. Is. Amazing.

So we roll into Puerto Natales after 145 km and 2 hours. We drive down to the ferry, and I jump out to find an off loading ramp. We locate another bank. Juan backs in. I jump up on the bike. I have each of them on a side. We get the back tire out okay, and then the front tire won't go because the bank is too steep, so Juan jumps in and slowly pulls the truck away, which drops the front tire. Juan then zips away as I hold the front brake, and as soon as I release the front brake, the bike glides down and I'm in Puerto Natales.

I take a few photos with Juan and Jamie, I pay Juan and off they head.

I go check in for the ferry. The people at the check in are great, and they tell me about a sandwich shop. I head there and order an awesome sandwich. Just as my sandwich arrives, Juan and Jamie walk in, and they order the same sandwich on their way to the table. So I know 2 things at this point: 1) I am in the right place, and 2) I ordered the right sandwich. I inhale my sandwich, and Jamie takes a few photos of me. I bid them farewell again, and off I go.

I needed to get some cash, so I was on an ATM search. I go to the first one, and they don't take my card. I go to the second bank, and they don't have an ATM. I go to the third bank, and success. And here is where Latin America just *&^%ing grabs you. Just as my cash is spitting money out, who taps me on the shoulder but Horatio, who has driven all the way from Punta Arenas with my parts in his van! I can't freakin' believe it, and give him a hug. Mind you, Horatio immediately jumped in his van from Punta Arenas to Villa Temuelche, and then after finding out from the folks at Villa Temuelche that I had left with Juan and Jamie (because everyone knew what was going on in such a small town). So he just kept on driving, and then just drove around Puerto Natales until he found me. And he saw me walk into this bank. I still can't believe it. Punta Areas is 250 km from Puerto Natales folks--2 hours one way. I am absolutely floored.

I take him back to the sandwich shop for the same sandwich. We talk about life and this and that. Horatio tells me how great the 1150s are, and how he owns 2 in Spain (where he is from) and about how he came to manage Patagonia Rider (which is a great story), and how one of his drivers just got in a serious accident and almost killed a family with 2 small kids a few days ago. And how important it is for us to live in the moment. Here. Now. Horatio is the kind of guy that makes life an absolute (*&^ing pleasure to live. I buy lunch.

We head back out to the rig. Horatio asks me about my Pelican case that I use for my laptop, and how hard he has been looking for one like that. I ask him what computer he has. He pulls it out, I grab it and then drop it in the case. It fits perfectly. I give him the case because I can order another one on Amazon, whereas it's impossible for him to get one. Life just works sometimes.

So off we head to the bike. We back it out into the street and put it up on the center stand. I hold the rear end up, and Horatio runs the wheel a bit and wobbles it here and there, and he thinks it's just the bearing and that my gears are okay. So I am crossing my fingers that the guy who runs 18 1150s knows what's up. Only time will tell. 650 km was a lot, and there was a fair bit of noise towards the end.

Horatio and I then head to a hotel for WiFi and a coffee. Horatio grabs a hot water re-fill for his thermos and mate, and off he goes just like that. He says, pay me later for the parts ($175, which is nearly the actual US pricing for the rear seal, big bearing and small bearing--unbelievable). He says he is going to visit me in the US. I hope so, as he is a great guy. Needless to say, if you are ever planning on a trip to this part of the world, do not think twice about Patagonia Rider. Horatio is top notch--plus, he is the biggest bad ass of all. What a guy. Totally floored, and I literally just got goose bumps thinking about the ATM shoulder tap. What an absolute 180 from where I was at. Thank you universe.

So it's the people that I will remember the most. The places are just places. Mountains are just stone. Rivers are just water. Desert is just sand. But people, people are the absolute essence of this trip. Things like this happen all of the time, but never in my life have I had a people experience like this. This one will stay logged for a while--hopefully a long while. So if you ever get the chance to BE a Miguel or a Rene or Juan or a Jamie or a *&^%in' Horatio, jump at the opportunity. Making these types of connections is what makes life rich--not money or things. Okay, off soap box.

In any event, I think I am now going to rip into my final drive either on the boat or when I get off in Puerto Montt. Horatio told me that I will likely have to pay $1,000 or more to get the bike to Santiago. So I am hoping that there are enough gears left for me to hobble up to Santiago. If not, I don't know yet. My chips are on Plan A right now. I will then ship the bike home. Once I get the bike home, I will reopen the FD and probably swap everything out again, plus clean it really good--and also replace the clutch (which Horatio thinks is going because I need to be 4,500 rpm to cruise at 80 mph / 120 kph when I should only be at 3,500 rpm). So I have significant shop time ahead of me, but maybe I can hook up with another 1150 owner back in the US, and we can have a few weekends to help each other out.

I just got word that the wind is blowing too hard for the boat to dock, so boarding has been pushed back 3 hours. I think it's going to be longer. I just can't tell you how hard the wind blows here. In any event, I'm in Puerto Natales, and a huge part of my triage strategy is in place--and now even more so because of Horatio.

What a deal. What a 180. Wow.

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Old 02-18-2013, 02:03 PM   #39
Aventeren OP
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Location: Did It: US to Ushuaia, Argentina
Oddometer: 181
The crown gear price was the first thing I checked once I had internet (actually the tab is still open in my browser). Still cheaper than a truck from Ushuaia, though--plus the missed ferry ($380), plus the food and lodging, etc etc etc. Getting away from the most southern city in the world was priority 1. Again, I knew I was going to take flack for that move, but it is what it is.

Quote:
Originally Posted by LaurelPerryOnLand View Post
# Part Number Description lb Qty Each
01 33 11 2 330 020 SET: CROWNGEAR SET - I=31:11=2,82 5.26 1 $597.32
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Old 02-18-2013, 02:05 PM   #40
Aventeren OP
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Location: Did It: US to Ushuaia, Argentina
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I received a PM from a certain unnamed ADVer with just such a thing, so I very well may go the used route, as Horatio at Patagonia Rider has ran 18 1150s in a fleet for the past 10 years, and has never had to change a crown gear set. So maybe I'll just go used for the gears (or a whole used FD), and then just keep a spare bearing set until I need to swap that out.

Thanks!

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Keep your eye on eBay and beemerboneyard.com for a used FD, it'll be cheaper than buying a new gear set.
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Old 02-18-2013, 02:07 PM   #41
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man, what a fantastic read.
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Old 02-18-2013, 02:21 PM   #42
Aventeren OP
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Location: Did It: US to Ushuaia, Argentina
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Future Post: Anatomy of a FD Failure

All--

I just flat don't have time now, but I will update this thread later with photos and hopefully video of how this all came to be. Oil streaming out of the FD with keys being blown off the bike because of the crazy Patagonia wind, plus fire side chats (literally) will hopefully shed some light for others on how to get through something like I just came through.

Additionally, I am going to offer my two cents on strategy for dealing with this as it happens, as well as how I would have done this differently with a bag full of hindsight. As you might imagine, riding for 650 km with a progressively failing FD gave me an opportunity to observe what was happening, plus develop strategies for dealing with the *&^% burger as it developed. Plus, I was doing a good job of beating up on myself for how this happened, so I had a good bit of time to think about how to not have this happen again--to me...or MOST importantly, to others that have bikes with FDs that are thinking of taking similar trips.

I think these FDs are okay, but I would just have a different plan for the future--and I want to tell others about that so that hopefully they don't get themselves into a situation like I did.

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Old 02-18-2013, 02:22 PM   #43
Aventeren OP
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Thanks, BobbySands.

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man, what a fantastic read.
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Old 02-18-2013, 02:31 PM   #44
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A man, brother!!

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Originally Posted by BobbySands View Post
man, what a fantastic read.
On the read, that's an Ah Man for me, too! Scares me up about the FD crappin' out, though.
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Old 02-18-2013, 02:33 PM   #45
Aventeren OP
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KemoSabe1943, I have quite a bit to say about these FDs, but I just don't have time right now to go into that. Please check back in, as I think I have several thoughts that may help allay your fears.

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On the read, that's an Ah Man for me, too! Scares me up about the FD crappin' out, though.
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