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Old 03-03-2013, 03:56 AM   #16
hensmen
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Hello rom Germany, not the best explainer
but i used a dupple latter, the v-form, i took the weel to the end, where the two latter parts are connected and with two peaces off wood, i could give enough pressure on the tyre.
But sometime you need a hammer, means a second person ore take these straps,you take to secure load and keep the pressure on the ladder.
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Old 03-03-2013, 05:43 AM   #17
dm635
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I need to know how to do this road side. A learned skill that should be known. But I'm having the shop that ordered my new tire do it next week for $20. Mount, balance out the door. I've got to order a new front tire soon & will probably attempt myself.
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Old 03-03-2013, 05:53 AM   #18
boxerboy81
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For roadside, or home, get some rim protectors otherwise things can get ugly quick.
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Old 03-03-2013, 06:35 AM   #19
Idle
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Quote:
Originally Posted by hensmen View Post
Hello rom Germany, not the best explainer
but i used a dupple latter, the v-form, i took the weel to the end, where the two latter parts are connected and with two peaces off wood, i could give enough pressure on the tyre.
But sometime you need a hammer, means a second person ore take these straps,you take to secure load and keep the pressure on the ladder.
Hans
Pretty good explanation and a great idea to break the bead.
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Old 03-03-2013, 07:38 AM   #20
Paul_Rochdale
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Here in the UK, we take our wheels to a tyre depot (every town has one) and it's done professionally. In forty five years riding I've have never ever changed a tyre nor known anyone (perhaps trials riders do) to bother with it. It wasn't until I joined international motorcycle forum some years ago that I realised this wasn't the case in America.

I have seen the sidestand method demonstrated at a Horizons Unlimited meeting and it was impressive. OK in emergencies. I carry a can of Tyreweld which works a treat. My last experience of a roadside puncture was on the way to Liverpool Docks to catch the Isle of Man ferry. Something as thick as an HB pencil pierced the rear tyre of my Pan and two plugs and two tiny gas cylinders failed to cure it. I rode for miles with almost no air in the tyre then finally dumped an aersol can of Tyreweld in and it lasted for days until I could get a new tyre fitted. Marvelous stuff!
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Old 03-03-2013, 09:05 AM   #21
kantuckid
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Quote:
Originally Posted by dm635 View Post
I need to know how to do this road side. A learned skill that should be known. But I'm having the shop that ordered my new tire do it next week for $20. Mount, balance out the door. I've got to order a new front tire soon & will probably attempt myself.
As to cutting them off when real old-I use a grinder. Get rim protectors-some are better designed than others. MotionPro are good but don't always slip on every rim thats thicker at edge. I use large paint stir sticks/thin wood scraps in shop to hold the tire when moving my levers around
FWIW, go to the post by "Poolside" on how to change a tire. I found it interesting. Also look at Stubby brand tire tools -I plan to buy them.
In the UK having a town real close(part of the problem & the solution,huh?) is the reality-not so true elsewhere!
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Old 03-03-2013, 10:09 AM   #22
190e
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Not everyone in the UK uses a tire depot. I've always changed my own. It wasn't even remotely difficult until alloy wheel came along.
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Old 03-03-2013, 12:43 PM   #23
Paul_Rochdale
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OK, 99.999% of riders use a TYRE depot and I suspect from your spelling you're from the Sargasso Sea.
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Old 03-03-2013, 01:23 PM   #24
hensmen
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As a much more addicted money safer than a scottsman, i am a swabian from the south off Germany, the first time i heared off the mainstand theory, by the BMW r100 GS, cause off their high flanks.
Beside, i have about three bikes in use, one hack for winterdriving. Till now i changed all tyres by myselve. The use off the hard tyreprofil is against the finetuning. The two irons and the three plastic covers are always in the luggage. It is not only to safe money, but i buy the tyres in the internet and the dealers are not pleased to change tyres from other dealers.
The ladder was my last choice, by a used wheel buy, and the liquid soap helped to safe the day.
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Old 03-03-2013, 01:47 PM   #25
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^that's the very point that drove me to change my own tires a few years ago. BT45's at my local shop were going to cost over $300, on the internet I got them for right about $200. I wouldn't insult a shop owner by bringing him a tire that I bought elsewhere. The local guy said that when you buy a tire mail order, it may be years old and deteriorated, but whenever I've bought them they seemed fresh as a daisy. Has anyone here had any trouble with internet tires?
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Old 03-03-2013, 02:30 PM   #26
supershaft
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Some nice bead breaking contraptions. I wish I had a photo of mine. It's a small car's scissor jack, about 15 inches of 4x4 wood and another chunk of wood. That and a door jam is what I use to break beads. I have broken a lot of beads thusly. I suggest not to use your rim as a tire tool fulcrum point to break a bead. That sounds like a gouged rim waiting to happen. Breaking the bead on the road? Personally, I run tubeless. I fix flats with vulcanizing plugs and go. Tube type? The center stand has worked for me. Taking the tire off and on? My motto is 'work the well'. That is what it is there for!

supershaft screwed with this post 03-03-2013 at 03:52 PM
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Old 03-03-2013, 02:43 PM   #27
81twins
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Best Rest Products out of Seattle has a great bead breaker that also comes apart, fits in a small roll and travels well.
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Old 03-03-2013, 03:01 PM   #28
rambozo
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I have a Sealey bead breaker that's pretty much identical to the harbour freight
one in the photo at the start of the thread, I think shite is a very apt description of it,
it's not sturdy enough for a tough bead and it's easy to damage a rim with it

Never heard of the side stand method, who ever came up with that needs a pat on the
back
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Old 03-03-2013, 03:51 PM   #29
supershaft
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Quote:
Originally Posted by rambozo View Post
I have a Sealey bead breaker that's pretty much identical to the harbour freight
one in the photo at the start of the thread, I think shite is a very apt description of it,
it's not sturdy enough for a tough bead and it's easy to damage a rim with it

Never heard of the side stand method, who ever came up with that needs a pat on the
back
Oops! I meant CENTER stand.
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Old 03-03-2013, 04:46 PM   #30
ME 109
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Quote:
Originally Posted by supershaft View Post
Oops! I meant CENTER stand.
That's what you said originally.
Did you mean side stand?

I tried the centre stand once on my rear wheel. Not a good idea.
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