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Old 03-10-2013, 03:10 PM   #76
slartidbartfast
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Joined: Dec 2003
Location: Southern Louisiana or Southern England or ...
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Quote:
Originally Posted by farmerstu View Post
so you're one of those people who can't merge and expect others to accomadate your inability to fit into the flow of trafficc.
i will accommodate a semi or anyone towing,as they lack the ability to accelerate into traffic. i will also move over if traffic dictates it.
anyone who is too stupid to speed up and merge in front of me or slow up and slide in behind me gets no room from me. it's your job to fit into traffic not mine to risk a lane change.
Nope, I'm one of those people who knows exactly how to merge and how to make/take space when needed. On the bike, most of the time, you won't even know I'm there until I'm merged, past you and on my way. Like you, I also try to anticipate and accomodate the needs of others who are merging or changing lanes, whether they signal or not.
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Old 03-10-2013, 07:15 PM   #77
khager
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Rucksta View Post
Turn signal is to indicate to a driver following in an adjacent lane to accelerate to fill a gap.
I have made it a habit to always use my turn signal now when in the cage. I figure if some biker is riding in my blind spot and I somehow miss him, he will see my blinker come on and either drop back or speed up and get out of the way. Haven't missed one yet but you never know.
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Old 03-15-2013, 10:08 AM   #78
steelerider
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Location: Lancaster, PA.
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My Tips:
1: Get licensed properly. MSF a minimum. Learn the right way to ride. Picking up bad riding habits from your Uncle, cousin, whoever who thought you how to ride is a bad idea.
2: High beams on. I don't care if it momentarily annoys an oncoming driver. If I am annoying you briefly, you have seen me. Being hit by someone who "never even saw you" is more annoying.
3: Gear up. When you've had road rash scrubbed out the first time, you will understand. I literally passed out from the pain my first time.
4: High vis helps. You don't need an entire jacket made of the stuff, just enough to differentiate you from the background. There's tons of tastefully done high viz jackets out there
5: Dont depend on your high viz to safe your life. Its not a guarantee that people will start seeing you.
6: On the highway, ride it like you own it. Defend your space. If someone gets into it, move away. Use the power of the bike to get you out of a potentially dangerous space quickly.
7: Stay the hell away from 18 wheelers.
8: Never, ever drink and ride. Ever.
9. Cover your front brake. 2 Fingers, always in traffic.
10: Intersections, you need to raise your awareness level to 10. Get in, get out.
11. Learn how to confidently perform an emergency stop, at multiple speeds. Use that front brake properly.
12. Read "Proficient motorcycling" This book will show you what it means to be "proficient" rider.
13. Wear your f'n helmet. FFS.
14. Your biggest defense is correct road positioning. Think about using this to your advantage. Place yourself to give the maximum safety and visibility to those around you. This is HUGE.
15. Read the road. Surface, shape, condition, etc. etc.
16. Practice in a parking lot. Tight u Turns, figure 8's - I can usually tell the skill of any rider by watching him ride below 6mph. The more confident you are handling a bike at a walking pace, they better rider you will be.

Rock on.
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Old 03-15-2013, 10:42 AM   #79
Screzzy
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Location: Columbus, OH
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Quote:
Originally Posted by khager View Post
I have made it a habit to always use my turn signal now when in the cage. I figure if some biker is riding in my blind spot and I somehow miss him, he will see my blinker come on and either drop back or speed up and get out of the way. Haven't missed one yet but you never know.
Odds are he'll get rear ended by a cop.
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Old 03-25-2013, 05:07 PM   #80
390beretta OP
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Joined: Oct 2009
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Quote:
Originally Posted by steelerider View Post
My Tips:
1: Get licensed properly. MSF a minimum. Learn the right way to ride. Picking up bad riding habits from your Uncle, cousin, whoever who thought you how to ride is a bad idea.
2: High beams on. I don't care if it momentarily annoys an oncoming driver. If I am annoying you briefly, you have seen me. Being hit by someone who "never even saw you" is more annoying.
3: Gear up. When you've had road rash scrubbed out the first time, you will understand. I literally passed out from the pain my first time.
4: High vis helps. You don't need an entire jacket made of the stuff, just enough to differentiate you from the background. There's tons of tastefully done high viz jackets out there
5: Dont depend on your high viz to safe your life. Its not a guarantee that people will start seeing you.
6: On the highway, ride it like you own it. Defend your space. If someone gets into it, move away. Use the power of the bike to get you out of a potentially dangerous space quickly.
7: Stay the hell away from 18 wheelers.
8: Never, ever drink and ride. Ever.
9. Cover your front brake. 2 Fingers, always in traffic.
10: Intersections, you need to raise your awareness level to 10. Get in, get out.
11. Learn how to confidently perform an emergency stop, at multiple speeds. Use that front brake properly.
12. Read "Proficient motorcycling" This book will show you what it means to be "proficient" rider.
13. Wear your f'n helmet. FFS.
14. Your biggest defense is correct road positioning. Think about using this to your advantage. Place yourself to give the maximum safety and visibility to those around you. This is HUGE.
15. Read the road. Surface, shape, condition, etc. etc.
16. Practice in a parking lot. Tight u Turns, figure 8's - I can usually tell the skill of any rider by watching him ride below 6mph. The more confident you are handling a bike at a walking pace, they better rider you will be.

Rock on.
Excellent! Agree a lot. Elaborate a bit re: lane positioning please. I have my thoughts and would like to hear yours.
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Old 03-26-2013, 10:05 PM   #81
Import
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Quote:
Originally Posted by 390beretta View Post
Excellent! Agree a lot. Elaborate a bit re: lane positioning please. I have my thoughts and would like to hear yours.
I agree with steel rider,
In the right lane, I always dominate the lane by riding to the left of center, cages can't undertake.... And if they want to pass they have to go all the way round....

In the left lane, I prefer to ride to the right of center, it gives cages a chance to see me quicker in their mirrors, and leaves me room to react and hit the horn if they missed me.

On round abouts and when in doubt i reinforce turn signals with hand gestures....... I sill believe eye contact Is important, although no guarantee of result.

Eighteen wheelers are at the least unpredictable, always leave as much room as possible, and get past as swiftly as you can, go back to your ride speed once you are safe, cross winds are often a factor, so be aware....

My chief instructor on my advanced course said to me.... The bigger the vehicle, the greater the gap you leave, position yourself so you can see the danger in front and behind.........
Remember we all have so much passing power, showing a little restraint will allow you to get home safely......
Enjoy...........
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Old 03-26-2013, 11:02 PM   #82
windmill
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Joined: Feb 2008
Location: Kent, Washington State
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Quote:
Originally Posted by steelerider View Post
My Tips:
1: Get licensed properly. MSF a minimum. Learn the right way to ride. Picking up bad riding habits from your Uncle, cousin, whoever who thought you how to ride is a bad idea.
2: High beams on. I don't care if it momentarily annoys an oncoming driver. If I am annoying you briefly, you have seen me. Being hit by someone who "never even saw you" is more annoying.
3: Gear up. When you've had road rash scrubbed out the first time, you will understand. I literally passed out from the pain my first time.
4: High vis helps. You don't need an entire jacket made of the stuff, just enough to differentiate you from the background. There's tons of tastefully done high viz jackets out there
5: Dont depend on your high viz to safe your life. Its not a guarantee that people will start seeing you.
6: On the highway, ride it like you own it. Defend your space. If someone gets into it, move away. Use the power of the bike to get you out of a potentially dangerous space quickly.
7: Stay the hell away from 18 wheelers.
8: Never, ever drink and ride. Ever.
9. Cover your front brake. 2 Fingers, always in traffic.
10: Intersections, you need to raise your awareness level to 10. Get in, get out.
11. Learn how to confidently perform an emergency stop, at multiple speeds. Use that front brake properly.
12. Read "Proficient motorcycling" This book will show you what it means to be "proficient" rider.
13. Wear your f'n helmet. FFS.
14. Your biggest defense is correct road positioning. Think about using this to your advantage. Place yourself to give the maximum safety and visibility to those around you. This is HUGE.
15. Read the road. Surface, shape, condition, etc. etc.
16. Practice in a parking lot. Tight u Turns, figure 8's - I can usually tell the skill of any rider by watching him ride below 6mph. The more confident you are handling a bike at a walking pace, they better rider you will be.

Rock on.
I agree with everything except the high beams.

They should only be used with bikes that have weak headlights. Most of todays bikes have very bright lights, their high beams will mask your turn signals, make it very difficult to judge your speed and distance, and interfere with the ability of others to observe whats near you.
The goal is to be seen without creating issues for yourself for others, forcing others to look away is not a productive way to be "seen".
There are so many intelligent, responsible, effective options, there is no excuse for irresponsible use of high beams.

Good rule of thumb,
If a driver can't see the turn signals, or see which way the rider is looking, the lights are too bright.



IMO, the words "I don't care" don't belong in a motorcyclists vocabulary, we're too vulnerable to not care about every decision we make, these days its unwise seek negative attention.
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Old 03-26-2013, 11:14 PM   #83
DAKEZ
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Location: OR
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Quote:
Originally Posted by windmill View Post
I agree with everything except the high beams.

They should only be used with bikes that have weak headlights. Most of todays bikes have very bright lights, their high beams will mask your turn signals, make it very difficult to judge your speed and distance, and interfere with the ability of others to observe whats near you.
The goal is to be seen without creating issues for yourself for others, forcing others to look away is not a productive way to be "seen".
There are so many intelligent, responsible, effective options, there is no excuse for irresponsible use of high beams.



IMO, the words "I don't care" don't belong in a motorcyclists vocabulary, we're too vulnerable to not care about every decision we make, these days its unwise seek negative attention.
+1
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Old 03-26-2013, 11:34 PM   #84
the_sandman_454
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Joined: Jul 2012
Location: Coleman, Michigan
Oddometer: 411
Try not to get upset at that idiot who just cut you off or pulled some other bonehead move. Just avoid the hazard as best you can and get on with the rest of your ride. Nothing good will happen as a result of being mad. A bike will not win a pissing match vs a cage, those have 'the right of weight'. Ask yourself questions to critique your technique. Did your lane position contribute to the cage driver having trouble seeing you, were you hanging out in that guy's blindspot, etc.

Continual improvement of skills and analyzing your technique and incidents you're in are important, as they can improve your avoidance of future incidents.

Don't draft other vehicles, especially the semis. Tire blowouts are unpredictable, and you'll have virtually no time to react and avoid debris from a blowout or anything the truck happens to run over, potholes, etc.

Try to scan well ahead of your current position. 10-12s is a good goal. If that isn't possible, then just be alert and look as far ahead as you can for anything that can threaten your safety (animals, other vehicles, obstacles, intersections/traffic signals. It isn't easy to be this attentive for long blocks of time, but try for continuous improvement here too.
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Old 03-26-2013, 11:41 PM   #85
fallingoff
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Joined: Jun 2011
Location: syd oz
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Quote:
Originally Posted by steelerider View Post
My Tips:
1: Get licensed properly. MSF a minimum. Learn the right way to ride. Picking up bad riding habits from your Uncle, cousin, whoever who thought you how to ride is a bad idea.
2: High beams on. I don't care if it momentarily annoys an oncoming driver. If I am annoying you briefly, you have seen me. Being hit by someone who "never even saw you" is more annoying.
3: Gear up. When you've had road rash scrubbed out the first time, you will understand. I literally passed out from the pain my first time.
4: High vis helps. You don't need an entire jacket made of the stuff, just enough to differentiate you from the background. There's tons of tastefully done high viz jackets out there
5: Dont depend on your high viz to safe your life. Its not a guarantee that people will start seeing you.
6: On the highway, ride it like you own it. Defend your space. If someone gets into it, move away. Use the power of the bike to get you out of a potentially dangerous space quickly.
7: Stay the hell away from 18 wheelers.
8: Never, ever drink and ride. Ever.
9. Cover your front brake. 2 Fingers, always in traffic.
10: Intersections, you need to raise your awareness level to 10. Get in, get out.
11. Learn how to confidently perform an emergency stop, at multiple speeds. Use that front brake properly.
12. Read "Proficient motorcycling" This book will show you what it means to be "proficient" rider.
13. Wear your f'n helmet. FFS.
14. Your biggest defense is correct road positioning. Think about using this to your advantage. Place yourself to give the maximum safety and visibility to those around you. This is HUGE.
15. Read the road. Surface, shape, condition, etc. etc.
16. Practice in a parking lot. Tight u Turns, figure 8's - I can usually tell the skill of any rider by watching him ride below 6mph. The more confident you are handling a bike at a walking pace, they better rider you will be.

Rock on.
lost me on no.2

why why why do you want to piss people off

everybody else suffers for your arrogance

think about it.

otherwise i agree

cheers
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Old 03-27-2013, 07:49 AM   #86
slartidbartfast
Love those blue pipes
 
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Joined: Dec 2003
Location: Southern Louisiana or Southern England or ...
Oddometer: 4,792
Quote:
Originally Posted by DAKEZ View Post
Quote:
Originally Posted by windmill View Post
I agree with everything except the high beams.

They should only be used with bikes that have weak headlights. Most of todays bikes have very bright lights, their high beams will mask your turn signals, make it very difficult to judge your speed and distance, and interfere with the ability of others to observe whats near you.
The goal is to be seen without creating issues for yourself for others, forcing others to look away is not a productive way to be "seen".
There are so many intelligent, responsible, effective options, there is no excuse for irresponsible use of high beams.

Good rule of thumb,
If a driver can't see the turn signals, or see which way the rider is looking, the lights are too bright.



IMO, the words "I don't care" don't belong in a motorcyclists vocabulary, we're too vulnerable to not care about every decision we make, these days its unwise seek negative attention.
+1
+2
__________________
MSF Ridercoach IBA: 35353 95 R1100GSA, 93 GTS1000, 85 R80RT, 93 DR350/435, 99 RX125, 78 DT100
January 2010 New Zealand South Island ride
Summer 2009 UK to Alps ride
Summer 2008 UK End-to-End ride
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Old 03-28-2013, 08:07 AM   #87
Screzzy
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Joined: Sep 2008
Location: Columbus, OH
Oddometer: 185
Quote:
Originally Posted by Import View Post
In the right lane, I always dominate the lane by riding to the left of center, cages can't undertake.... And if they want to pass they have to go all the way round....

In the left lane, I prefer to ride to the right of center, it gives cages a chance to see me quicker in their mirrors, and leaves me room to react and hit the horn if they missed me.
+1

On a busy highway, failure to follow this practice is a death wish.
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Old 03-28-2013, 05:52 PM   #88
Kommando
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Location: Spacecoaster FL
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1. Learn to ride properly. Take a BRC. Practice the drills regularly. I practice braking and counter-steering quite frequently. SEE. Re-read the book occasionally. Ride dirt too. Get used to less-than-ideal surfaces/terrain. Read other material and scenarios. Continue taking courses and learning from other sources.

2. Pre-ride checks. Check the bike. Check yourself. If your head isn't in the ride, take a break until it is.

3. Wear hi-viz with reflectivity, but don't depend on it and become complacent. It only works for people that are looking and care. Many people aren't looking. Many people don't care.

4. Make sure you have good mirrors on your bikes. Adjust them so you can see pretty much 360-degrees around you if you use peripheral vision.

5. Improve the lighting and reflective surfaces on your bikes. I have a tail/brake LED bulb that flashes 3x before going solid. I also install BRIGHT extra marker LED strips...red visible from the sides and rear, and amber visible from the sides and front. I also have yellow fog lights, for some color variation and the "triangle of lights". Their color contrast also works well for me in rain/fog/snow. My bikes have the stock reflectors on them, and I also have red/white reflective tape on the sides and rear. My DR is also blue, but it has bright white side plastics, headlight shroud, and handguards. These stand out nicely. My DR is pretty visible at night, looks almost stock when parked in daylight, and uses less wattage than stock until I turn on the fog lights. I also religiously use my signals on public roads.

6. Wear gear. The right gear doesn't just protect you from slides or impacts. It also protects you from the elements.

7. See and be seen. ACTIVELY choose your lane, lane position, and position around roadside obstacles and other vehicles accordingly. Keep your head on a swivel and MAINTAIN awareness of vehicles 360-degrees around you. I do this even on empty highways, at night, even when I don't see vehicle lights.

8. Lateral movement. Dakez turned me onto this and it WORKS. Like with hi-viz, don't trust it and become complacent though. I use this in fog/rain, even when riding an open road with no cross-traffic. It makes one more visible to critters ahead or drivers that are still coming up behind you at 80MPH.

9. Keep your head on a swivel and your bike in gear, even when stopped...and even when 2 or more cages are sitting behind you. I've seen situations where the 4th vehicle up, or the 2nd vehicle in line, got crunched. I angle my bike to a hole when stopping, and stop far enough back to take advantage of it and still have other options.

10. Don't pace next to other vehicles, don't ride in blind spots, don't follow large/loaded vehicles so close that you can't easily dodge something they might roll over or lose. Get past them or drop back. I don't dawdle when passing anybody, even if both of our lanes are on the same side of the road. I don't pass on double-yellow lines either.

11. Let faster traffic through. I use the passing lane for passing, then I move over. If the idiot in the left lane starts pacing me, I often speed up or slow down to let faster traffic through. I also pull over, where it's safe, to let faster traffic through if there is no other safe/legal passing opportunity for them.

12. I don't stop on the side of the road unless it's an absolute necessity. I've seen enough videos of troopers and roadside-assistance guys getting hit...even with all their blinky-flashy lights going.

13. I don't make sudden unexpected maneuvers. If I miss my turn or exit, I miss it and swing a u-turn. I don't jam on the brakes and turn left from the right lane, or turn right from the left lane. I don't swing u-turns from the right shoulder, and I sure don't turn/merge/lane-change without a signal.

14. Ride like you're invisible. Pay attention for the people who can still see you, and want to kill you. Some people have a chip on their shoulder about something.

15. Don't ride considerably faster or slower than people would normally expect.

16. Space. Proactively create and maintain it.

17. Don't ride too much bike or too little bike for you to safely handle. A DR125 aint gonna cut it on L.A. freeways, and a 900lb bagger with forward controls aint ideal for commuting in Buffalo snow as a noob.

18. Don't out-ride your sightlines...onroad or offroad.

19. Ride your own ride. Encourage others to do the same.

20. Secure your trash. Don't trust bungees. Re-check your trash regularly, including the latches and mounts on hard luggage.

21. Don't treat public roads like a racetrack.

22. When 2 lanes are turning, take the outside lane.

23. Before entering an intersection, check left, right, and left again (driving on the right side of road).

24. Don't ride when drinking, exhausted, high, incapacitated, etc.

Kommando screwed with this post 03-28-2013 at 06:06 PM
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Old 03-29-2013, 08:01 AM   #89
ttpete
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Joined: May 2009
Location: Dearborn, MI
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Kommando View Post
1. Learn to ride properly. Take a BRC. Practice the drills regularly. I practice braking and counter-steering quite frequently. SEE. Re-read the book occasionally. Ride dirt too. Get used to less-than-ideal surfaces/terrain. Read other material and scenarios. Continue taking courses and learning from other sources.

2. Pre-ride checks. Check the bike. Check yourself. If your head isn't in the ride, take a break until it is.

3. Wear hi-viz with reflectivity, but don't depend on it and become complacent. It only works for people that are looking and care. Many people aren't looking. Many people don't care.

4. Make sure you have good mirrors on your bikes. Adjust them so you can see pretty much 360-degrees around you if you use peripheral vision.

5. Improve the lighting and reflective surfaces on your bikes. I have a tail/brake LED bulb that flashes 3x before going solid. I also install BRIGHT extra marker LED strips...red visible from the sides and rear, and amber visible from the sides and front. I also have yellow fog lights, for some color variation and the "triangle of lights". Their color contrast also works well for me in rain/fog/snow. My bikes have the stock reflectors on them, and I also have red/white reflective tape on the sides and rear. My DR is also blue, but it has bright white side plastics, headlight shroud, and handguards. These stand out nicely. My DR is pretty visible at night, looks almost stock when parked in daylight, and uses less wattage than stock until I turn on the fog lights. I also religiously use my signals on public roads.

6. Wear gear. The right gear doesn't just protect you from slides or impacts. It also protects you from the elements.

7. See and be seen. ACTIVELY choose your lane, lane position, and position around roadside obstacles and other vehicles accordingly. Keep your head on a swivel and MAINTAIN awareness of vehicles 360-degrees around you. I do this even on empty highways, at night, even when I don't see vehicle lights.

8. Lateral movement. Dakez turned me onto this and it WORKS. Like with hi-viz, don't trust it and become complacent though. I use this in fog/rain, even when riding an open road with no cross-traffic. It makes one more visible to critters ahead or drivers that are still coming up behind you at 80MPH.

9. Keep your head on a swivel and your bike in gear, even when stopped...and even when 2 or more cages are sitting behind you. I've seen situations where the 4th vehicle up, or the 2nd vehicle in line, got crunched. I angle my bike to a hole when stopping, and stop far enough back to take advantage of it and still have other options.

10. Don't pace next to other vehicles, don't ride in blind spots, don't follow large/loaded vehicles so close that you can't easily dodge something they might roll over or lose. Get past them or drop back. I don't dawdle when passing anybody, even if both of our lanes are on the same side of the road. I don't pass on double-yellow lines either.

11. Let faster traffic through. I use the passing lane for passing, then I move over. If the idiot in the left lane starts pacing me, I often speed up or slow down to let faster traffic through. I also pull over, where it's safe, to let faster traffic through if there is no other safe/legal passing opportunity for them.

12. I don't stop on the side of the road unless it's an absolute necessity. I've seen enough videos of troopers and roadside-assistance guys getting hit...even with all their blinky-flashy lights going.

13. I don't make sudden unexpected maneuvers. If I miss my turn or exit, I miss it and swing a u-turn. I don't jam on the brakes and turn left from the right lane, or turn right from the left lane. I don't swing u-turns from the right shoulder, and I sure don't turn/merge/lane-change without a signal.

14. Ride like you're invisible. Pay attention for the people who can still see you, and want to kill you. Some people have a chip on their shoulder about something.

15. Don't ride considerably faster or slower than people would normally expect.

16. Space. Proactively create and maintain it.

17. Don't ride too much bike or too little bike for you to safely handle. A DR125 aint gonna cut it on L.A. freeways, and a 900lb bagger with forward controls aint ideal for commuting in Buffalo snow as a noob.

18. Don't out-ride your sightlines...onroad or offroad.

19. Ride your own ride. Encourage others to do the same.

20. Secure your trash. Don't trust bungees. Re-check your trash regularly, including the latches and mounts on hard luggage.

21. Don't treat public roads like a racetrack.

22. When 2 lanes are turning, take the outside lane.

23. Before entering an intersection, check left, right, and left again (driving on the right side of road).

24. Don't ride when drinking, exhausted, high, incapacitated, etc.
I can condense this down:

1. Read and memorize "Proficient Motorcycling".

All the above is in there.......
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Old 03-29-2013, 08:37 AM   #90
steelerider
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Joined: Jul 2011
Location: Lancaster, PA.
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Quote:
Originally Posted by 390beretta View Post
Excellent! Agree a lot. Elaborate a bit re: lane positioning please. I have my thoughts and would like to hear yours.
My thoughts on lane positioning are such that I will always place myself in a position that gives me the greatest visibility (see) and the greatest opportunity for other drivers to see me.
Place the bike in a position that it is more difficult for someone else to hit you.
For instance, you are on a two lane road. A vehicle is coming towards you, and there is a driveway / street on the to your right. Is it possible that the oncoming vehicle may make a sudden, non-indiacted left hand turn right in front of you? Sure. If you simply accelerate so that you pass the street BEFORE that car has an opportunity to turn, you lessen the risk. In other words, you do not pass the entrance to the street at the same time as the vehicle - he has no opportunity to turn in front of you.
As for the high beams (during day only), I've honestly never had someone wave at me in irritation, or annoyance. Maybe some of you can say the same? I do have the ability to aim the high beam lower on my RT, which is where it is set during the day. At night, high beams are never on unless there is no on-coming traffic.
OH well, good info here on this thread.
Cheers mates!
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