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Old 05-04-2013, 02:46 PM   #106
slartidbartfast
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Notes:
- Motorcycles are generally less prone to hydroplaning than cars.
- All other things being equal, the best things you can do to reduce the chance of hydroplaning is to limit your speed when standing water is possible and to keep your tire pressures up. Tires with low pressure will hydroplane at lower speeds.
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Old 05-07-2013, 06:53 AM   #107
opticalmace
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Martin_404 View Post
In the Netherlands all the (motorcycle) driving instructors will teach you to always drive about 5 to 10km/h over the speedlimit. Everywhere!
The people that jurge your driving at the exam, share the beleive that this is the safest way to drive a motorcycle, because it enables you to make the decisions, rather then waiting to see what the cars around you are going to do.

If you stay at the speed limit or below, you will fail your driving test!
In that case, you apparently do not have enough confidence in your own skills and need some more lessons.

You are also suppost to use your ability to speed-up, if that helps you avoid dangerous situations.
This means that if you go way over the speed limit during the driving test, but you where able to avoid a dangerous situation, you will get a compliment for it.
This is especially true on the highway and when getting on/of the highway.

Anoyinglly these are not official rules.
Police officers will usually understand why you are doing it and will allow it. (as long as you are actually doing it for safety reasons)
Automatic speedingcams do not look at motorcyles differently.
So your doing it exactly as you where taught, and still you get speeding tickets.
Wow! I'm impressed if this is really the case.
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Old 05-13-2013, 01:26 AM   #108
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Originally Posted by opticalmace View Post
Wow! I'm impressed if this is really the case.
It is. (I'm from the Netherlands myself)
Our motorcycle driving exams are taken very serious, with a theoretical exam, then an obstical course exam (figure 8, emergency braking, etc) and a final on-road driving test.

Can get a bit expensive but when you pass it, you are better prepared.

Our latest rules even say that young drivers can only start with low CC bikes.
11kW -> 18yo / 35kW -> 20yo / unlimited kW -> 24yo (or 22yo with 2 years driving experience)
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Old 05-13-2013, 02:26 AM   #109
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Originally Posted by lnewqban View Post
Ride as if all car drivers are blind, and you’re invisible, and react accordingly.

That is good advice. It requires staying alert, though, and that is not always easy to do, especially on longer trips. Still it is what you should aim for.

And I would add this specific tip:

On the highway, where speeds are higher, learn to spot all possible turning places on YOUR side of the road. Those are the places, where the cagers coming across will try to turn to, and while doing this, might get on a collision course with you. At highway speeds, the consequences to you are easily disastrous. When you have such possible turning place spotted (a small driveway, a parking lot, sometimes just a ´path´ leading to the woods etc) check out what the cars coming across are doing. If any one of them is slowing down at all, they could be planning a turn. It is not guaranteed they will use a blinker.

It can still lead to a very dangerous situation, even if you can see in advance, that a car is starting to make a turn. Also trying to notice, when a car coming across is slowing down, can sometimes be pretty hard to do (as is trying to notice EVERY possible place, where they might turn across your lane!) But at least TRYING to be aware of this, might increase your chances, when some *sshole decides to cut straight in front of you. (..Oh yeah, also make sure you have bright headlights on your motorcycle, and always use them, even in bright daylight, because this increases the chance that the cager, who´s planning to turn, will see you).

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Old 05-13-2013, 03:35 AM   #110
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When you are in the most left lane, stay on the right side of that lane, relatively close to the cars that are driving next to you in the middle lane.
(while off-course always trying to avoid being in his blind spot)

If these cars on your right, make a unexpected move toward you, yes, you are closer to him, but you also have more room to manouvre out of his path, before he presses you against the guard-rail (or oncoming trafic)

When you are on the right side of the lane and the car in front of you slams his brakes, you also are already perfectlly positioned to lane-split between the 3th and 2nd lane. (avoiding having to brake yourself and very likely getting rear-ended)
You can also still dive to the left and go between him and the guard-rail. (least favorite option)
When you drive on the left/center of the lane and you have to dive towards the right in order to lane-split 3th & 2nd, you will scare the hell out of people in the middle lane. (plus you risk hitting them, because it is still an emergengy manouvre)
Much better to already be in the right position and barely having to steer.

When you are in the most left lane and you would stay in the center/left, you are also loosing visibility behind you, because when you now look in your left hand mirror, all you will see is the guard-rail.
If you look in this mirror while you are on the right side of the lane, you will suddenly see that car that has creeped very close up to you. (while you where scanning the busy traphic ahead of you)
When you depend only on your right-hand mirror, you will very likely not see that car. (try it)

These comments are only for when you are in the most left lane.
In the middle/right lanes it is generally best to stay in the center of your lane.
Depending on the situation off-course. (road conditions, dirt, oil, etc. etc.)

Martin_404 screwed with this post 05-13-2013 at 09:41 AM
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Old 05-13-2013, 02:08 PM   #111
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Bluhduh Walmart

Stay the hell away from Walmart supercenters, especially around the first of the month.
The drivers make zombies look benevolent by comparison.
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Old 05-14-2013, 08:23 AM   #112
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Martin_404 View Post
When you are in the most left lane, stay on the right side of that lane, relatively close to the cars that are driving next to you in the middle lane.
(while off-course always trying to avoid being in his blind spot)

If these cars on your right, make a unexpected move toward you, yes, you are closer to him, but you also have more room to manouvre out of his path, before he presses you against the guard-rail (or oncoming trafic)

When you are on the right side of the lane and the car in front of you slams his brakes, you also are already perfectlly positioned to lane-split between the 3th and 2nd lane. (avoiding having to brake yourself and very likely getting rear-ended)
You can also still dive to the left and go between him and the guard-rail. (least favorite option)
When you drive on the left/center of the lane and you have to dive towards the right in order to lane-split 3th & 2nd, you will scare the hell out of people in the middle lane. (plus you risk hitting them, because it is still an emergengy manouvre)
Much better to already be in the right position and barely having to steer.

When you are in the most left lane and you would stay in the center/left, you are also loosing visibility behind you, because when you now look in your left hand mirror, all you will see is the guard-rail.
If you look in this mirror while you are on the right side of the lane, you will suddenly see that car that has creeped very close up to you. (while you where scanning the busy traphic ahead of you)
When you depend only on your right-hand mirror, you will very likely not see that car. (try it)

These comments are only for when you are in the most left lane.
In the middle/right lanes it is generally best to stay in the center of your lane.
Depending on the situation off-course. (road conditions, dirt, oil, etc. etc.)
I always give a wide berth to cagers, whenever I can. Does not make a whole lotta sense to be any nearer than you have to. Plus when you're close to a larger vehicle, it blocks a great part of your view. Danger can loom behind that vehicle. I've personally had a very large pig run straight into my path on a motorway, it barely missed the front of a truck, and then it was in front of me. Somehow I survived that day, but it was a good lesson, that when something big is close to you on the road, literally anything can be hidden behind it.
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Old 05-14-2013, 09:59 AM   #113
Martin_404
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You do make a good point.
Without arguing about which is the lesser of 2 evils, lets agree that it's always good to be aware of all the options and possible senario's.
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Old 05-14-2013, 10:18 AM   #114
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Actually I agree with most points you made, the only one I questioned was positioning to the right, close to cars. (quoting with this mobile phone is a PITA, so got lazy and quoted the lot!)

And I couldn't agree more about being aware, and trying to work out all possible scenarios in advance. Won't save you with 100% certainty, but it often helps a lot. The most dangerous things are the remaining ones that you weren't able or could not figure out in time.
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Old 05-14-2013, 02:47 PM   #115
fatalpinist
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When approaching an intersection or side street and I see a vehicle waiting to turn/cross/merge I watch the spokes or front tire of the vehicle. I never trust that the driver is making eye contact with me.

Your eye can pick up rotational movement easier than the vehicle creeping forward because the brake has been released.

Might give you an extra half second to realize they don't see you and are beginning to pull out.
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Old 05-14-2013, 09:31 PM   #116
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Yellow Lights...

Greetings,

I am sometimes catching yellow lights at intersections... my immediate response is to apply the brakes immediately which sometimes is very unnerving.

What is the proper method when approaching the intersection when the light is green and then turns yellow when you are already at speed?

Any advice would be appreciated.
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Old 05-15-2013, 01:21 AM   #117
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I often worry about getting rear-ended when coming to a quick stop due to a yellow light by a driver that's paying attention to the light and not to whether I went through ahead of them or not.
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Old 05-15-2013, 01:36 AM   #118
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Whenever you see a traficlight (any color) or a regular intersection approaching in the distance, first thing you do is start checking your mirrors, so you know if it is going to be safe to do a emergengy brake later-on.
(if not, you might not want to depend on your brakes at all, but rather start checking if the sidewalks, or oposite lanes etc. are empty)

I was told by my driving instructor to generally run the yellow light until right before it turns red.
Chances are big that a car behind you expects you to run the yellow (especially when you are on a fast motorcycle) so he might even accelerate to do the same.
I only brake for a yellow light, if there is plenty of time to gratually slow down in a save manner.

All intersections are different, so there is no golden rule.
If there is a large truck blocking your view towards the side streets, everything changes.
If there are pedestrians ignoring the lights, everything changes.
Again, it all starts with checking your mirrors and escape routes, long before you have to make a decision.

When there are cars stopping in front, check if it safe to lane-split.
Where I live this is legal, but in my opinion, anything is always better then the risk of getting rear-ended, so I would also risk it if it was not legal.
A cop would have to be a real dick, to give you a ticked if you are really doing it for obvious safety reasons.

If lane splitting is not a option, at least steer your bike toward a gap, so you can dive in there if needed.
Always keep your bike in first gear at intersections, so you only have to let go of the clutch to make the bike move.

Also leave a large gap between you and the car in front of you.
It makes you more visible to cars around you and chances are that the car behind you is also going to keep a save distance if he sees you doing it.
If you almost hit the bumper of the car in front of you, the people behind you will most likely behave like sheep and do the same to you.

Keep checking your mirrors, also when there is already one car that has stopped behind you, because when he gets rear-ended ....

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Old 05-15-2013, 07:27 AM   #119
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Pecha72 View Post
Actually I agree with most points you made, the only one I questioned was positioning to the right, close to cars. (quoting with this mobile phone is a PITA, so got lazy and quoted the lot!)

And I couldn't agree more about being aware, and trying to work out all possible scenarios in advance. Won't save you with 100% certainty, but it often helps a lot. The most dangerous things are the remaining ones that you weren't able or could not figure out in time.
If you've already given up half your reaction room, where does that leave you? Off-road/into a ditch!

Horizontal movement attracts attention. Hence the 'drunk cyclist's weave' when approaching cross streets.

If you're towards the middle of the lane and someone crosses over towards you, your movement away *may* attract enough attention to avert whatever action the oncoming driver may have been contemplating.

If you're already over to the right, you're not moving, and you're not going to be seen.

M
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Old 05-15-2013, 10:33 AM   #120
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Gummee! View Post
If you've already given up half your reaction room, where does that leave you? Off-road/into a ditch!

Horizontal movement attracts attention. Hence the 'drunk cyclist's weave' when approaching cross streets.

If you're towards the middle of the lane and someone crosses over towards you, your movement away *may* attract enough attention to avert whatever action the oncoming driver may have been contemplating.

If you're already over to the right, you're not moving, and you're not going to be seen.

M
He is talking about being on a two lane road with both lanes traveling the same direction. You are in the number 1 lane in the left, passing cars on the right in the number 2 lane.

I ride to the left in the number 1 lane. I don't care if the cagers see me or not, I'm going to ride in such a way that allows me to avoid contact. I disagree with the line of thought that says you should stop riding like you're invisible to increase your conspicuity.
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