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Old 03-16-2013, 09:43 PM   #16
Pablo83
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Joined: Aug 2008
Location: Woodland Park, CO
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If you've been thinking about building a custom bike, it's a great idea to start with a free bike. That way if you get into it an decide it's not for you, you haven't lost a lot of money. Just make sure you get a title before you put any effort into the bike.

Here's my free '86 Honda Rebel 450 (Before):


After - This was my first custom bike build. It took years. I sold it for $2200 and probably had less than $1000 in parts into it.


Here's a $400 bike I got from the pawn shop:


This build took a little less than a year. It's worth a more now than a mint version of the stock bike would be worth.


Here's a $400 '75 CB400F that I bought last fall:




Here's what it looked like a month later (I've had a lot of bike building experience since that Rebel). I sold this one for $2500.
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Old 03-17-2013, 02:27 PM   #17
CharlieT
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Now add your cost up for those builds and include labor costs. As with most builds, labor costs will easily and often far exceed parts/supplies.



Nice job on those bikes, BTW.
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Old 03-17-2013, 06:29 PM   #18
Pablo83
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Quote:
Originally Posted by CharlieT View Post
Now add your cost up for those builds and include labor costs. As with most builds, labor costs will easily and often far exceed parts/supplies.
You're absolutely right.

That last one I made $30/hr which was a goal I was trying to hit, but on the first 5 or 6 bikes I built/restored I probably made $3/hr. I'm just trying to tell the OP that if he wants to know what it's like to build a custom bike, a free bike is the right one to start with.

Happy St. Patty's Day!
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Old 03-24-2013, 03:38 PM   #19
zap2504
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Joined: Feb 2006
Location: Middletown, PA
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Quote:
Originally Posted by RBnite View Post
even if the engine seems frozen, take the plugs out-carefully- and squirt some WD-40 down the cylinders. Many projects I have done had some surface rust on one cylinder. won't take much to get it going. Then if it is missing or won't start at all then tear it apart! Time and money?? what else you got to do besides hang out on forums?

;-)
+100! Especially since this is a Suzuki GS series. I believe these had roller bearing cranks. Also - this is the motherlode for Suzuki GS info: http://www.thegsresources.com/

Generally speaking, the "L" series Suzukis (or Honda Customs, Kawasaki LTDs, Yamaha Maxims, etc.) more lend themselves to a bobber mod than cafe due to the small rear wheels, stepped seats, long forks and forward-mounted front axles.
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Old 03-24-2013, 04:30 PM   #20
baloneyskin daddy
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The smaller Suzook inline 4s had plain bearing cranks.
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Old 03-25-2013, 08:40 PM   #21
EXO OP
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The guy says case bearings then says crank bearings. I have the bike now it runs but is kinda doggy when you crack the throttle. and for some reason RPMs just around at idle a little bit. one second they will be low almost low enough to stall out then they jump up pretty good i dont know i have not had time to get into it yet with work and all. im just going to keep it all original for now get all the kinks worked out and ride it for the season back and forth to work then in the winter i will dig into it.
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Old 03-25-2013, 09:07 PM   #22
JamesG
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The crank bearings are in the cases.

The hessitation could come from a number of things. Gummed up carbs, intake leaks, out of tolerance valves, etc.
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Old 03-28-2013, 06:57 PM   #23
RBnite
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Location: Down by the river
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Quote:
Originally Posted by EXO View Post
The guy says case bearings then says crank bearings. I have the bike now it runs but is kinda doggy when you crack the throttle. and for some reason RPMs just around at idle a little bit. one second they will be low almost low enough to stall out then they jump up pretty good i dont know i have not had time to get into it yet with work and all. im just going to keep it all original for now get all the kinks worked out and ride it for the season back and forth to work then in the winter i will dig into it.
I am not the champion of simplicity but, Get it out and ride it for a few hours at high way speeds, you will be surprised at how much the thing will clear out after that.
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