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Old 03-14-2013, 12:38 PM   #1
Sporting Wood OP
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Joined: Oct 2011
Location: Horneytown, NC
Oddometer: 892
KTM LC8 Air Filter Kits by SW7

SportingWood's KTM 950 & 990 Air Filter Kit



Photos courtesy of thumper996 and Corsa996



SportingWood's SW7 intake system makes more power for your LC8. There is absolutely no other modification that costs so little while rewarding so much. Improvement doesn't stop at horsepower gains, better throttle response and a flatter, quicker torque curve either. Eliminating the KTM's bulky and restrictive airbox makes carburetor/ throttle body access easy and valve service a snap. More airflow under the tank makes for a cooler running engine too. ITG's Megaflow dual layer foam racing filter more than triples filtration area and provides the added security only oiled foam can provide in dusty adventure biking conditions. Plus its infinitely reusable. ITG manufacturers our Megaflow filters especially with a special dusty environment foam not available elsewhere. There is no better filter for your bike, guaranteed!

Features

* Precision Laser Cut Anodized Alloy Adapter Plate won't crack, leak, warp or deform like nearly identical systems costing nearly twice as much.

* No other kit seals as well nor provides an OEM style connection as these. Rather than simply sitting on top of an O or X ring, this adapter has its attachment integrated into the flange by way of custom molded Buna-N rubber grommets. This Seals all three mounting surfaces, prevents any metal on metal contact and effectively isolates vibration.

* High Quality Especially Manufactured Dual Density Dusty Condition ITG Foam Air Filter allows for far better power, easier carburetor access, far easier servicing and is easily cleaned and reused over and over again.

*Dzus quarter turn fasteners and clips that make access a simple matter of two quick turns without the need for tools.




Additional information and important things to know about this mod.

Do not use alcohol based oil or cleaners on the filter. The alcohol breaks down the filter's adhesive bond. The importer says that some alcohol based filter oils and cleaners such as Notoil, K&N, etc..., have had detrimental effects on the filters. For this reason I recommend to use a good alcohol free oil and clean with soap and water alone.

Kits also include the adapter plate, grommets, ITG filter, Dzus fasteners, clips, crankcase vent hose extension, and all hardware necessary to install. The standard OFF-ROAD USE ONLY Kit does not include any accommodation to adapt crankcase ventilation inside the ITG filter. I can drill the plate by special request for those wishing to install the crankcase vent inside the airbox. A vent tube extension that re-routes the crankcase breather to a place over the countershaft sprocket is included. This puts the warm water vapor and oil mist somewhere it doesn't cost performance and may actually serve to lube the chain! Alternatively, many customers choose to attach a generic 5/8" breather to the end of the factory hose.

A free flowing exhaust and re-jetting (950) or re--mapping (990) is an absolute requirement for safe use of this product. I sell and fully support users who opt for the Factory Pro Jet Kit for the 950's. I highly recommend using TuneECU for 990's. PM for mapping suggestions tailored for your bike.


SportingWood ITG JC30-65 package including plate, filter, grommets, crankcase breather tube, Dzus clips and all necessary fasteners. Does NOT FIT SUPER ENDURO (990 version displayed above)
$229+shipping


Carburetors or EFI:




Add SAS Plates +$18:




Add Over-Sock Filter +$58:








SportingWood ITG JC30-65 'Sausage' filter package for 950 SE including plate, grommets, crankcase breather tube, Dzus clips and all necessary fasteners.
$259+shipping

Add Trimmed Velocity Stacks +40:




Add SAS Plates +$18:








SportingWood SW7 Trimmed Velocity Stacks for 950SE
$40+shipping
Add to Cart


SportingWood SW7 ITG filter plate only (no filter)with grommets, Dzus clips and fasteners. (950 version displayed above)
$109+shipping


Carburators or EFI?:








ITG JC30-65 air filter only (other heights available by special order) $119


Filter height:








ITG JC30-65 Sausage Version air filter only (other heights available by special order) $149


Filter Height:








ITG Dual Filtration Over-Sock $58
Add to Cart


SAS Block Off Plates $18
Add to Cart


Factory Pro Jet Kit with replacement titanium needles and clips, more main jets than you will need(158, 160, 162, 165, 168, 170, 172, 175, 178, 180, 182), 45 pilot jets, and replacement stainless screws for the fuel bowls.
$99+shipping
Add to Cart



Add to Cart
Fuel Intake O-Rings for all 950's

View Cart

USE ADV DISCOUNT CODE "ADVRider" and receive 10% off!


Terms are all prepaid with a cash back guarantee (excluding shipping) if your are not satisfied for any reason as long as the product is returned in good condition within 30 days.

Additionally, I'm just a member here, not a professional vendor of parts, accessories or financial services. This endeavor isn't about making loads of cash (obviously), its about sharing this really great improvement to LC8 riders who will most certainly appreciate it!

More HP - Less$

Please include your contact phone number for the shipper with all orders. Payments accepted via Paypal (note exactly what you want in the email) and checks sent snail mail (pm for payment instructions.)

[IMG][/IMG]

Sporting Wood screwed with this post 08-19-2014 at 01:57 PM
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Old 03-14-2013, 12:39 PM   #2
Sporting Wood OP
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Location: Horneytown, NC
Oddometer: 892
ITS HERE! What's Next?



Installation courtesy of Dirtjack.

Quote:
Originally Posted by DirtJack View Post
I'm supposed to be taking it easy due to a medical issue, but SportingWood's air filter has been sitting there for 2 weeks and my Dr. doesn't read AdvRider, so out to the garage.

Off with these bits (easy to do, but sometimes not so easy to get back on, but in my case no problem since I have studs for the crash bars and thru bolts for the lower tank mounts).



Next, the tanks need to come off (need an oil change? now's the time). I have an oil drain tube, so I'll do that another time.



Now that the tanks are off your bike might look like:



Next you need to remove the snorkel (if you have one) and the air box top, crankcase breather and ambient air temperature sensor (I unscrewed the sensor since you need to install it on the air cleaner base later) giving you something like:



You also have to remove the velocity stacks and paper air filter. You will use the velocity stacks to hold the new filter base plate on later.

Now you have some fiddly issues to deal with. Take off the air box side covers, loosen the fuel line from the FI fuel rail and release the FI electrical connector on the right side of the frame. This one is always a bitch on my bike. I have to move my second fan and shroud and the radiator catch bottle to loosen the connector.



Next loosen the top hose clamp holding both throttle bodies and lift them up and out of the way. I zip tie them to the handlebars. You don't have to disconnect the throttle cables.

Then you should loosen the bottom clamp for each throttle body boot and remove the boots. Finally, lift the air box bottom up off the intake tubes and your bike might look like:



(Need to check valve clearance? Now's maybe the time. Loosen the radiator mounts and oil tank moving those forward for additional room for the front cylinder.)

Next you can reinstall the throttle body boots, tightening the bottom clamps.



Now you can lower the throttle body assembly back onto the boots and tighten the top clamps. I oriented the clamps so all connections could be accessed from the same side, but this is not necessary since we are not working through a air box side hole anymore. This is also a good time to check/adjust the throttle cables.



Now you are almost ready for the SW's neat stuff. First install the ambient air temperature sensor in the filter base plate using the supplied hardware. You can now slip the base over the throttle bodies. Note that the Dzus connectors should be on the right and the temp sensor towards the front. The
velocity stacks are used to hold the base plate in place and compress SW's neat rubber rings giving a tight seal and firm attachment of the base plate.



Now you should oil up the filter (I use NoToil, but they say not to use NoToil cleaner - I usually use dish soap or laundry detergent when cleaning my other foam filters) and put a heavy ring of filter oil or grease around the edge of the base plate to insure proper seal. After the filter is in place it might look like:



I used a UNI UP-124 filter on the crankcase breather and zipped it to the frame.





I wanted to check the clearance between the seat bottom and the rear edge of the filter.



It's close, but the seat does not compress the filter top. Now put the tanks, and plastic bits and crash bars back on and ride. I need to find a source for filter skins to use on longer rides in dusty conditions.

I had already done the canister removal and SAS removal. If you have not done that, then you need to either do that or deal with where you will mount the SAS plumbing which used to be attached to the rear of the air box.

My bike has Wings cans with small size spark arrestors/DB reducers. Before installing the air filter, I ran the stock 2007 map and the bike ran well but border line lean giving around 44 MPG when running on pavement at speed. It will need another map to accommodate the new air filter. In a later post I will give some details of what I plan to do with TuneECU.
Every kit comes with two additional soft sealing gaskets. These are optional and aid in fitment as not every bike fits the same. I recommend installing without these but in the event that you need additional thickness, if the adaptor plate is loose, then install these as shown below. Attach the adhesive down onto the intakes. These will tighten the plates attachment while also providing an additional seal against any dust intrusion through the mount.


Additional install pics courtesy of YellowPig








How to install the included crankcase vent extension tube? First, remove the factory tube above the pcv valve and replace. Route along the left frame using the included zip ties.


Attach similarly to the chain guard directly above the countershaft sprocket.



950 Jetting.

I am currently running 163/165 mains, 45 pilots, Factory Pro needle in the 3rd clip, 1.5/1.25 screws and floats at 4.5mm

I also have run 170/172 mains, 42 pilots, Factory Pro needle in the 3rd clip, 1.75/1.5 screws and floats at 3.5mm with great results, best for altitude.


Here's one inmate blublapp's jetting and dyno.

175 mains
Factory Pro needle #2
Floatlevel 4mm
Screws at 2
Rest standard!

120.4 hp on the clutch
109.9 Nm torque on clutch

112.2 rwhp
104.6 Nm rw-torque


Sporting Wood screwed with this post 04-16-2014 at 02:23 PM
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Old 03-14-2013, 12:49 PM   #3
KtmPedro220
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Please don't think I'm being rude but what are the benefits of this set up? Would I be worth investing?
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Old 03-14-2013, 01:01 PM   #4
Sporting Wood OP
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Quote:
Originally Posted by KtmPedro220 View Post
Please don't think I'm being rude but what are the benefits of this set up? Would I be worth investing?

The big 3 reasons IMHO;

1. Power, up from 155/160 main jets to 170-180.

2. Ease of service, simply pops off with 2 dzus and two twists of the velocity stacks. Ever taken off the airbox to get to the valves or tried to swap jets in the carb?

3.Reusability. Rinse, Use, Repeat. This costs approximately the same as 3 factory air filters.
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Old 03-14-2013, 01:22 PM   #5
mousitsas
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SW, how likely is it to offer a jetting package too?
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Old 03-14-2013, 01:38 PM   #6
Sporting Wood OP
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Quote:
Originally Posted by mousitsas View Post
SW, how likely is it to offer a jetting package too?
I might!

Sporting Wood screwed with this post 04-25-2013 at 04:30 AM
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Old 03-14-2013, 03:43 PM   #7
TcRulz
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Oddometer: 289
Alloy bases

Hi Sporting, I just filled my tanks for the 2nd time and got another 42 mpg. This is the same as running a Pre-filter and tiny jets (140,142) I'm at 800 metres and have 180 and 182 mains and this thing cracks. This is all win and cheap when you consider the cost of materials and the hours doing it by hand.

Your right about the no-toil products....ate my pre-filter and rusted the springs (not stainless). A couple of thoughts - if you face the hose clamps (that hold the carby down) so they do up from the right you never have to take the left hand fuel tank off again to work on the carby's. Also replaced the rear bolts (that hold the black tray down) with studs so now I never have to unscrew the glove box from the tray again. The seat once installed holds it all down. Easy now to work on everything.

I haven't found any downside to this and think this is one of the best mods anyone can do to their bike.
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Old 03-18-2013, 10:18 PM   #8
Thumper996
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Very Interested, sent you a PM
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Old 03-18-2013, 10:56 PM   #9
Thumper996
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Payment sent for kit for 2006 KTM 950 Supermoto
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Old 03-19-2013, 05:44 AM   #10
Sporting Wood OP
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Joined: Oct 2011
Location: Horneytown, NC
Oddometer: 892
Quote:
Originally Posted by Thumper996 View Post
Payment sent for kit for 2006 KTM 950 Supermoto
Thanks, got it. Filters are estimated here in 2-3 weeks and everything else is here. I'll be updating the thread soon with fresh pictures of the finished product.
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Old 03-19-2013, 02:07 PM   #11
KTMandu
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Interested. PM'd you
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06 950 Adv
06 400 EXC
03 200 EXC
00 300 EXC
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Old 03-19-2013, 05:32 PM   #12
Sporting Wood OP
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Oddometer: 892
Quote:
Originally Posted by TcRulz View Post
Hi Sporting, I just filled my tanks for the 2nd time and got another 42 mpg. This is the same as running a Pre-filter and tiny jets (140,142) I'm at 800 metres and have 180 and 182 mains and this thing cracks. This is all win and cheap when you consider the cost of materials and the hours doing it by hand.

Your right about the no-toil products....ate my pre-filter and rusted the springs (not stainless). A couple of thoughts - if you face the hose clamps (that hold the carby down) so they do up from the right you never have to take the left hand fuel tank off again to work on the carby's. Also replaced the rear bolts (that hold the black tray down) with studs so now I never have to unscrew the glove box from the tray again. The seat once installed holds it all down. Easy now to work on everything.

I haven't found any downside to this and think this is one of the best mods anyone can do to their bike.
Good to hear, Glenn! Giant main jets, gobs of hp and 42mpg, how can this be a bad thing? (course I'm guessing those were Imperial gallons)

May I post some of the pics of your install? The filter you used, a super tall JC30-100 Sausage (available only by special order fyi), looks great!
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Old 03-19-2013, 08:18 PM   #13
TcRulz
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Sporting Wood View Post
Good to hear, Glenn! Giant main jets, gobs of hp and 42mpg, how can this be a bad thing? (course I'm guessing those were Imperial gallons)

May I post some of the pics of your install? The filter you used, a super tall JC30-100 Sausage (available only by special order fyi), looks great!
Go for it Sporting (Chris). You know if you show those photo's it's going to change the world as we know it and you'll sell heaps

My mains are large. Might go down a size or two, or just leave it alone as the plugs look right and this thing just goes so hard. Exhaust is nice and clean and not sooty. And this is from a bike with 76000 kms

My fuel is imperial measurements and by my calculations you are getting 47 mpg in my measurements (4.5 litres to our gallon) which is outstanding.

So why hasn't everyone got one?
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Old 03-19-2013, 10:57 PM   #14
preppypyro
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This looks interesting, forgive my ignorance though. Would this be similar to the "other" kits out there that are fairly popular? I dont wanna name some names, but the ones that claim a power increase and whatnot.

What other supporting mods would a guy need to get? Besides h2w jets Im assuming. I drive a fair bit of gravel, would this system be good use for my style of riding, or is this more for on road type stuff?

I need a new air filter pretty soon anyways, and I think Im going to buy this system, but Im prety stupid when it comes to these mods! Need to know slightly what im getting into first haha.
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Old 03-20-2013, 05:53 AM   #15
Sporting Wood OP
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Quote:
Originally Posted by preppypyro View Post
This looks interesting, forgive my ignorance though. Would this be similar to the "other" kits out there that are fairly popular? I dont wanna name some names, but the ones that claim a power increase and whatnot.

What other supporting mods would a guy need to get? Besides h2w jets Im assuming. I drive a fair bit of gravel, would this system be good use for my style of riding, or is this more for on road type stuff?

I need a new air filter pretty soon anyways, and I think Im going to buy this system, but Im prety stupid when it comes to these mods! Need to know slightly what im getting into first haha.
My kit is similar in that it uses the same or at least a similar filter manufactured by ITG. That's really where the similarities end. Materials and method of attachment are completely different. I've gotten a few questions about this, and I suppose its a natural one to ask. A close look will reveal little in common.

Only thing additional that's necessary is jetting and a crankcase vent filter. Its a straightforward and simple install. There will be a power increase once you get the carbs adjusted correctly to compensate for healthier airflow. Having a good jet kit and some intel as to what works best in your part of the world and at your elevations is the only real hurdle I can think of. My jetting setup is tuned for flexibility and economy with power available at the top of the range. I like it because it works everywhere. Many guys would rather tune for power and stronger midrange with a 45 pilot or a higher needle, fuel mileage and altitude flexibility be damned! That's OK too. You may need to add a tractor weight to keep the front down if you go this route. It all depends on what you're after. I mention this because its important to know what you're getting into and what your options are.

I also ride a lot of gravel and dirt. Air filters fill up quicker and this is where having a foam filter is nice. All it'll need when it gets dirty is a bath and some fresh oil and it'll last as long as the bike. Considering a new factory paper filter is almost $50, this will pay for itself quickly.
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