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Old 03-19-2013, 07:44 AM   #16
Foot dragger
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Ive been riding singletrack since I was about 15 or so,the whole "going over the edge" while riding narrow trail cut into a sidehill doesnt happen much unless a guy is new at it,and gets target fixation on the downhill side.
You WILL go where you look just like always.

Gotta concentrate on the trail ahead and Dont lean to the downhill side or put that foot out no matter what,it gets ugly quick if you do.

A newb went over the edge the other weekend,a couple of us had tow straps so we tied em together and 6 or 7 of us hauled it straight up more then 15'.

He said he just started staring over the edge,his foot came out and he went for a fast ride straight down with the bike on top of him,I watched it and was relieved when he got up and was ok.

Its a mental thing riding those kinds of trails more then anything.
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Old 03-19-2013, 07:44 AM   #17
Jnich77
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Use a block and tackle, they have worked for hundreds of years.
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Old 03-19-2013, 07:52 AM   #18
Foot dragger
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Quote:
Originally Posted by GusinCA View Post
Well mine is just a little Wr250R and no Ural sidecar, and having a winch onboard seems a bit, well, "heavy"... :)

I'm just surprised it doesn't happen more often, given some of the precarious trails I've seen.

There's always this video I found:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=HVUo0qXClw4

And this one

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=XXiqgD5EKeA

Both of these guys got so friggin lucky...
Those are both really smart videos,1st one the guy is hauling ass like hes in a race....right next to a huge cliff while riding through rocks.
Avoidable? If he had gone with the bike,that would be that.

Next video he rides right over a blind hill where there was nothing but a cliff,coulda been 100' drop for all he knew.
Smart? Look before you leap.

Both good lessons
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Old 03-19-2013, 07:54 AM   #19
Foot dragger
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Originally Posted by Jnich77 View Post
Use a block and tackle, they have worked for hundreds of years.
And who will carry that on a singletrack bike?
In 35 years of trail riding I would have needed it once so far.
But it would work great if you had it.
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Old 03-19-2013, 08:07 AM   #20
Wlfman
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Originally Posted by Foot dragger View Post
And who will carry that on a singletrack bike?
In 35 years of trail riding I would have needed it once so far.
But it would work great if you had it.
The kit I linked weighs less than 3 pounds and can be used for numerous things other than bike recovery...
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Old 03-19-2013, 09:13 AM   #21
Blue&Yellow
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Originally Posted by Wlfman View Post
The kit I linked weighs less than 3 pounds and can be used for numerous things other than bike recovery...
You know - I'm usually a bit of a minimalist but I've been thinking about getting something like that together. Shouldn't cost too much - 179 is certainly a bit excessive.

I remember some hour-long fights in knee deep mud where something like this would have made my stress levels much more bearable - peace of mind backup solution so to speak.
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Old 03-19-2013, 09:18 AM   #22
eatpasta
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When I raced the Catalina Grand Prix a few years ago, there was a fire road section of the course that had a very high drop.....I still cant believe they had a race out there.... but anyways as Im bringing up the rear in my race I come around the corner and there is a guy that had ridden off the edge of the road, somehow climbed up and had found race banners somewhere and was attempting to recover his bike, by himself by dragging the bike up the cliff with race banners during the race.
I felt bad for him but I knew there was no way in HELL he was getting that thing back up....
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Old 03-19-2013, 09:34 AM   #23
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I lost a DR200 off the trail once, took one look at it, turned off the fuel and headed for home on foot. It was almost dark, 4 miles cross country without a flashlight, then 5 more miles to home. Went back a week later with my ATV and pulled it back to the trail, took the ATV home and walked back to the DR, rode it home. The whole thing really sucked.

A guy I work with lost a bike into a canyon out by himself in Nevada, it was geared too tall and he seized the motor trying to get it out. He left it, two years later he went back with a new cylinder and piston, plus a longer chain and a huge rear sprocket. Rode that bastard out of there and took it home.
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Old 03-19-2013, 09:46 AM   #24
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Some good answers here, and that motorcycle recovery kit looks cool. I've been riding for 33 years and it's never happened to me, but there's some trails where even if the bike goes 5 feet over a certain slope there's no getting it back by yourself, and the trail is too narrow to bring a quad in. Usually there is something to anchor to, but pulling a 300 pound bike, on it's side, over rocks and bushes/roots might be too much for even that recovery kit. I wonder how much renting a helicopter costs...
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Old 03-19-2013, 10:31 AM   #25
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Helicopter is (I've heard), about $2000/hour.

I don't ride by myself, ever, out in the boonies.

We had a guy fly his bike down a shale slope, about 200 feet, took about 6 guys an hour to drag it back up, down is Big Sir, off Plaskitt Ridge. Then we had to haul him to Community Hospital in Monterey, a good 1 1/2 hours away, to get stitched up.

Those guys in the side hacks are nuts. Can you imagine being stuck underneath one?
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Old 03-19-2013, 10:55 AM   #26
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Back around 1975 or so ,a friend and I decended into a ravine on what looked like a trail but kept getting steeper and gnarlier as we went and soon enough we were at the point of no return. We eventually found the stream at the bottom and walked,carried,drug and occasionally rode our bikes,searching for a way out. It was starting to get dark and we could hear some cars in the distance but were dead tired and soaked to the bone. We hiked on foot about a mile to a bridge and crawled up to see where we were and looked for a place to try to get our bikes out. I found one area where it looked like a fairly clean shot to daylight and had a little room to get some momentum for the climb. After repeated tries from both of us to climb this hill I finally got a hell of a run and shot up over the edge and right into a family having a big cookout in their backyard. Boy the looks I got from those people. I took off to leave my buddy fend for himself About a mile down the road I found the bridge we had hiked to and waited and listened for my buddy. It didn't sound like the noise I was hearing was coming from the right direction so I ran over to the other side of the stream and he was just coming up a service road. Said he tried the hill a few more times after me and could'nt make it so he headed down stream .
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Old 03-19-2013, 11:26 AM   #27
High Country Herb
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Quote:
Originally Posted by baloneyskin daddy View Post
...looked like a trail but kept getting steeper and gnarlier as we went and soon enough we were at the point of no return...
I did that on my '83 XL600R. There was a cliff at the bottom with no way out but the way I came. I stood that baby on the rear wheel and climbed like a trials bike. Turns out what I consider the point of no return vs. what the old Honda can do are two different things. It is a goat...I am a sissy (unless faced with spending the night in the forest alone).
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Old 03-19-2013, 11:26 AM   #28
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These two bikes took a bunch of guys passing them up two human chains. But then a 625SXC and a DRZ400 down maybe 50' are manageable like that. This was about the craziest I have seen without tow ropes or a winch. Most others I have seen were recovered with a truck or Jeep.

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Old 03-19-2013, 11:40 AM   #29
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We once ended up at the bottom of a ravine with a 76 XT500 and a 76 Triumph Bonneville. There was no way to get the Triumph back up the hill. The way out was blocked by a 12 foot high chain link security fence. Pulled out the pliers, took the wraps off a couple poles, slid the chain link up, wrapped our belts around the fence bundle, and drove out. Put the fence down and got our belts back, put the wraps back on, drove out like we owned it...
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Old 03-19-2013, 03:56 PM   #30
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Pretty common in the snowmobile world.. TEAMWORK You DO carry a rope riding off road, right?
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