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Old 03-22-2013, 09:42 PM   #1
Plaka OP
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cooking oil rust treatment.

I'm noticing on some of my cooking pots, baked on vegetable oil makes an incredibly tough film. Anyone tried this on bolt heads to keep them from rusting?

I saw the bit on penetrol, but you have to keep redoing it.
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Old 03-23-2013, 12:57 AM   #2
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The vegetable oil would be difficult to apply evenly I think.

For a homemade rust preventive suitable for common steel nuts and bolts check out Parkerizing. Leaves a grey finish. Is better at preventing rust than gun bluing and is the finish of early US Army Colt 45's know as the 1911.
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Old 03-23-2013, 01:02 AM   #3
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How would you apply it ? The cooking oil on the pots took lots of cycles before it became the tough film that it is now.
Here is what I tried the other day, just for grins. I head been reading the thread on Rub'n Buff so i went ahead and bought some in Pewter and Ebony. Didn't like the way it looked on my valve cover so i removed it again, which was actually fairly tough to do.
So I notice the rusty head on my shock bolts and figured what the heck, why not. Here is the result:

Before/untreated right side:



After/ treated left side:

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Old 03-23-2013, 08:47 AM   #4
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Plaka View Post
I'm noticing on some of my cooking pots, baked on vegetable oil makes an incredibly tough film. Anyone tried this on bolt heads to keep them from rusting?

I saw the bit on penetrol, but you have to keep redoing it.
Is the weather really that crappy up in CO? You must be staring out the window, thinking of things to do to the bike . I'm not coming back from AZ until you get it back to riding weather .

Dave
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Old 03-23-2013, 08:51 AM   #5
Plaka OP
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Originally Posted by disston View Post
The vegetable oil would be difficult to apply evenly I think.

For a homemade rust preventive suitable for common steel nuts and bolts check out Parkerizing. Leaves a grey finish. Is better at preventing rust than gun bluing and is the finish of early US Army Colt 45's know as the 1911.
Thanks! Read up on the parkerizing. Similar to what I'm doing on the interior door hinges on my house (black phosphate). But I gotta buy stuff and it ain't cheap, and then I have to oil it anyway.

I was figuring just dip in the oil.
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Old 03-23-2013, 09:10 AM   #6
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Is the weather really that crappy up in CO? You must be staring out the window, thinking of things to do to the bike . I'm not coming back from AZ until you get it back to riding weather .

Dave
Something like that I'm dead in the water with a top end rebuild, the rear drive is apart for seals and de-crudding, I wanted to add some instruments, lighting, a proper relay mount, paint the fuse block mount, add an under bar horn switch, fab and install bar risers, and make new mirror mounts...then someone threw down the glove so I've been polishing everything and the headers really needed it, and painting the rest. Then fitting up some chrome and polished bits from my /5 and adding grease fittings and rebuilding worn pivots and then I recurved my spare bean can and added externally accesable advance limiting screws...plus a full fluid change, new brake lines, the drum brake conversion on the rear (finally made a rod, all stainless)...and there are some little things need fixing and cleaning up (like the wiring and relocated connection board)

So I had the tail light assembly off and you know those two bolts and the plate inside the fender? They take a beating and you can't see it but they were getting rusty.

So I tried the oil treatment last night. Heated the metal and dipped in cold oil, repeat. Kept the metal just hot enough to have the oil on them smoking. About 5 dips and they are pretty coated. hard and dry. Not too pretty but I have about 10 fish frys on that oil. I could probably get a nice straw color with clean oil. I wrenched the bolts around a bit and the wrench doesn't budge that stuff, but it is slick.

I wire brushed the plate till it shined, then the oil.





Either way I figure it's a no lose. I either get a durable coating or a way to clean my pots.
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Old 03-23-2013, 10:02 AM   #7
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Kai Ju View Post
How would you apply it ? The cooking oil on the pots took lots of cycles before it became the tough film that it is now.
Here is what I tried the other day, just for grins. I head been reading the thread on Rub'n Buff so i went ahead and bought some in Pewter and Ebony. Didn't like the way it looked on my valve cover so i removed it again, which was actually fairly tough to do.
I'll give you a heck of a test result on that. SS headers flanges are always corroding on my K-bike. Now sandblasted and rubbed/buffed. Already put them through a few heat cycles and still looks good. A few more days....I'll do the road tests.

BTW I already did some heat tests with the Oxy-Acetylene on other parts. All good.....!

You are right the Ebony has been useless so far and I did try it on the GS valve cover. I have some old "Black" SAE bolts here that my friend needs for the Triumph restoration, we may give that a try. Did a few corroding fasteners I couldn't remove on the K-bike with the silver and lots of detailing around the throttle bodies and even under the head around the exhausts.....so far so good.

Road tests soon....looks like we will be on the road early in the Kootenays this year.
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Old 03-23-2013, 10:11 AM   #8
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Originally Posted by disston View Post
Is better at preventing rust than gun bluing and is the finish of early US Army Colt 45's know as the 1911.
Actually, the early 1911s were blued, and later ones were parkerized, but that's just splitting hairs.

I think Colt started parkerizing their 1911s (1911A1s at that point) in mid '41, just prior to the war.

As I understand it, parkerizing, like other phosphate treatments, in and of itself does not prevent corrosion. Rather, it's a porous coating that "holds" oil and keeps it from being rubbed off the surface of metal. I might be wrong on that though.
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Old 03-23-2013, 10:37 AM   #9
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I would think that the same process for seasoning a cast iron skillet would work on bolt heads, but you will need to take them off the bike first.
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Old 03-23-2013, 01:59 PM   #10
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Q-tip, oil, done. No?

Let us know how it goes if you try it.
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Old 03-23-2013, 02:15 PM   #11
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Q-tip, oil, done. No?

Let us know how it goes if you try it.
Um no. but I did try it. Now how to test it without waiting 5 riding seasons to see how it holds up? What's a good accelerated test? Hot salt spray?
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Old 03-23-2013, 04:14 PM   #12
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AW,

I don't mind having the hairs split. I was under the wrong impression. (I'm just not all that big a gun nut anyway, no mater how hard I try)

I think you might get some more talk about the benefits of Parkerizing on antique Harley forums. Or some other antique forum. This was the way some original manufacturer did their nuts and bolts. I've thought for a long time that Parkerizing would be useful but I've never been able to try it.

I ordered a couple of the small cans of Kroil oil recently because I had run out. You can order from the Kano Labs Web page, they are the manufacturer of this favorite stew. On their Web pages are several other products I was not familiar with including Weatherproof;



I've got an 11 oz can of this stuff to try some time for rust prevention but it's been Winter and so not had the right temps for painting and the part I want to use this on is not a simple bolt I can pull out. Don't know if it will be all that durable. But it is sold by a company that has another product we all seem to love so I thought I'd try it for that reason mostly.

http://www.kanolabs.com/indSpec.html
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Old 03-23-2013, 04:20 PM   #13
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The process of baking an oil coating on cast iron pots is called seasoning. I use it. I never thought to appy it to my bike but burnt on oil on cooling fins is a bitch to remove so it makes sense. Cast being a rougher surface would make it stick better.
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Old 03-23-2013, 05:22 PM   #14
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Originally Posted by Airhead Wrangler View Post
Actually, the early 1911s were blued, and later ones were parkerized, but that's just splitting hairs.

I think Colt started parkerizing their 1911s (1911A1s at that point) in mid '41, just prior to the war.

As I understand it, parkerizing, like other phosphate treatments, in and of itself does not prevent corrosion. Rather, it's a porous coating that "holds" oil and keeps it from being rubbed off the surface of metal. I might be wrong on that though.
+1. I think they were parkerized much later than that?
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Old 03-23-2013, 06:33 PM   #15
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Parkerizing produces an iron phosphate coating on the surface. Bluing produces an iron oxide (Fe2O3 or Fe2O4) coating.

Parkerizing: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Parkerizing

Bluing: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bluing_%28steel%29

Home Parkerizing can use magnesium dioxide from standard zinc dry cells and phosphoric acid (etch n prep). Bluing can be done in various ways at home. Zinc plating at home would be better for exposed bolts, etc. IMO.

Zinc plating technique: www.triumphrat.net/classic-vintage-and-veteran/160243-zinc-plating-at-home.html

YMMV.
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